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Introduction

INTRODUCTION

In the present era of globalization and opening up of the Indian economy, there is a flow of new technology, products and resources to India. This influx with the modern technology is also bringing with it associated problems. The problems are more complex when the issue of management of safety, health and environment is concerned. This necessitates designing of newer policies and programmes. For the management of occupational safety and health through various instruments, such as, policies and programmes, it becomes essential to base these instruments on sound footing. This requires an assessment of the present status of occupational safety and health in the country. Presently information in this area is not up-to-date and readily available for the policy makers. A national inventory on capabilities and management of occupational safety and health will be of great help for designing and implementing various instruments to protect the safety and health of the large work force working in various sectors of the economy. India is a large country and building up such an inventory would be a monumental task and therefore needs to be done in a phased manner keeping in mind the various constraints.

India is a member of the International Labour Organisation and has ratified a number of ILO conventions. As a result, major part of the ILO Code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases is being followed along with the Indian Standard IS-3786 which is on the similar lines of the ILO Code of Practice. However, there is a delay at the unit level as well as at the district level on the part of the industrial organizations and enforcing agencies in collection, processing and dissemination of the information.

As such a pilot project was taken up for the state of Kerala with the objective to collect and compile various information on occupational safety and health and dissemination of information regarding extent of compliance with the important provisions under the Factories Act, 1948 and the rules framed thereunder including system of recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases as per the ILO Code of Practice at the unit and the state level.

Goa is the second state in the project because of smaller in size of the state and the second highest literacy rate and its willingness to be associated with the project. This project work has been conducted by the Safety Division of Central Labour Institute, Mumbai under the guidance of the Director General, DGFASLI and the assistance from the Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Goa. The activities of the project have been divided in the following categories:

(i) Background information about the State of Goa  :  Deals with the demographic and geographic characteristics of the State of Goa, population in different districts and major occupations of the people.

(ii) Economic Activities  :  Deals with the various aspects of economic sectors in the state, their value of production, employment generated and contribution to the GDP.

(iii) Activities in manufacturing sector  :  Deals with the different activities carried out in the manufacturing sector as per the National Industrial Code, value of production, employment generation, etc.

(iv)Occupational injuries and diseases  :  Deals with the analysis of the occupational injuries – fatal and non-fatal and cases of occupational diseases in the manufacturing sector.

(v) Management of occupational Safety and Health  :  Deals with the infrastructure and resources available in the unit level and at the state level for managing the crucial issue of occupational safety and health.

(vi) Resources available and needed for the management of occupational safety and health  :  Based on the analysis of occupational injuries and diseases and the capabilities available in the state of Goa for the management of occupational safety and health, an attempt is made to assess the resources required for the better management of occupational safety and health.

For the data collection, the task force made field visit of the state capital Panaji and the industrial area around it from 15th to 24th January, 2003. The information pertaining to various economic sectors was collected by visiting each of the departments, having detailed discussions with the respective heads and referring to the annual returns of these departments. The information related with the manufacturing sectors were collected from the annual returns submitted by the factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948. The data related to the occupational injuries and diseases were analysed by studying the accident forms and recording them on to the data sheets specifically designed for this purpose. The industry-wise, cause-wise details of accidents were obtained by developing suitable>

For the assessment of infrastructure available and capabilities of the organizations, institutions and agencies engaged in safety and health, the profile programme on the similar lines as that developed by ILO was used.

Data collection and analysis was completed in specific time frame because of active co-operation from various people involved with the project.

Background information

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

1. INTRODUCTION

Goa which was liberated on 19th December, 1961 along with Daman and Diu from 451 years Portuguese Colonial Rule, became the 25th State of the Indian Union when it was conferred Statehood on 30th May, 1987.

The State of Goa has a Legislative Assembly with a strength of 40 elected members. Besides, Goa has three elected representatives in the Central Parliament. The Governor is the Head of the State and is advised by a Council of Ministers headed by Chief Minister. Panaji, a small picturesque town on the left bank of river Mandovi, is the seat of the State Administration. However, for administrative purposes, the State has been divided into two districts. North Goa and South Goa with headquarters at Panaji and Margao respectively, and six divisions comprising 11 Talukas.

Ensconced on the slopes of the Western ghats (Sahyadri ranges) Goa is bounded on the North by Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra, on the East by Belgaum, on the South by Karwar district of Karnataka and on the West by Arabian Sea. Its rivers, Tiracol, Chapora, Mandovi, Zuari, Sal and Talpona, which are navigable throughout the year, have their origin in the Sahyadri ranges and flow westward into the Arabian Sea. 60 kms away, breaking the long coast line covering a length of 105 kms. into enchanting estuaries and bays which mark off idyllic palm fringed beaches like Arambol, Vagator, Anjuna, Baga and Calangute in the North and Colva, Betual and Palolem in the south.

2.2 DEMOGRAPHIC CONTEXT

The total population of Goa is 1343998 (as per Census 2001), out of which 685617 are males and 658381 are females. The sex ratio (number of females per 1000 males) is 960. Goa is the second highest literate state in India having a literacy rate of 82.3%.

2.2.1 Towns and Villages:

The State of Goa has a total number of 383 villages which includes North and South Goa. The total number of towns are 31 in the state. It is shown in the table>

TABLE – 1

Source : Directorate of Planning, Statistics and Evaluation, Goa

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1Total No. of Villages233150383
2No. of Towns181331

2.2.2 Area and Population

The total area of the state is about 370200 sq. km. and has a population of about 1169793, as per the 1991 census. The density of population is 316 per sq. km. with male population of 594790 and female 575003. The rural population is 690041 which is more than the urban population of 479752. Number of main workers was found to be 383559. The birth rate (per thousand) was 17.40, death rate 7.47 and Infant Mortality Rate was 16.42 in the year 2000 (under study) as revealed in the table>

TABLE - 2

Source :Directorate of Planning, Statistics and Evaluation, Goa

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1Area (Sq. Km)173600196600370200
2Population6648045049891169793
3Density (per Sq. Km)383257316
4Male Population338620256170594790
5Female Population326184248819575003
6Rural Population439200250841690041
7Urban Population225604254148479752
8No. of main workers220625162934383559
9Birth Rate (Per thousand)17.4417.3617.40
10Death Rate (Per thousand)8.246.457.47
11Infant Mort. Rate (Per thousand)24.545.5416.42

2.2.3 Agriculture

The State has a total reporting area of 361113 hectares. The area under forest was 125473 hectares with land not available for cultivation as 37137 hectares. The net area for cultivation comes to 171455 hectares. The normal rainfall was 3149 mm in the year 2000 as shown in Table-3.

TABLE – 3

Source :Directorate of Planning, Statistics and Evaluation, Goa

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1Total Reporting Area (Hectares)167436193677361113
2Area Under Forest (Hectares)3504290431125473
3Land not available for cultivation205191661837137
4Permanent pastures and other grazing land6296761305
5Land under miscellaneous tree crops and groves not included in the net area sowed57010580
6Cultivable waste land including fallow land267352836955104
7Net area sown8394157573141514
8Area sown more than once22211773029441
9Gross cropped area10615265303171455
10Area irrigated18340899227332
11Normal rainfall (mm)318831103149

2.2.4 Manufacturing Industries

There were 837 factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948 during the year 2000 with 40318 average number of daily workers employed. The total number of Small Scale Units in the year 2000 was 5949, employing 40797 average number of daily workers. Further, large and medium scale industries were 142, employing 19300 daily workers. This is shown in Table-4.

TABLE - 4

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1No. of Factories Registered under Factories Act479358837
2No. of Factories in working regd. of F.A. 1948340260600
3Estimated average No. of daily workers employed in regd. Factories228221749640318
4No.of S.S.Ind.Regd. with Ind. Deptt.363023195949
5Estimated average No. of daily worker employed in S.S. Inds.244571634040797
6No. of large and medium scale Inds.8656142
7Employment in large and medium scale industries.89981030219300

2.2.5 Power

There were 18 towns electrified in the year under reference with 360 villages electrified. The total energy consumption in the state was 991.9 MKWH. Out of it, 14.14 MKWH was consumed for irrigation purpose and 526.24 for industrial purpose and rest 491.52 was consumed for other purposes. Given in Table-5.

TABLE – 5

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1No. of towns electrified12618
2No. of villages electrified220140360
3Total energy consumption (MKWH)551.297440.606991.903
4Energy Consumed for irrigation (MKWH)8.1406.00014.140
5Energy Consumed for Indl. Purpose(MKWH)261.210265.030526.240

2.2.6 Water Supply

Total water consumption in the state was 215724 thousand CuM.

TABLE – 6

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1Water consumed (1000 CuM)107139108585215724

2.2.7 Education

The literacy rate in the state was 76% out of which 84% was male while 67% was female.

TABLE – 7

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth Goa%
1Total literacy787376
2Male Literacy868084
3Female literacy696567

2.2.8 Public Health

In the state, there were 17 Government Hospitals and 105 Private Hospitals with 22 Community/Primary Health Centres.

TABLE - 8

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1No. of specialized and general hospitals8917
2No. of community/primary Health Centres (attached hospitals)121022
3No. of private Hospitals6144105

2.2.9 Transport Accidents

The reported Road Traffic Accidents were 2602. The fatalities were 218 with 1701 bodily injury cases. Remaining 683 cases were no injury accidents.

TABLE – 9

Reference Period: 2000

  North GoaSouth GoaTotal
1No. of Road Traffic Accidents135412482602
2No. of Persons Killed12194218
3No. of injured7439581701

2.3 ECONOMIC SCENARIO

The State’s income in 1997-98 at constant prices was Rs.83,832 lakhs as against Rs.82,381 lakhs in 1996-97, registering a growth rate of 1.8%. the sectoral distribution of State income during 1997-98 at constant prices was as given in Table-10 :

TABLE – 10

S.No.Primary SectorRs. (in Lakhs)
1Agriculture7048
2Forestry and logging240
3Fishing2039
4Mining and Quarrying1825
S.No.Secondary SectorRs. (in Lakhs)
5Manufacturing26983
6Electricity, Gas & Water Supply120
7Construction2353
 Turtiary Sector 
8Trade Hotels and Restaurants9337
9Transport storage and communication9744
10Railways45
11Transport by other means8997
12Storage18
13Communications684
14Financing Insurance &Real state &Business Services16995
15Banking and insurance14000
16Real state and Ownership of dwelling and business services2995
17Community social and personal services7388
18Public Administration1923
19Other services5465

Source: Statistical Handbook of Goa, 1998-99

2.3.1 The per capita income of the State is Rs.6294/- at constant prices and Rs.23482/- at current priced based on 1980-81.

2.3.4 Agriculture

2.3.4.1 Contribution to State Income : Agriculture is one of the major economic activities of the people in Goa, contributing about 6% to the State domestic product.

2.3.4.2 Population Engaged in Agriculture Sector : During 2000-01, agriculture was persued by about 16% of the working population of the State. Agriculture in Goa is quite commercialized in the sense that 53% of the cropped area was covered under Horticulture crops such as cashew, mango and other fruit crops.

2.3.4.3 Area Under Cultivation : The geographical area of the state is 370200 ha (1991 senses) of which total area was 171356 ha. under cultivation during 2000-01. Out of total cultivated area, 68678 ha. (40%) was covered under food grain crops, 90854 ha. (53%) under Horticulture crops and 11824 ha. (7%) under other crops like vegetable>

2.3.4.4 Area Under Irrigation : During the year 2000-01, the total area irrigated in the state was about 23345 ha.

2.3.4.5 Major Crops : The major crops in the State of Goa are rice, ragi, maize and pulses. The total coverage of food grain crop was 68678 ha. with production of 153074 tonnes during 2000-01.

The commercial crops of groundnuts and sugarcane were cultivated in 1781 ha. and 1250 ha., respectively with production of 3151 tonnes and 72750 tonnes, respectively. The production of cash crops like coconut, cashew nut and areca nut were 122 tonnes, 10364 tones and 1880 tonnes, respectively.

2.3.4.6 Fertilizer consumption and plant protection measures : The fertilizer consumption during 2000-01 was 5843 tonnes and the technical grade pesticide consumption was 2.5 tonnes under plant protection measures.

2.3.5 Tourism Sector : Tourism sector is the largest economic sector in the State of Goa. The main function of the sector are infrastructure development pertaining to tourism, implementation of Tourist Trade Act, promotion of tourism by way of advertising in tourism related magazines, through T.V. Channels, website, participating in national and international road shows and presentation and events such as TTF, ITTM, PATA, SATTE, WTM, ATM, ITB, etc.

Contribution to State Income : The foreign exchange coming from tourism sector was estimated around Rs.1500/- crores for the year 2000.

Employment : Tourism is highly labour intensive as compared to any other industry. In the State of Goa, around 25% of people out of total population are employed in tourism sector.

Area Covered : The whole State of Goa.

Accident Occurred : Only a few drowning cases of tourists while bathing in the sea and some deaths due to road accidents happened during the year 2000.

2.3.6 Manufacturing Sector

Manufacturing sector is the second largest economic sector in the State of Goa comprising of manufacturing units both registered and unregistered but does not include mining, quarrying, generation of electricity and gas, water supply, construction and tourism.

2.3.6.1 Contribution to State Income : At constant prices (1993-94 base year) in the year 1999-2000 and 2000-01 the manufacturing sector has contributed Rs.99547 lakhs and Rs.100254 lakhs, respectively.

2.3.6.2 Employment : As per census of India 1991, there are 4.13 lakhs female and 5.23 lakhs male workers engaged in manufacturing sector. They represent 35.28 and 38.9% of the total working population of the state, respectively.

2.3.7 Mining Sector

Mining has been a very important element of the economic history of modern Goa. It started in 1950s and has played a key role both in the economic numbers and in the local lore. The importance of mining and quarrying to the net state domestic product has, however, been falling over the last 25 years.

2.3.7.1 The mineral resources in the state are mainly iron-ore (Goan Iron Ore and Non-Goan Iron Ore) and Manganese Ore.

2.3.7.2 Contribution to State Economy : In 1970/71, the share of income from the mining sector was 11.7%, in 1980/81, it has fallen to 5.5% and further to 4.7% in 1990/91. However, in 1994/95, it was raised to 7.7%. This is as per bulletin available from the Department of Industry, Government of Goa.

2.3.7.3 Mining Area : The mining belt is divided into three regions based on the concentration of iron ore – the northern zone, the central zone and the southern zone. Usgao river is the dividing line between the northern and the central zone and the Sanguem river between the Central and the Southern zone. The maximum area under mining leases is in Sanguem Taluk followed by Bicholim, Satari and Quepem. And analysis of the surface area utilization of these four talukas reveals that Sangium forests area occupies the largest area while in Bicholim, cultivated and orchard lands occupy the highest.

2.3.7.4 Production/Export in Mines (in 2000-01)

 Production

 

(Tonnes)

Export

 

(Tonnes)

Iron Ore1460018015
Manganese Ore1095.5
Boxite3030.0

2.3.8 Port Sector

2.3.8.1 The State of Goa has about 555 kms of inland waterways out of which 256 kms are navigable. There are seven navigable rivers, viz. Tiracol, Chapora, Mandovi, Zuari, Sal, Talpona and Galgibag. There are six ports in the state. Mormugao is the only major port in the State, controlled by Ministry of Surface Transport, Government of India. Remaining 5 minor ports – Tiracol on river Tiracol, Chapora on river Chapora, Panaji on river Mandovi, Betul on river Sal and Talpona on river Talpona are controlled by the Captain of Ports Department, Government of Goa. Panaji Port being centrally located and mainly used by barges, passenger boat, cargo vessels, pleasure yatch, mechanized fishing trawlers, etc.

2.3.8.2 Contribution to State Income : The revenue collection for the year 2000-01 was Rs.3.35 crores.

2.3.8.3 Employment : The average on board the ships and shore employment in the Port of Mormugao was 842 in the year 2000-01. The employment in the minor port was 132 during the year under study.

2.3.8.4 Cargo Handled : The volume of cargo handled (in million tonnes excluding bulk oil imported) at the Port of Mormugao during the year 2000-01 was 15.79 on board the ship. The cargo handled on shore (in million tonnes excluding bulk oil imported) for the year 2000-01 was 15.79.

2.3.8.5 Accidents : The total number of accidents on board the ship was 4 for the year 2000-01 while on shore, it was 19 only. However, there was no accidents reported in the minor ports.

2.3.9 Power Generation

2.3.9.1 The Electricity Department, Government of Goa is dealing with transmission, distribution and supply of electricity in the State of Goa. The State does not have any power generation system. Its entire power requirement is met from Central Sector Generation, however, in the State of Goa, there exists one independent power producer (IPP) from whom 30 MW of power is drawn and utilized within the state. The surplus power available is traded to the neighbouring states in the Western Region.

2.3.9.2 Contribution to State Income : Department purchases the power in bulk (357 MW) from Central Sector Stations, such as NTPC. The revenue collected is going in the common pool of the Government Treasury. The State Government provides funds through budget for operation and maintenance and capital expenditure for executing new schemes and other developmental works.

2.3.9.3 Employment : During the year 2002, the Department has 3982 staff which includes technical and non-technical.

2.3.9.4 Area Covered : The State of Goa is about 100% electrified.

2.3.9.5 Accidents : During the year 2002, total fatal and non-fatal accidents occurred are 17 and 19, respectively to human beings including departmental staff. Also 23 fatal accidents occurred to animals due to electrocution.

2.3.10 Road Transport Sector

2.3.10.1 In the State of Goa, the Directorate of Transport is the regulatory authority for Road Transport in accordance with the provisions of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989 and Goa Motor Vehicles Rules, 1991. Goa has a network of roads having a total length of 9240.458 kms. As on 31.3.1998. The roads are maintained by various agencies such as PWD, Panchayats, Municipalities, Forest Department, etc.

2.3.10.2 Contribution to State Income : The revenue collection of the Department during the year 2000 is Rs.33.60 Crores.

2.3.10.3 Employment : Besides the staff employed for administrative work in the Department and its sub-offices, executive staff also are involved in maintaining discipline on road by checking traffic violation, etc. and evasion of motor vehicle taxes by enforcing various provisions of the M.V. Act, 1988, Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989 and State Taxation Act and Rules. Due to liberalization of grant of various types of permits, lot of self employment has been generated as the unemployed have been encouraged to by vehicles to ply as public service vehicles which are being driven by owners themselves.

2.3.10.4 Area Covered : The Directorate of Transport is having its Head office at Janta House, Panaji manned by the Director of Transport and sub-offices at Panaji, Mapusa, Bicholim, Ponda, Margao and Vasco which are manned by Assistant Directors of Transport as Head of Offices.

2.3.10.5 Accidents Occurred : The number of accidents during the period 2000 is as under:

FatalNon-FatalTotal
22327903013

2.3.11 Fishing Sector

2.3.11.1 The state of Goa has all the requisite natural endowments for building a strong fisheries economy. A long stretch of coastal belt and an extensive inland water-spread make fishing a major sector of economy.

2.3.11.2 Contribution to State Income: During the year 2000-01, the fishing sector contributed Rs.5191 lakhs at constant price of 1993-94. The fish production during 1998 was given below:

Marine67.236 Tonnes
Inland8.765 Tonnes
Total76.001 Tonnes

2.3.12 Forest Sector

The State of Goa has a vast area under Forest Sector. During the year 1998-99, the total area of land under forest was 2848.76 Sq. Kms. Additional area brought under plantation during the year 1998-99 was 967.5 Ha (Hectare). The State revenue spent on the above plantation work was Rs.183.98 lakhs. Fire wood 1073.702 Cu.Mt., Bamboos 38900 Nos. and Cane 71332 Nos. has fetched the state a total revenue of 54.50 lakhs (approximately) during the year 1998-1999.

Manufacturing sector

MANUFACTURING SECTOR

3.1 MAJOR INDUSTRIES

In the State of Goa there are 837 factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948. Out of these, 586 factories are working as on the date of the study. The sector wise break-up is as follows:

Public Sector : 29

Private Sector : 557

However, the total No. of large and medium industries as on 31-12-2000 was 142.

As per index of industrial production for 1996-97 with base year 1980/81, the following industries contributed to most of the value of industrial production in the State:

S.No. Industry GroupIndex for 1996-97
1Manufacture of machinery and equipment (other than transport equipment)1486.00
2Manufacture of paper and paper products and printing, publishing and allied industries813.00
3Manufacture of basic chemicals and chemical products (except products of petroleum and coal)649.00
4Manufacture of transport equipment and parts646.00
5Other manufacturing industries545.00
6Manufacture of beverage and tobacco and related products446.00
7Manufacture of Textile products308.00
8Manufacture of cotton textiles294.00
9Manufacture of plastics, petroleum products by processing of nuclear fuels271.00
10Manufacture of non-metallic mineral products266.00
11Manufacture of metal products and parts (except machinery and equipment)252.00
12Manufacture of food products225.00
13Manufacture of wood and wood products (furniture and fixtures)117.00
14Manufacture of jute and other vegetable>115.00

Annual Indices of Industrial Production in 1996-97 based on 1980-91 = 100.

Small Scale Sector

In the small scale sector, the total number of small scale units come up were 208 in the year 2000-01 and 312 in the year 2001-02, with investment of Rs.1161.89 lakhs and Rs.2436.57 lakhs respectively.

Today, Goa has developed industrially a lot. Contribution from industries to the net domestic product has increased from 9.8% in 1960 to 27% in 1998-99. There are 18 industrial estates in the State of Goa. As on November, 2000, there were 6081 small scale industries and 143 medium and large scale industries in Goa. As per Annual Survey of Industries conducted by the National Sample Survey Organisation, the index of industrial production in Goa has increased over five times during the last decades.

Sr.No.YearNo. of UnitsEmploymentFixed Investment(Rs in Crores)
11987-88327122657508
21988-89360224438603
31989-90392426136719
41990-91412027238807
51991-92434428459900
61992-93455829672999
71993-944787309181126
81994-954995320421224
91995-965118331361344
101996-975278344721576
111997-985488367341841
121998-995765394322191

Source : SIDBI Report on SSI Sector : 2000

Investment and employment generated from 1987-88 to 1998-99 may be seen in the above table

In the small scale sector, the contribution to the value of industrial production by majority of industries as on 2000-01 is given below:

IndustryValue (Rs in lakhs)
Fishing5191.00
Forestry and logging769.00
Mining and Quarrying8547.00
Agriculture26644.00
Storage79.00
Communication2910.00

3.2 INDUSTRIAL UNREST, STRIKES, LOCKOUTS AND MANDAYS LOST

 ItemsYears
  199920002001
1Industrial Disputes301288302
2Disputes settled152127162
3Strike276
4Mandays lost due to strikes9764113848316
5Lockouts2--1
6Mandays lost due to lockouts239038381728
7Contract labour employed245234396975

Manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES COVERED UNDER THE FACTORIES ACT, 1948

Manufacturing is the second largest economic sector in the State of Goa. It covers units those registered under the Factories Act, 1948 as well as those not registered. As per the provisions of the Act, a manufacturing unit is to be registered if manufacturing process is carried on with the aid of power and 10 or more persons are employed or manufacturing process is carried on without the aid of power and 20 or more persons are employed.

The State Government is also empowered to notify any unit carrying on manufacturing process as a factory, irrespective of the number of persons employed therein.

4.1 As on 31-12-2000, there were 632 registered factories.

4.1.1 In the beginning of the year 2000, there were 596 factories on register. New licensed and registered factories were 53 during the year under study and factories removed from the register were 17, thus total number of factories on the register as on 31-12-2000 were 632. Category wise registered factories are given in the following table>

TABLE - 1

Category of FactoriesNo. of factories on register in the beginningNo. of factories newly licensed and registeredNo. of factories removed during the periodNo. of factories on register at the end of the yearNo. of working factories
123456
Factories as defined U/S 2m(i)5965317632586
Factories as definedU/S 2m(ii)----------
Factories as notifiedU/S 85----------
Total5965317632586

Out of 586 working factories, 502 factories have submitted annual returns while 84 factories did not submit the same during the year 2000. The break-up of factories submitted annual return for the year 2000 in some of the major industrial sector is given in the following table>

TABLE – 2

S.No.IndustryNo. of Factories
1Basic chemicals and chemical products100
2Machinery and equipment (other than transport equipment)75
3Rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products60
4Basic metal and alloys51
5Paper and paper products and printing, publishing and allied42
6Food Products38
7Metal products and parts (except machinery and equipment)34
8Textile products33
9Beverage, tobacco and related products31
10Non-metallic mineral products30

Other manufacturing industries have occupied 26, i.e. 4.4% of the total number of working factories. Similarly factories doing repairing of capital goods cover 11 (1.88%), Wholesale trade in wood, paper and leather items cover 5 (0.8%), Repair of service cover 6 factories (0.9%) and Mining of iron ore cover 7 factories (1.2%).

4.1.2 Employment in Registered Factories: The details of employment of Male and Female workers engaged in factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948 are given in the table>

TABLE – 3

S.No.IndustryAverage number of persons employed
  MaleFemaleTotal
1Basic chemicals and chemical products694522599204
2Transport equipment and parts38661424008
3Basic metals and alloys24821712653
4Food products145610422498
5Rubber, plastics, petroleum & coal products23061232429
6Electricals and electronic machinery13469182264
7Beverages14043871791
8Paper printing, publishing & allied products8282511079
9Non-metallic mineral products761199960
10Textile products748253901
11Repair of capital goods714114828
12Repair of services1893192
13Wholesale trade15615171
14Cotton and textiles6178139
15Water works and supply10131132
16Storage and warehousing6167128
17Wood products36339

There were not a single adolescent or child worker engaged in factories manufacturing chemicals and chemical products employing the largest number of workers 9204 including 2259 female workers. It represents 24.80% of the total workforce employed in the factories submitting returns.

Manufacturing of transport equipment and parts has the second highest employment of workers, 4008 which is 10.8% of the total employment. Here male workers are comprising of 10.42% of the total male workforce.

Manufacturing of basic metals and alloys has the third highest employment of workers – 2653 out of which 2482 are male workers. It constitutes 7.1% of the total workforce employed.

Average number of persons employed in major industrial activities in the year 2000 is given below:

TABLE – 4

S.No.Manufacturing activityMaleFemaleTotal
1Allopathic medicines158811392727
2Ship and other power driven vessels19081142022
3Inorganic fertilizers164961655
4Tyres and tube for motor vehicles117711178
5Cashew nut processing and packaging1339491082
6Basic vitamins7652631028
7Structurals70720727
8Aerated drinks64268710
9Beer370124494
10Glass fibres and products46330493
11Ship and machinery repairs47711488
12Distilling, rectifying and blending of spirits343145488
13Bus body building4162418
14Ropes, nets, etc.32080400
15Optical lenses287111398
16Pig iron3882390
17Iron pallets3783381
18Parts and accessories for ships3695374
19Tooth paste33815343
20Parts and accessories3271328

No adolescent male worker was engaged.

4.1.3 Man-days Worked: In the State of Goa total mandays worked in the factories submitting annual returns during 2000 were 10.96 (million). The major industry-wise break-up of total mandays into male and female workers worked is given in the following table>

TABLE - 5

S.No.IndustryMan-days Worked in Millions
  MaleFemaleTotal
1Basic chemicals and chemical products2.1300.5682.698
2Transport equipment and parts1.1610.0361.197
3Basic metals and alloys0.6050.0610.666
4Food products0.4630.2800.743
5Electricals and electrical machinery and parts0.4040.2680.672
6Rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products0.7160.0370.743
7Beverages0.4110.1100.521
8Paper and paper products, publishing, printing, etc.0.2750.1010.376
9Textile products0.1990.0790.278
10Repair of capital goods0.2540.0140.268

Manufacture of Basic chemicals and chemical products accounts for highest (24.5%) of the total man-days worked in the factories submitting returns. Manufacture of Transport equipments and its parts is the second higher figure with 10.9% of the total employment. In Basic chemicals and chemical products, almost 21% of the total man-days are worked by women, while only 3% of the man-days are worked by women in Transport Equipment and Parts manufacturing industry.

Manufacturing of Rubber, Plastic, Petroleum and Coal Products has got the third highest man-days worked and constitutes about 8.9% of total man-days worked. The male workers dominate and cover 96.4% of the total man-days worked.

Manufacturing of Electricals and Electronic Machinery and Parts occupies the next place and has accounted 8% of the total man-days worked. In these industries the male workers have covered about 60% of the total man-days worked.

Manufacturing of basic Metals and Alloys cover about 7.9% of the total man-days worked, out of which about 90% are male workers.

Manufacturing of Beverages comes to the next place and accounts for about 6.2% of the total, out of which about 78.9% man-days worked is covered by male workers.

The mandays worked (in millions) in major manufacturing activities in the state of Goa are given in the following table>

TABLE - 6

S.No.Major Manufacturing ActivitiesMan-days Worked

 

(in millions)

1Allopathic medicines0.861
2Ships and other vessels driven by power0.761
3Inorganic fertilizers0.603
4Cashew nut processing and packaging0.355
5Tyres and tubes for motor vehicles and tractors0.364
6Basic vitamins0.321
7Aerated drinks0.243
8Structurals0.211
9Ship and machinery repairs, etc.0.158
10Beer0.150

4.1.4 Man-hours Worked : The total man-hours worked in the factories submitting returns during 2000 were 65.17 millions. The industry-wise break-up is given in the following table

TABLE - 7

S.No.IndustryMan-hours (in millions)
  MaleFemaleTotal
1Basic chemicals and chemical products17.0454.54421.589
2Transport equipment and parts10.070029510.365
3Basic metals and alloys5.9550.4856.440
4Food products3.1022.2405.342
5Electricals and electronic machinery and parts3.2442.1515.395
6Rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products5.9210.3006.221
7Beverages3.2900.8864.176
8Paper, paper products, publishing and printing, etc.2.2060.8083.014
9Textile products1.5910.6302.221
10Repair of capital goods0.2920.1170.409

Manufacturing of Basic Chemicals and Chemical Products accounts for the highest (about 33%) of the total man-hours worked in the industries submitting the annual returns. About 80% of these man-hours are contributed by male workers only.

Transport Equipment and Parts accounts for next highest man-hours and is about 16% of the total man-hours, out of which 90% is covered by male workers.

Basic Metals and Alloys covers about 10% of the total man-hours, out of which 92.5% is worked by male workers only.

Rubber, Plastic, Petroleum and Coal Products accounts for about 9.5% man-hours, out of which about 95% is covered by male workers.

Electricals and Electronic Machinery and Parts cover next place and accounts for about 8.2% of the total man-hours, out of which 60% accounts for the male workers only.

Food products industry is the next higher place and it covers about 8% of the total man-hours, out of which 58% are the male workers and 42% are the female workers covering the total man-hours worked.

The man-hours worked (in million) in major manufacturing activities in the state are given in the following table

TABLE - 8

S.No.Major Manufacturing ActivitiesMahnhours (in Millions)
  MaleFemaleTotal
1Allopathic medicines3.7812.8276.608
2Ships and other vessels driven by power6.5100.2426.752
3Inorganic fertilizers5.0600.0115.071
4Cashew nut processing and packaging0.2811.8102.091
5Tyres and tubes for motor vehicles and tractors3.0380.0023.040
6Basic vitamins1.8940.6832.573
7Aerated drinks1.6000.2391.839
8Structurals1.4700.0841.554
9Ship and machinery repairs, etc.1.3900.0331.423
10Beer0.8550.2781.133

4.2 HAZARDOUS UNITS

As per the provisions of the Factories Act, 1948, any unit carrying on manufacturing process which has potential to cause material impairment to the health of the workers or pollution of the general environment, is termed as unit carrying on hazardous process. Similarly, the State Government is also empowered to declare any operation or process as dangerous, if in its opinion the process or operation has a potential to cause a serious bodily injury, poisoning or diseases to persons exposed to such operation or processes.

4.2.1 Number of Units : In the State of Goa, there are units which are only carrying on hazardous processes. Some units are carrying on operations declared as dangerous, but many units are carrying on operations or processes which are of hazardous as well as of dangerous in nature by the State Government. The factories which are carrying on only hazardous process, but not declared as dangerous by the State Government are 320 units only. Similarly the factories which are carrying on operations declared as dangerous by the State Government but not carrying on any hazardous process, as defined under the Factories Act, 1948, are 36 units. However, there are only 8 units which are carrying on hazardous processes as well as the operations declared as dangerous by the State Government. Out of these, two factories are manufacturing beverage, tobacco and tobacco products, three factories are manufacturing chemical works, one is manufacturing manipulation of dangerous pesticides, one is manufacturing rubber work and one is engaged in generation of electricity.

The details of the employment in hazardous units for the year 2000 are given in the following table>

TABLE - 9

FACTORIES CARRYING ON PROCESSES OR OPERATION DECLARED DANGEROUS

UNDER SECTION 87 AND WORKERS EMPLOYED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31-12-2000

Industry (Major Group)Dangerous Processes/ OperationsNo. of Working FactoriesAverage Daily No. of Workers Employed in the FactoryAverage Daily No. of workers employed in Dangerous processes or operations
22 Manufacture of
beverages,
tobacco and
tobacco products
Manufacture of aerated water and processes incidental thereto217260
30 Manufacture of
chemical and
chemical
products
i) Chemical works31836162
ii) Manufacture of
manipulation of
dangerous
pesticides
159164
31 Manufacture of
rubber, plastic,
petroleum and
coal products
Chemical works1982
40 Electricity
generation,
transmission and
distribution
Generation of electricity1266
 TOTAL82723288

4.3 MAJOR ACCIDENT HAZARD UNITS

The Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 amended (1994) framed under the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 provides for >

4.3.1 There are 10 MAH units working in the State of Goa. The details of M.A.H. units with nature of industry, chemicals handled, maximum quantity stored, threshold quantity for middle tier, threshold quantity for upper tier with status of On-site Emergency Plan in the year 2000 are given in table>

TABLE - 10

STATUS OF M.A.H. UNITS AS ON DECEMBER, 2000

Sr. No.Nature of IndustryChemical HandledMaximum Quantity StoredThreshold quantity for middle tier requirementStatus of On-site planThreshold quantity for upper tier requirementStatus of safety audit and safety report
1Brass stripsLPG100 T15 TSubmitted200 TN.A.
2Glass FibreLPG60 T15 TSubmitted200 TN.A.
3L.P.G. BottlingLPG430 T15 TSubmitted200 TPrepared
4Copper rodLPG47 T15 TSubmitted200 TN.A.
5Domestic InsecticidesLPG20 T15 TSubmitted200 TN.A.
6FertilizersAmmonia3000 T50 TSubmitted500 TPrepared
  Naphtha15000 T1000 T 5000 T 
  Arsonic Trioxide0.3 T0.1 T -- 
  Hydrogen7 T2 T 50 T 
7Petroleum storage and distributionNaphtha24000 T1000 TSubmitted5000 TPrepared
  H.S.D.16000 T1000 T 5000 T 
  Petroleum products(Class ‘A’)13000 T1000 T 5000 T 
8Power GenerationNaphtha1000 T1000 TSubmitted5000 TN.A.
9PesticidesChlorine120 T10 TSubmitted25 TPrepared
  Phosphamidon50 T0.1 T -- 
10Emulsifier, textile auxiliaries, leather, chemicals, surfactants, paper, chemicalsEthylene Oxide7.5 T3.5 TSubmitted50 TN.A.
  Propylene Oxide7.5 T3.5 T 50 T 

4.3.2 Employment : The details of the employment in MAH units for the year 2000 are given in the following table

TABLE - 11

STATUS OF MAH UNITS AS ON DECEMBER, 2000

Sr. No.NIC Code No.Name of the FactoryNature of IndustryAverage No. of Employment
    MaleFemaleTotal
1334.1Meta Strips Ltd.Brass strips2239232
2321.2Goa Glass Fibre Ltd., ColvaleGlass Fibre25812270
3315HPCL, KundaimLPG Bottling25--25
4333.9Finolex Essex Inds., UsgaonCopper Rod993102
5304.9Filpack Pvt. Ltd., PilerneDomestic Insecticides91221
6301.2Zuari IndustriesFertilizers163841642
7614IOCL, VascoPetroleum storage and distribution741286
8400.3Reliance, SalgaonkarPower Generation40242
9301.4Syngenta (I) Ltd.Pesticides58110591
10309.7Venus EthoxyethersEmulsifier, textile auxiliaries, leather, chemicals, surfactants, paper, chemicals140101241

Occupational injuries in manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES

(COVERED UNDER THE FACTORIES ACT, 1948)

The State of Goa has 586 working industries covered under the Factories Act, 1948. In the year 2000, there were 165 reportable

For

5.1 FATAL INJURIES

The fatal injuries in the State of Goa as reported in the Annual Returns submitted by the factories for the year 2000 are 6 (six). The six fatal accidents were analyzed as per IS 3786 : 1983 and the ILO Code of Practice of Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases. The analysis has been done industry group-wise, cause wise, agency wise, nature of injury wise, location of injury wise, sex and age wise respectively.

5.1.1 Industry wise : Of the total 6 fatal injuries analysed, 4 accidents were in the units manufacturing Basic Metals and Alloys. The industry wise analysis revealed that about 66.8% of fatal injuries occurred in Basic Metals and Alloys Industries and 16.6% each occurred in Chemicals and Chemical Products and Transport Equipment and Parts manufacturing industries. The industry wise fatal injuries are given in Table-1.

TABLE – 1
INDUSTRY WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Industry

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Manufacture of Chemicals and Chemical Products

1

16.6

2

Basic metals and Alloys

4

66.8

3

Manufacture of Transport Equipment and Parts

1

16.6

5.1.2 Cause-wise : The analysis of the 6 fatal injuries shows that “Fall of the Persons” and “Exposure to or contact with electric objects” have contributed to about 33.3% each of total fatal accidents. Rest 16.6% each was contributed by “Stepping, Striking & Struck against” and “Fall of objects”, respectively. Table-2 shows the above cause-wise break-up of fatal injuries.

TABLE – 2
CAUSE WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Type of Accident

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Fall of persons

2

33.3

2

Exposure to or contact with electric objects

2

33.3

3

Stepping, striking, struck against

1

16.7

4

Fall of objects

1

16.7

5.1.3 Agency-wise : In terms of the agency involved in the fatal injuries, Explosives, Metal Working Machines, Other Wheeled means of Transport and Other Equipment have contributed each 16.7% and Electrical Installation has caused only 33.2% which is the remaining percentage. Table 3 gives the agency-wise fatal accidents.

TABLE – 3
AGENCY WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Agency Involved

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Explosive

1

16.7

2

Electrical Installations

2

33.2

3

Metal Working Machine

1

16.7

4

Other wheeled means of transport

1

16.7

5

Other equipment

1

16.7

5.1.4 Nature-wise : Nature of injury analysis of the fatal injuries reveals that 50% are due to Other unspecified injuries while Effect of Electric Current and Multiple Injuries cover 33.3% and 16.7%, respectively. Table-4 shows the nature-wise fatal injuries.

TABLE – 4
NATURE WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Nature of Injury

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Multiple Injuries

1

16.7

2

Effect of electric current

2

33.3

3

Other unspecified injuries

3

50.0

5.1.5 Location-wise : Unspecified location of injury caused 50% of the total fatal injuries, location-wise, while, Head, Lower Limb and Multiple Location each covered 16.7%. Location-wise fatal accidents are shown in Table-5.

TABLE – 5
LOCATION WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Location of Injury

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Lower limb

1

16.7

2

Unspecified location of injury

3

50.0

3

Head

1

16.7

4

Multiple locations

1

16.6

5.1.6 Age and Sex wise : A total of 6 people have met with fatal accident, of these all are male. Out of above 6 fatal accidents, 5 were from the age group 18-36 whereas one was in between 36 to 51 years of age group. All the workers met with fatal injury were insured. Table-6 shows all the above details.

TABLE – 6(A)
SEX-WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Sex

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Male

6

100

2

Female

0

0

TABLE – 6(B)
INSURED/UNINSURED FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Insured/Uninsured

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Insured

6

100

2

Uninsured

0

0

TABLE – 6(C)
AGE-WISE FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Age

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

18 to < 36

5

83.3

2

36 to < 51

1

16.7

5.2 NON-FATAL INJURIES

A total of 159 non-fatal occupational injuries have been reported by 17 industries in the State of Goa. The of accidents and injuries were done according to the IS : 3786-1983 and also ILO Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases.

5.2.1 Industry-wise: The industry-wise analysis of non-fatal injuries shows that 25.16% of the accidents are in the Basic Metals and Alloyed manufacturing industry and 20.14% are in the industries manufacturing Transport Equipment and Parts and 18.56% in Rubber, plastic, Petroleum and Coal Products manufacturing industries. Table -7 shows the industry-wise non-fatal injuries.

TABLE – 7
INDUSTRY-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Industry

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Food products

4

2.44

2

Beverage, tobacco and tobacco products

3

1.92

3

Cotton textiles

7

4.40

4

Textile products

1

0.06

5

Paper products

1

0.60

6

Chemicals and chemical products

13

8.14

7

Rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products

28

18.56

8

Non-metallic products

1

0.60

9

Basic metal and alloyed products

40

25.16

10

Metal products and parts

7

4.40

11

Machinery and machine tool

1

0.60

12

Electrical parts/electronic machinery and parts

10

6.00

13

Transport equipment and parts

32

20.14

14

Other manufacturing industries

1

0.60

15

Repair of capital goods

8

5.00

16

Wholesale trade, fuel and petroleum

1

0.60

17

Repair services

1

0.60

18

Storages and warehousing services

--

--

5.2.2 Age and Sex-wise : Of the injured, all were male. Injuries were high (62.26%) in the age group 18 – 61, followed by 35.22% in the age group 36-51 whereas 2.52% was in the age group 51-61. 95% of the injured were insured and 5% uninsured. Table-8 gives details of injuries age and sex-wise.

TABLE – 8(A)
SEX-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Sex

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Male

159

100

2

Female

0

0

TABLE – 8(B)
INSURED/UNINSURED NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Insured/Uninsured

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Insured

151

95

2

Uninsured

8

5

TABLE – 8(C)
AGE-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Age

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

15 to < 18

--

--

2

18 to < 36

99

62.26

3

36 to < 51

56

35.22

4

51 to < 61

4

02.52

5

61 & above

--

--

5.2.3 Cause-wise : Cause-wise analysis of the non-fatal injuries shows that 37.10% of the accidents are due to stepping, striking and struck against objects, 21.40% due to caught in between objects, 15.74% due to fall of objects and 15.10% due to fall of persons. Table-9 shows the cause-wise non-fatal injuries.

TABLE – 9
CAUSE-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Type of Accidents

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Fall of persons

24

15.10

2

Fall of objects

25

15.74

3

Stepping, striking and struck against

59

37.10

4

Caught in between objects

34

21.40

5

Over exertion or wrong movement

1

0.63

6

Exposure to or contact with extreme temperature

6

3.75

7

Exposure to or contact with electric objects

1

0.63

8

Exposure to or contact with harmful substance

9

5.65

5.2.4 Agency-wise : The Indian Standard 3786 : 1983 which is as comprehensive as the ILO Code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accident and Diseases has been used to

The analysis of the non-fatal injuries shows that other material and substances is the major agency contributing to 23.29% of the injuries and other machines as well as Tools, implements and appliances have contributed 13.22% of the injuries each.

TABLE – 10
AGENCY-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Agency

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Prime movers

8

5.02

2

Transmission machines

7

4.40

3

Metal working machines

10

6.29

4

Wood and associated machines

3

1.88

5

Other machines

21

13.22

6

Other wheeled means of transport

4

2.51

7

Other means of transport

--

--

8

Pressure vessels

2

1.26

9

Electrical installations

3

1.88

10

Tools, implements and appliances

21

13.22

11

Ladders, mobile ramps

6

3.78

12

Scaffolding

6

3.78

13

Other equipment

12

7.54

14

Explosives

1

0.63

15

Dust, gases, liquid and chemicals

11

6.90

16

Flying objects

7

4.40

17

Other material and substances

37

23.29

5.2.5 Location-wise : According to IS 3786 : 1983 and ILO Code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases, the location of injury has been divided into 9 categories. 65% of the injuries have occurred in the upper limb region comprising of shoulder, upper arm, elbow, fore-arm, wrist, hand and fingers. This is followed by injuries in lower limb region 17.6% and 7% each for Multiple locations and injuries in Unspecified locations. Table-11 shows the distribution of injuries location-wise.

TABLE – 11
LOCATION-WISE NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Location Of Injury

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Head

6

3.77

2

Neck

--

--

3

Trunk

--

--

4

Upper limb

103

64.78

5

Lower limb

28

17.61

6

Multiple locations

11

6.92

7

General injuries

--

--

8

Unspecified locations

11

6.92

5.2.6 Nature-wise Injury : Nature of injury according to IS 3786 is

Non-fatal injuries in the state have been found to be mainly by the nature of wounds like lacerations, cuts, contusion with wounds, scalp wounds, etc. superficial injuries contributed to the highest, i.e. 39% followed by Dislocations contributing to13.2% and burns- 11.3%, other unspecified injuries 8.2%, contusions, other wounds and fractures 7% each of the total injuries. Table-12 gives the nature of injury-wise distribution.

TABLE – 12
DISTRIBUTION OF NON-FATAL INJURIES

S.No.

Nature of injury

No. of Accidents

Percentage

1

Fracture

11

6.92

2

Dislocations

21

13.21

3

Sprains and strains

2

1.26

4

Amputations and encleations

5

3.14

5

Other wounds

11

6.92

6

Superficial injuries

62

38.99

7

Contusions and crushings

11

6.92

8

Burns

18

11.32

9

Acute poisoning

1

0.63

10

Multiple injury of different nature

4

2.51

11

Others and unspecified injuries

13

8.18

5.5 COMPUTATION OF FREQUENCY, SEVERITY AND INCIDENT RATES

5.3.1 Frequency Rate (FR) : The Frequency Rate is calculated for the number of reportable

5.3.2 Severity Rate (SR) : The Severity Rate is calculated on the basis of man-days lost due to reportable

5.3.3 Incidence Rate (IR) : The general Incidence Rate is taken as the ratio of the number of injuries to the number of persons employed during the period of review and is expressed as per thousand persons employed. The IR for all types of injuries in the State of Goa for the year 2000 is 4.49. Industry-wise FR, SR and IR are given in the table

Accident = Reportable

FR = Total No. of Accidents x 106

Total Man-Hour Worked

SR = Total No. of Man-days lost x 106

Total Man-Hour Worked

IR = Total No. of Accidents x 1000

Total No. of Persons Employed

TABLE – 13

Sr. No.

Industry

FR

SR

IR

1

Food products

0.75

17.80

1.18

2

Beverage

0.72

9.0

1.67

3

Cotton Textile

17.80

160.35

50.95

4

Textile product

0.45

3.60

1.10

5

Paper product

0.33

2.32

0.92

6

Chemicals and chemical products

0.59

12.76

1.52

7

Rubber, plastic, petroleum & Coal Products

4.50

49.99

11.52

8

Non-metallic products

0.48

85.58

1.04

9

Basic metals and alloys

6.83

251.20

16.58

10

Metal production and parts

5.03

158.86

11.90

11

Machinery, machine tools and parts

0.56

6.18

1.44

12

Electrical/electronic

1.85

40.96

4.41

13

Transport equipment and parts

3.18

59.14

8.23

14

Other manufacturing industries

0.25

4.90

0.53

15

Repair of capital goods

3.35

45.73

9.66

16

Wholesale trade

2.54

45.81

5.84

17

Repair services

2.28

13.67

5.20

5.4 ACCIDENTS IN MAH FACTORIES

The State of Goa has 10 working MAH Units, employing 3252 persons. Out of these 3087 are male and 165 are female workers. There have been no fatal injuries except a few non-fatal injuries in these units. None of the injury involved fire, explosion and toxic release.

Occupational diseases and poisoning in manufacturing activities

OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES POISONING IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES

ILO Code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases defines Occupational Diseases as “a disease contracted as a result of an exposure to risk factors arising from work activity”. Under Section 89 of the Factories Act, 1948 where any worker in a factory contracts any disease specified in the Third Schedule (Annexure-I), the Manager of the factory shall send a notice thereof to such authorities and in such form and within such time as may be prescribed.

Also any medical practitioner attending on a person who is or has been employed in a factory and is suffering from diseases specified in the Third Schedule shall without delay send a report in writing to the office of the Chief Inspector of Factories.

In the State of Goa, no occupational disease case has been reported to the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers. However, the ESIC which deals with compensation to the workers for any loss while working in the factory has NIL cases of occupational diseases as per the Employees State Insurance Corporation (ESIC) Act, 1948 during the year 2000.

The occupational diseases results in loss of earning capacity of the workers. This loss varies according to the occupational diseases contracted by the worker. The severity of the disease may result in permanent disability to the worker. However, there was no case of occupational disease or permanent disability due to injury during the period 2000.

Management of occupational safety and health at unit level

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT UNIT LEVEL

This Chapter, as is evident, deals with the management of occupational safety and health at the unit level, i.e. manufacturing units. The state has a total of 586 manufacturing units, the break-up of which according to factories registered under Section 2(m), Section 85 of the Factories Act, 1948 is given in Chapter-4. In order to have a fair idea, about the safety and health status in these units, the following aspects on safety and health have been converted under this Chapter:

  • Safety Policy
  • Appointment of Safety Officers
  • Safety Committee
  • Occupational health centers (FMO, Ambulance)
  • Welfare (WO, Canteen, Crèche, Lunch Room, Shelter, etc.)
  • On-site Emergency Plans
  • Safety Reports
  • Safety Audits
  • HAZOP Studies

There are certain statutory requirements as provided under the Factories Act, 1948 and Rules framed thereunder, for each of the aspect stated above. Items 7.6 to 7.9 are additional requirement exclusively applicable to MAH installations which are covered by separate set of rules. Each of aspect with its status has been discussed in the following paragraphs.

7.1 SAFETY POLICY

The Rule 90(B) of the Goa Factory Rules, 1985, amended (1990) framed under the provisions of Sections 7A(3), 41-B(2) and 112 requires preparation of a written statement of policy in respect of health and safety of workers at work by the factories meeting the following criteria:

  • Units covered under Section 2(m)(i) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.
  • Units covered under Section 2(m)(ii) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 100 workers.
  • Units covered under Section 87 of the Factories Act, 1948.
  • Units covered under Section 2(cb) of the Factories Act, 1948.

In addition to the above, the Chief Inspector may require the occupier of any of the factories or >

As per the details available 356 units were required preparation of Safety Policy. However, only 24 units have prepared the Safety Policy which is about 6.74% of the total requirement.

7.2 APPOINTMENT OF SAFETY OFFICERS

As per the provisions of Section 40-B of the Factories Act, 1948, Safety Officer is required to be appointed for the units meeting the following criteria:

7.2.1

  • Units employing more than 1000 workers,
  • Wherein in the opinion of the State Government, any manufacturing process or operation is carried on involving any risk of bodily injury, poisoning or diseases or any hazard to health.

As per the details available, 4 Safety Officers were required to be appointed in the units in the State. As against this, 10 Safety Officers were appointed in various units.

7.3 SAFETY COMMITTEE

The Rule 90 of the Goa Factory Rules, 1985 framed under the provisions of Section 41 and 41-G of the Factories Act, 1948 requires constitution of Safety Committee in the factories meeting the following criteria:

  • Units employing 250 or more workers.
  • Units covered under Section 87 of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.
  • Units covered under Section 2(cb) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.

As per the information available, 210 units have constituted Safety Committees.

7.4 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CENTERS

As per Rule 90(O) of the Goa Factory Rules, 1985 amended (1990) prescribed under Section 41-C of the Factories Act, 1948, Occupational Health Centers are required to be set up in the factories carrying on ‘hazardous process’ as described under Section 2(cb) of the Act. The industries have been divided into 3 categories, i.e. the industries employing up to 50 workers, employing 51 – 200 workers and employing more than 200 workers. No information is available regarding requirement and establishment of Occupational Health Centers in factories. However, in 2 factories submitting complete annual returns, ambulance rooms have been set up.

7.5 WELFARE

This part of the Chapter deals with the Welfare facilities, e.g. appointment of Welfare Officers, crèche facilities, canteen facilities, shelters, rest room and lunch room.

As per the provisions of Section 49 of the Factories Act, 1948, any factory employing more than 500 workers, is required to employ a Welfare Officer. As per the details available 3 units were required to appoint the Welfare Officers. However, 3 units have actually appointed the Welfare Officers.

As per the provisions under Section 48 of the Factories Act, 1948, any factory employing 30 or more women workers are required to provide crèche facilities for the use of children below the age of 6 years for the women employees. There are certain requirements under the Section for these crèches which are to be met by the occupier of the factory. In total 53 units are required to provide crèche facility and out of these only 2 units have provided the crèche facilities.

As per the provisions under Section 47 of the Factories Act, 1948, any factory employing more than 150 workers is required to provide adequate and suitable>

As per the details available 34 units have provided the shelters or rest rooms and lunch room facilities.

As per the provisions under Section 46 of the Factories Act, 1948 any factory employing more than 250 workers is required to provide canteen facilities for the use of workers.

As per the details available, 48 units have provided canteen facilities.

As stated earlier, items 7.6 to 7.9 are the additional items exclusively applicable to Major Accident Hazard units. There are a total of 10 working MAH units in the state. The statutory requirement for the units are covered by “The Goa Control of Major Industrial Accident Hazard Rules, 1993, as amended in 1999”.

7.6 ON-SITE EMERGENCY PLANS

As per the provision under “The Goa Control of Major Industrial Accident Hazard Rules, 1993, as amended in 1999”, an occupier who has control of the industrial activity, as described under the Rule, shall prepare an On-site emergency plan detailing how major accidents will be dealt with on the site on which industrial activity is carried on.

As per the information available 10 number of MAH installations were required to prepare the on-site emergency plan. All the 10 MAH installations have prepared the plans and submitted to the Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers.

7.7 & 7.8 SAFETY REPORTS AND SAFETY AUDITS

As per the provisions under “The Goa Control of Major Industrial Accident Hazard Rules, 1993, as amended in 1999”, it is mandatory for an occupier to prepare and submit to the Chief Inspector before the commencement of an industrial activity, the Safety Report of the industrial activity to which these rules apply. The Safety Report is to be submitted in the prescribed format. Further it is advisable that all the units after the commencement of the industrial activity shall carry out an independent Safety Audit of the respective industrial activities with the help of an expert not associated with such industrial activities. This will help the management to know the weak points in their system and to take suitable>

As per the information available, 4 numbers of units were required to prepare Safety Report and all the 4 units have prepared the Safety Report and submitted to the Chief Inspector of Factories & Boilers. Further, 4 units have carried out safety audit and submitted reports to the Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers.

7.9 RISK ASSESSMENT STUDIES

The HAZOP Studies, i.e. the Hazard and Operability studies are carried out in advance on any plant to examine the process or at least the relevant parts of the process to discover how deviation from the intention of design can occur to decide whether such deviations can give rise to hazardous conditions.

The technique aims to simulate the imagination of designer in a systematic way and is useful in identifying potential hazards in advance and allow the user to take corrective measures.

However, no information is available about the units which have conducted risk assessment studies.

Management of occupational safety and health at state levels

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT STATE LEVEL

Management of Safety and Health at the state level is more complex than at the unit level. At unit level, the problems are relatively simple and unit specific depending upon the type of industry. However, at the state level management of safety and health is not unit or industry specific and the instruments such as policies, legislation, etc. are required to be more comprehensive to take care of safety and health issues in all type of occupations. Apart from the Factories Act, 1948, there are other legislations for providing a better work environment, safety, health and welfare facilities. These legislations are enforced by various state government agencies such as Directorates of Factories and Boilers, Labour Commissioner, etc.

Education and training pays an important role in management of safety and health at state level and thus cannot be neglected. Non-government organizations (NGOs), voluntary organizations, institutions and agencies engaged in safety and health are contributing in their own way towards the objective for giving the workers a safe and healthy work environment.

Safety and health at work is governed by variety of statutes in the state depending on the nature of work place, manufacturing activity and specific aspect of safety and health. Some of the important statutes are given below:

  • The Factories Act, 1948
  • The Goa, Daman Diu Factories Rules, 1985
  • The Indian Boilers Act, 1923
  • The Goa, Daman Diu Boiler Rules, 1983
  • The Goa, Daman Diu Boiler Operation Engineer’s Rules, 1983
  • The Goa, Daman Diu Boiler Attendants’ Rules, 1983
  • The Goa, Daman Diu Economisers’ Rules, 1982
  • The Indian Boiler Rules
  • The Dangerous Machine (Regulations) Act.
  • The Child Labour (Prohibition Regulation) Act
  • The Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules, 1989
  • The Goa Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazard Rules, 1993
  • The Chemical Accidents (Emergency Planning Preparedness) Rules.

There are different departments of Central Government and State Government entrusted with the responsibility of enforcement of these statutes. The efforts of the enforcement agencies are also supplemented by other organizations such as training and research institutions, employers’ associations, employees associations, etc. in promoting occupational safety and health in the state.

8.1 INSPECTORATE OF FACTORIES AND BOILERS

This Inspectorate, under the Department of Labour and Rehabilitation at State Secretariat is looking after safety, health and environment of workers employed in factories. The Inspectorate is headed by the Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers. In the state of Goa, the Factories and Boilers are under the same Inspectorate unlike many other states in the country where the Boilers are looked after by the Chief Inspector of Boilers and the Factories are looked after by the Chief Inspector of Factories. Thus in the State of Goa, the Inspectorate of Factories have to look after the enforcement of Factories Act, 1948 as well as the Indian Boilers Act, 1923. The Inspectors with mechanical engineering background are also Boiler Inspectors.

8.1.1 Infrastructure Facilities

Under the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers, there is Institute of Safety, Occupational Health and Environment. The Institute houses the following:

The Safety Demonstration Centre which has been well furnished and illustrates how the workers’ safety and health are affected by the hazards in the work environment, and also demonstrates the most effective safety methods.

The Audiovisual Centre which is equipped with modern equipment and its film library is, perhaps, the largest single film library under Government aegis in the country. It has about 215 titles on various subjects of industrial safety, health, hygiene and first aid.

The Library-cum-Information Centre with an area of 140 sq. mts. aims at providing information on the latest advances made in the field of safety, occupational health and environment. An appropriate collection of books is being made, and other documentation facilities have also been provided. The present collection of books on safety, occupational health and environmental pollution control is around 4500, costing Rs.20 lakhs approximately.

Conference Hall is well furnished and has a sitting capacity for 40 persons.

The Seminar and Lecture Halls have the required facilities for conducting training programmes, seminars, workshops, etc., allowing two programmes to be held simultaneously.

The Institute also has Mobile Occupational Health Laboratory for covering pre-employment and periodical medical examination in the factories. The Institute also has a Mobile Industrial Hygiene Laboratory for surveying and monitoring of work environment.

8.1.2 Employment and Area Covered

The Inspectorate is having a strength of 68 personnel as given in the organization chart (enclosed) and the whole State of Goa is under the jurisdiction of this Inspectorate.

8.1.3 Strength of the Inspectorate

The Inspectorate is manned by 68 personnel as given below:

  • Group ‘A’ : 02
  • Group ‘B’ : 04
  • Group ‘C’ : 43
  • Group ‘D’ : 19

The Department functions under the Secretary (Factories Boilers) who reports to the Minister (Factories Boilers). The Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers is also the Ex-Officio Joint Secretary and is assisted by one Inspector of Factories, one Inspector of Boilers, one Medical Inspector of Factories, one Chemist and one Programme Officer. The Organisation chart is enclosed separately.

8.1.4 Main functions of the Inspectorate

Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers is a statutory Government Body entrusted with the Enforcement of two technical acts, viz. The Factories Act, 1948 and the Indian Boilers Act, 1923 and the State Rules thereunder.

Very recently the part Enforcement of Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 and the Child Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Act, 1986 are also entrusted to the Inspectorate. The Department also envisages taking an active role in the enforcement of Building and other Construction Workers (Regulation of Employment and Conditions of Service) Act, 1996.

The Factories Act, 1948 mainly aims at regulating the working conditions in factories which embrace inter-alia, safety, health and welfare aspects.

The Indian Boilers Act, 1923 regulates the safe working of “Fired Pressure Vessels”. The implementation of the Act, therefore, involves registration of boilers, their periodical inspections, etc.

The proposed inclusion of Construction Safety will mainly regulate safety, health and welfare aspects of the Construction workers. Framing of the State Rules under the Central Legislation in consultation with Director General of Factory Advice Service and Central Labour Institute, Ministry of Labour is on the anvil.

The Department is headed by the Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, who reports directly to the Secretary (Factories and Boilers).

The different activities undertaken by the Inspectorate are given below:

8.1.4.1 Inspection and Prosecution

95 Inspections were carried out, 7 prosecution cases were launched and 18 accident investigations were done during the year 2000.

8.1.4.2 Promotional Activities

The Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers is involved in safety promotional activities such as screening of safety films, celebration of National Safety Day and Safety Week.

The Institute of Safety, Occupational Health and Environment is engaged in conducting non-academic training programmes/ courses on industrial safety, first aid, special programmes on different topics and specialized industry-need tailor-made programmes.

The Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers is supporting the non-governmental organization called Green Triangle Society which is dedicated to the Safety, Health and Environment.

8.1.4.3 Important Activities

  • As on December, 2000 the total registered factories were 837, wherein total working factories were 586 and workers employed were 36731.
  • Incidence rate of accidents per 1000 workers employed in factories was 5 as compared to the national level as 11.32.
  • Training programmes on safety, first aid, etc. including special programmes conducted during the year were 58, covering more than 1000 participants.
  • 11 (Eleven) surveys were conducted under the Industrial Hygiene Surveillance activity undertaken by the department.
  • Medical checks of 340 factory workers were conducted under the Occupational Health Surveillance programme.
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Environmental Pollution Control Technology was conducted for 13 students.
  • Revenue collected from different sources during the year was Rs.7.85 lakhs.

8.1.5 Inspection Activities

The State of Goa has a total of 632 registered factories out of which all are registered under Section 2(m) of the Factories Act, 1948. The Inspectors from the Inspectorate inspected 92 factories registered under Section 2(m). 7 Factories under Ministry of Defence were also inspected under Section 2(m) of the Factories Act, 1948.

8.1.6 Prosecutions and Convictions

The Chapter 10 of the Factories Act provides for penalties and procedures for violation of the provisions. The analysis shows that the prosecutions have been carried out under Section 92 of the Factories Act. The Section 92 of the Factories Act speaks about the general penalties for offences.

During the year 2000, 632 factories registered under Section 2(m). There were 7 convictions under section 92.

OFFICE OF THE LABOUR COMMISSIONER

8.2.1 Objectives

The office of the Commissioner, Labour is assigned with the duties and functions relating to Industrial Relations, Labour Welfare, Enforcement of Labour Legislative besides Implementation of Labour Welfare and Social Security Schemes. The officials in the Labour Department are also appointed and declared as authorities performing quasi-judicial executive functions under various Labout Legislations of both the Central and State Government.

8.2.2 Functions

In order to achieve the aims and objectives, the office ensures administration of balanced industrial relations, strict enforcement of Labour Legislation, ensuring welfare benefits under the statute to workmen in both organized and unorganized sector equally, timely revision of minimum rates of wages in Scheduled Employment and their proper enforcement.

The office has also increased the activities towards Labour Welfare by setting up of Labour Welfare Centres, so also as a result of enactment of Labour Welfare Fund Act, which was brought into force with effect from July, 1992 in the State of Goa. 15 Welfare Schemes are being implemented which is a noteworthy achievement in the history of Labour Welfare of the State. The Schemes have awarded monetary benefits to workers in the lower brackets of income, thus attaining the twin objectives of Labour and Social Welfare.

8.2.3 Organization Structure

The Department is headed by the Commissioner, Labour and Employment and supported by One Additional Labour Commissioner. There is one Deputy Labour Commissioner and five Assistant Labour Commissioners for the whole state. The organization structure is given below:

organization
Sl. No.CategoryNo. of Personnel
1Group “A”4
2Group “B”7
3Group “C”82
4Group “D”9
TOTAL102

8.2.4 Activities

The major activity of this department is to see the welfare of the labour, working in all the occupations in the State of Goa. The activities include enforcement of the following Acts:

  • Minimum Wages Act (Agriculture)
  • Minimum Wages Act
  • Shop and Commercial Establishment Act
  • Contract Labour Act
  • Payment of Wages Act
  • Equal Remuneration Act
  • Motor Transport Workers Act
  • Maternity Benefit Act
  • Child Labour Act
  • Inter-state Migrant Workers Act
  • Payment of Bonus Act
  • Labour Welfare Fund Act

The enforcement of the above Acts aims to make available all the benefits to the workers engaged in different occupations and maintain the environment of peace and harmony in the industrial, construction and service sectors.

8.2.5 Areas Covered

The entire State of Goa which covers two districts, namely, North Goa and South Goa.

8.2.6 Physical Achievement in 2000

SCHEME-WISE PHYSICAL ACHIEVEMENTS
Sl. NoName of the Scheme Detailed ProgrammeAchievements In 2000
ISTRENGTHENING OF LABOUR ADMINISTRATION DIRECTION AND ADMINISTRATION 
Industrial Unrest Due to Strike/Lockouts
1Strikes7
i)Mandays lost due to strikes41138
2Lockouts--
ii)Mandays lost due to strikes--
3Industrial Employment Standing Order Acts 
i)Cases certified1
ii)Workmen covered27
4Contract Labour (Regulation and Abolition) Acts, 1970 
i)Contractors granted licences78
ii)Workmen employed2439
5Shops and Establishments Act, 1973 
i)No. of shops and establishment registered during the year1325
6Minimum Wages Act, 1940 
i)Revision of minimum wages done in schedule employment4
7No. of Registration under Motor Transport Workers Act234
8No. of Industrial Disputes received288
9Industrial Disputes settled in the course of conciliation machinery (12-3)127
10Cases disposed off under Workmen compensation Act, 1923110
Act-wise Inspections carried out
1Shops and Establishment Act2155
2SE under Section 15--
3Minimum Wages Act816
4Minimum Wages Act (Agriculture)15
5Payment of Wages Act291
6Motor Transport Workers Act60
7Contract Labour Act314
8Payment of Bonus Act191
9Equal Remuneration Act290
10Inter State Migrant Workmen Act19
11Child Labour Act25
12Labour Welfare Fund Act480
Total4656
IISETTING UP OF INDUSTRIAL TRIBUNAL CUM LABOUR COURT
1Award passed by the Labour Court58
2Claims disposed off83
IIISETTING UP OF LABOUR WELFARE CENTRES FOR INDUSTRIAL WORKERS 
1Total no. of Welfare Centres/Welfare Centres functioning17
2Students trained596
8.3 DAPARTMENT OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT

8.3.1 Organisation : The Department is headed by the Director. The Goa State Pollution Control Board (GSPCB), Goa Coastal Zone Management Authority (GCZMA), Goa State Council of Science and Technology (GSCST), Goa Energy Development Agency (GEDA) and Goa Environment Protection Council (GEPC) are statutory/advisory authorities, under the purview of the Department, which implement the various legislations pertaining to pollution control/environmental protection and other activities of the Department aimed at promotion of science and technology and implementation of non-conventional and renewable energy programmes.

8.3.2 Facilities:

  • State Remote Sensing Center : This functions in the DSTE premises at Saligao under the auspices of GSCST and has the facilities for visual and digital interpretation of satellite data products. It is equipped with a state-of-the-art Geographical Information System (GIS) and Digital Image Processing (DIP) work stations.
  • Goa Science Centre, Miramar : A Science Museum and Science Park have been established at Miramar (Panaji) in collaboration with the National Council of Science Museums (Calcutta). This is scheduled for public opening during the 2nd Semester of the year 2001.
  • Amateurs’ Astronomical Observatory : This is located in Junta House (Panaji) and managed by the DSTE through a reputed NGO, viz. Association of Friends of Astronomy (AFA). The entrance is free and the viewing timings are 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. on weekdays during the months of November to May. Lectures, seminars and outreach programmes are organized.
  • Oceanarium : A state-of-the-art Oceanarium, first of its kind in South Asia, is being set up on a Build, Own, Operate and Manage (BOOM) basis through a Consortium of an Australian and an Indian firm at Miramar (Panaji). It is scheduled for completion in the year 2002.
  • Glass Houses : One Glass House for research work has been opened at Goa University Campus (Taleigao) and the other for commercial purposes at Chimbel under the auspices of Goa State Horticulture Corporation.
  • Facilities at DSTE Premises Saligao:
    • Library
    • Exhibits on non-conventional energy sources
    • A Non-conventional Energy Park, which is nearing completion
    • Exhibits on Space Science
    • Electronic Test and Development Centre which offers courses in computer education, information technology and provides calibration services for industries.

8.3.3 Activities : Regular and periodic activities undertaken by the DSTE to achieve its objectives are as under:

  • Promotion of appropriate ST and environmental projects relevant to the needs of the State
  • Application of Remote Sensing Technology for management of natural resources and planning.
  • Implementation of science popularization and environmental awareness drives
  • Organisation and promotion of scientific exhibitions, seminars and workshops.
  • Publication of papers, brouchers and books, etc. relevant to ST.
  • Drafting of environmental legislations proposed by the Government.
  • Nodal action to implement State/Central Acts/Legislations on environmental and pollution control through the respective enforcement authorities.
  • Popularization and dissemination on non-conventional and renewable energy sources.

The Department of Science, Technology and Environment has a well maintained library having a number of publications in the field of Science, Technology and Environment. Beside these publications, library has a good collection of video cassettes and films. The Department has also been publishing a number of booklet/brochures on environment.

8.4 GOA STATE POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD

8.4.1 Introduction : The Goa State Pollution Control Board has been constituted on 1-7-1988 under the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974. Prior to that in the erstwhile Union Territory Goa, Daman and Diu, the Central Board for the Prevention and Control of Water Pollution was performing the functions of the State oard in Goa. A section office was established by the Central Board at Ponda-Goa for the purpose. The same arrangement was continued till constitution of the State Board. In the meanwhile, the Section Office of the Central Board was shifted to Baroda on 4th April, 1988, to reconstitute it as a West Zonal Office. All the relevant records pertaining to Goa were transferred to the Goa State Pollution Control Board on 12th September, 1988.

The Goa State Pollution Control Board, after constitution established its office at Bambolim in Goa Medical College Complex. In June, 1991, the Government of Goa allotted an independent premises for the Board at Patto-Panaji, where the Board office was shifted in September, 1991.

8.4.2 Activities of the Board Including Various Functions:

Functions Performed under the Act: The functions of the State Board as specified in the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981:

Functions under the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974:

  • to plan a comprehensive programme for the prevention, control or abatement of pollution of streams and wells in the State and to secure the execution thereof;
  • to advice the State Government on any matter concerning the prevention, control or abatement of water pollution;
  • to collect and disseminate information relating to water pollution and the prevention, control or abatement thereof;
  • to encourage, conduct and participate in investigations and research relating to problems of water pollution and prevention, control or abatement of water pollution;
  • to collaborate with the Central Board in organizing the training of persons engaged or to the engaged in programmes relating to prevention, control or abatement of water pollution and to organize mass education programmes relating thereto;
  • to inspect sewage or trade effluents, works and plants for the treatment of sewage and trade effluents and to review plants, specifications or other data relating to plants set up for the treatment of water, works for the purification thereof and the system for the disposal of sewage or trade effluents or in connection with the grant of consent as required by this Act;
  • to lay down, modify or annual effluent standards for the sewage and trade effluents and for the quality of receiving waters (not being water in an interstate stream) resulting from the discharge of effluents and to >

  • for the prevention, control or abatement of discharge of waste into streams or wells;
  • to advise the State Government with respect to the location of any industry the carrying on of which is likely to pollute a stream or well;
  • to perform such other functions as may be prescribed or may, from time to time, be entrusted to it by the Central Board or the State Government.

Functions under the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981:

  • to plan a comprehensive programme for the prevention, control or abatement of air pollution and to secure the execution thereof;
  • to advise the State Government on any matter concerning the prevention, control, or abatement of air pollution;
  • to collect and disseminate information relating to air pollution;
  • to collaborate with the Central Board in organizing the training of persons engaged or to be engaged in programmes relating to prevention, control or abatement of air pollution and to organize mass education programme relating thereof;
  • to inspect, at all reasonable times, any control equipment, the prevention, control or abatement of air pollution in such areas the prevention, control or abatement of air pollution in such areas; such directions to such persons as it may consider necessary to take steps for the prevention, control or abatement of air pollution;
  • to advise the State Government with respect to the suitability of any premises or location for carrying on any industry which is likely to cause air pollution.

8.4.3 Objectives and Approach : The functions listed above are directed towards the effective control of water and air pollution and thus to maintain and restore, wherever necessary the wholesomeness of water for various designated best uses and to preserve the quality of air as per requirement of ambient air quality. The Goa State Pollution Control Board aims to achieve these objectives through:

* Control on quality effluents and emissions from existing industrial units by periodical analysis of their effluent and emission samples.

* Maintain suitable>

* Developing Data Base to prepare water use and water quality maps and air quality zoning.

8.5 DIRECTORATE OF INDUSTRIES AND MINES

8.5.1 Introduction : The Directorate of Industries and Mines looks after the promotion, development and regulation of industries and mines in the State of Goa. Goa, with a geographical area of 3702 square kilometers has about 6007 industrial units and 18 industrial estates as on 31st October, 2000.

The Stare of Goa with its rich cultural and spiritual heritage has emerged as an industrially and commercially significant State. The Government Industrial Policy has added momentum to the process of industrialization and a significant number of entrepreneurs have been attracted for starting new industries.

The Government has also given more areas for development of industrial growth by encouraging eco-friendly non-polluting and employment oriented industries. The much awaited draft Industrial Policy announced by the Government is passing through the process of finalization. The various initiatives by the Government of Goa, like recent procurement of Information, Technology Policy, clearing subsidy dues of SSIs Special Economic Zone, Power Sector Reforms, etc. are likely to increase the pace of Industrial Development with a new dimension.

8.5.2 Small Scale Industries (SSI) : After attainment of statehood in 1987, there has been spectacular growth in small scale industries sector. During the period 1987 to 1999, while the number of units and employment generation has nearly doubled, there has been a four fold increase in investment.

During the IXth Five Year Plan, a large number of SSIs were set up in this State. The total approved outlay for industries was Rs.3,600 lakhs out of which Rs.2,855 lakhs were earmarked for the development of SSIs. A review of efforts made by the Administration during the IXth Five Year Plan for the industrialization programme reveals that the State is marching confidently towards its goal of progress. It is reflected both in the increased number of units as also in the range of products. With the numerous facilities and incentives provided by the Government and other financial institutions, sufficient encouragement has been provided to the entrepreneurs. Statistical facts and figures show that the units registered upto 31-03-2001 stands at 6,157 SSI Units and 138 large and medium industries.

The range of products has diversified which include electronics, pharmaceuticals and light engineering goods. A large number of products that are frequently required in our day-to-day modern life have also been added, viz. emergency electronic lamps, food preservative chemicals, assembling of cinema projectors, hose pipes, leather items, brass metal lamps, spectacle frames, pesticides, drugs, pharmaceuticals, nylon fishing nets, capacitors, stern gear and propellers, coir defibring, ready made garments, audio visual equipment, assembly of watches, T.V. sets, computer, plastic furniture, diamond impregnated saws, segments wire boards, HDPE sacks, etc.

8.5.3 Mining Sector : Mining is the backbone of the Goa economy and it also earns substantial foreign exchange. There are 418 mining leases in this State. Besides, there are 405 quarries for minor minerals. The iron ore is mainly exported. The annual exports are of the order of 15 million tones valued at over Rs.619 crores approximately. Though Goa’s area is negligible compared to the country’s area, yet, it accounts for about 33% of the country’s production of iron ore and 55% of its exports.

Mining activity in the State of Goa has been instrumental in the environmental degradation. A number of agricultural lands situated in the vicinity of the mines get affected on account of flow of mining waste. In such cases, the compensation is usually sorted out amicably by the mining companies and the aggrieved parties. However, in some cases where there is no amicable settlement, complaints are received in this office on account of damage to the properties.

The mining belt is divided into three regions based on the concentration of iron ore – the northern zone, the central zone and the southern zone. Usgao river is the dividing line between the northern and the central zones and the Sanguem river between the central and the southern zones. The maximum area under mining leases is in Sanguem Taluka followed by Bicholim, Satari and Quepem. Analysis of the surface area utilization of these four talukas reveals that in Sanguem forest area occupies the largest area while in Bicholim, cultivated and orchard lands occupy the highest.

8.6 DIRECTORATE OF TRANSPORT

8.6.1 Introduction : The main functions of the Department is to regulate road transport in accordance with the provisions of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989 and Goa Motor Vehicles Rules, 1991. Under this function, the Authority vests in the Department the powers regarding Registration of Motor Vehicles, Licensing of Drivers, Conductors, Driving School Establishments, Control of Transport Vehicles and various permits for transport vehicles as also Inspection of Transport Vehicles for issue/renewal of Fitness Certificates.

The second function is collection of Motor Vehicles Tax and taxes on Passengers in accordance with the provisions of the Goa, Daman and Diu Motor Vehicles (Taxation on Passengers and Goods) Act, 1974 and recovery.

The third function is enforcement of various provisions of the M.V. Act and Rules and to check violations to bring discipline on road. Without an effective ON ROAD ENFORCEMENT, the objectives of the Act cannot be achieved.

The fourth function is development of infrastructure such as Bus Stands and other Schemes aimed at promoting Road Transport.

8.6.2 Contribution to State Income : The revenue collection of the Department for the period January to December, 2000 is Rs.33.60 crores.

8.6.3 Employment : Besides the staff employed for administrative work in the Department and its sub-offices, executive staff are also involved in maintaining discipline on road by checking traffic violation, etc. and evasion of motor vehicles taxes by enforcing various provisions of M.V. Act, 1988, Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989 and State Taxation Act and Rules. Due to the liberalization of grant of various types of permits, lot of self employment has been generated as the unemployed have been encouraged to buy vehicles to ply as public service vehicles which are being driven by owners themselves.

8.6.4 Area Covered : The Directorate of Transport is having its Head office at Junta House, Panaji manned by the Director of Transport and sub-offices at Panaji, Mapusa, Bicholim, Ponda, Margao and Vasco which are manned by the Assistant Director of Transport as Head of offices. In addition, there is a sub-office of the A.D.T. (S) Margao at Quepem, a counter at Canacona operating once in a week and camp office of the ADT, Mapusa at Pernem. Besides, there are two Enforcement Cells, North and South, also manned by the Assistant Directors of Transport as Head of Offices.

8.6.5 Accidents Occurred : The number of accidents occurred during the period January to December, 2000 is as under:

FatalNon-FatalTotal
SeriousSlightMinor
223176115814562980
8.7 DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES

8.7.1 Functions and Responsibilities

  • Creation and development of infrastructure facilities for landing and berthing of fishing vessels.
  • Registration of fishing vessels, sea going canoes, fishing crafts under M.F.R. Act.
  • Registration of fishing nets operated in Goa State.
  • Allotment of fishing stakes in the rivers, creeks of Goa State.
  • Providing financial assistance in the form of subsidies on the fishing trawlers, outboard motors, crafts, canoes, nets, fish farms, etc. and reimbursement of excise duty on H.S.D. oil consumed through Fisheries Cooperative outlets.
  • Enforcement of the Marine Fishing Regulation Act, 1981 prohibiting illegal fishing in Goa.
  • Production of Fresh Water Fish Seed and supply to the needy fishermen, stocking the same in the reservoirs/dams, tanks and other fresh water bodies.
  • Impact training to fisher youth in modern technique of fishing.
  • Conduct short term training courses in Brackish water prawn farming.
  • To regulate fishing activities in the State.
  • 8.7.2 Contribution to State Income : The production of marine and inland fish contribute significantly to the state income. The overall production of marine and inland fish in the state during the year 2000 was 73155 m. tones, valued at Rs.16839 lakhs.

    8.7.3 Employment : Around 1260 fishing trawlers/purseiners are operating in the State of Goa. In addition, around 900 motorised fishing canoes and 1900 non-mechanised traditional country crafts are also engaged in the fishing activities. The fishermen population in the State of Goa is estimated to be around 32,000 out of which 12,000 are actively engaged in the fishing activities and earn their livelihood.

    8.7.4 Area Covered : The State of Goa has got a coastline admeasuring 104 kms., 250 kms. of inland water ways and nearly 100 hectares of inland water tanks and 4000 hectares of marshy khazan lands for prawn farming.

    8.7.5 Accidents Occurred : This Department is operating a welfare scheme like Group Accident Insurance Scheme for active fishermen. Insurance premium is paid by the Government and benefits are Rs.50,000/- against death or permanent disability and Rs.25,000/- for partial disability while doing fishing. During the reference period one death incident had occurred on 26-11-2000.

    8.8 GOA, DAMAN AND DIU KHADI AND VILLAGE INDUSTRIES BOARD

    8.8.1 Introduction : The Goa, Daman and Diu Khadi and Village Industries Board is a Statutory Organisation engaged in the promotion of Village Industries and other activities under the purview of the Khadi and Village Industries Commission, Mumbai. The schematic funds for the implementation of the various schemes are provided by the KVIC, Mumbai, while the expenditure towards the establishment is borne by the Government of Goa through the Directorate of Industries as grant-in-aid.

    As laid down in the Goa, Daman and Diu Khadi and Village Industries Board Act of 1965, the Board shall consist of nine members, the majority of which shall be non-officials. In accordance with the Act, the Government has reconstituted the Board with effect from 1.3.2000. The present Board is headed by Rajesh Patnekar, M.L.A. and comprises of six non-official members and three official members.

    8.8.2 Activities : The schemes, which are implemented by the Board, are formulated by the KVIC, Mumbai. During the year 2000-01, the Board has sanctioned 509 proposals with the project cost of Rs.1041.20 lakhs and the subsidy components of Rs.254.42 lakhs. Out of the proposals recommended to the Banks, 180 proposals with the project cost of Rs.371.10 lakhs and the subsidy components of Rs.89.35 lakhs were considered for disbursement.

    8.8.3 Employment : The proposals under Margin Money Scheme are expected to generate employment to one person after every Rs.50,000/- invested in term loan. The statistics of the units financed under Margin Money Scheme for the year 2000-01 is as follows:

    1Agro based and Food Processing Industry12
    2Mineral Based Industry3
    3Forest Based Industry1
    4Engineering Group of Industry4
    5Textile Group of Industry5
    6Service Industry155
    Total180
    8.9 DIRECTORATE OF FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

    8.9.1 Main Functions : The Directorate of Fire and Emergency Services has been constituted under the Goa, Daman and Diu Fire Force Act, 1986, which provides fire and emergency cover to the State of Goa with a network of 12 Fire Stations and one Headquarters Logistics Centre at Panaji. These Fire Stations are located in the township of the respective local Bodies/Muncipalities, viz., Panaji, Mapusa, Margao (District), Margao (Town), Vasco, Curchorem, Canacone, Ponda, Old-Goa, Bicholim, Valpol and Pernem. Besides Industrial Fire Stations in major Industrial Estates, like Verna and Kundalm and a Beach Fire and Rescue Station at Calangute are also being set up imminently, making the total strength of the Fire Stations to 15 in the State of Goa.

    The main objective of the Department is primarily to prevent unwanted fires from startling and to minimize the loss of life and properly from the ravages of fire and non-fire emergencies and to provide fire protection stand by cover and carrying out ceremonial duties, besides imparting training in Fire Safety Education at undergraduate level and tailored training courses for Industry, Commerce and Service Professionals. The Fire Institute is also the Centre for Disaster Management Response Service for both man-made and natural calamities.

    8.9.2 Contribution to State Income : The contribution to the State in material terms is negligible being a Service Organisation of critical nature and hence it cannot be quantified as our objective is to save life and property of the people. We have not imposed fire tax as required, however, there is a one time cess on high rise structures based on the floor area at the rate of Rs.5/- per m2.

    8.9.3 Employment : The approved strength of the Department is approximately 500 personnel for working round the clock for the Goa State Fire and Emergency Services function in line of para military organization.

    8.9.4 Area Covered : The whole State of Goa is covered under the jurisdiction of this Department for Fire Protection and Control.

    8.9.5 Accidents Occurred : During the year, Goa Fire Services have collectively attended 1679 Fire and Emergency Calls, wherein 158 lives and property worth Rs.23.36 Crores was saved/salvaged due to timely intervention of Fire Personnel. Fire Services are often summoned to contain Emergencies involving Hazardous substances in order to defuse the situation, besides conducting rescue and relief duties during on-site Emergencies and Off-site highway motor accidents and other special services.

    8.10 DIRECTORATE OF HEALTH SERVICES

    8.10.1 Introduction :

    The Directorate of Health Services (DHS) provide primary health care and family welfare services to the public at large and particularly to those living in rural areas. Various national programmes launched deliver primary health care services and help in developing rural health infrastructure. The stress was laid in health policy programmes implemented in providing preventive, promotive, curative and rehabilitative health care services through its CHCs/PHCs and District Hospitals. Goa has one of the most extensive health systems in India as health care services are made available to the people at door steps and hence the tiny State of Goa is considered as one of the best performing state in India in the matter of Health and Medical Care as it has achieved most of the targets set for the nation for the year 2000 AD.

    As far as infrastructure of health services is concerned, there is a good network of 5 community Health Centres, 19 Primary Health Centres, 172 Sub Centres besides 27 rural medical dispensaries. Two District Hospitals, one each at North Goa and South Goa and other general/specialized hospitals with attached beds cater the need of the general public. In addition, 17 dental clinics and other special clinics for implementation of various national programmes, such as, family welfare, TB, Leprosy, STD, AIDS, Malaria, Filaria, Control of Blindness, etc. provide health care services. There are two homeopathic, one ayurvedic dispensary, 4 urban health centres and one medical dispensary also provide health and medical services. A Medical Store Depot procures necessary medicines, drugs/equipment and machineries and distribute them to the hospitals/health centres under the control of DHS as per their requirements.

    The Directorate of Health Services is headed by the Director. He is assisted by five Deputy Directors, viz. Deputy Director (Public Health), Deputy Director (Medical), Deputy Director-cum-Medical Superintendent of Asilo and Hospicio and Deputy Director (Dental). He is also assisted by Director (Administration) for administrative matters and Joint Director of Accounts for financial matters. The implementation of all the national programmes, such as, Family Welfare, MCH, TB, Malaria and Other Vector Home Diseases, Leprosy, Control of Blindness and STD are headed by CMOs. The Institute of Nursing Education is headed by a Principal. The Primary Health and Community Health Centres are manned by Health Officers/Medical Officers and assisted by trained/qualified staff and para-medical staff. The sub-centres are looked after by Health Workers, while, RMDs are manned by Rural Medical Officer.

    8.10.2 Achievement During 2000-2001 :

    During the year 2000-2001, some of the services under DHS have been strengthened. For instance, Cottage Hospital, Sanquelim and Materinity Home, Shiroda have been upgraded and are converted into a PHC Sanquelim and PHC Shiroda respectively and the bed strength of PHC Sanquelim has been increased from 15 to 30. Similarly, PHC Cansarvancm has been provided with 12 beds. The main thrust was laid on consolidation and operationalisation of all the existing health units so that their performance could be optimized. Provision of essential equipments, drugs and other requisite materials as also efforts to fill in all the vacant posts of Doctors and para-medical staff were made to ensure qualitative improvement in the delivery of Primary Health Care to the people, particularly, living in rural areas. During the year 2000-2001 about 8.00(P) lakh patients attended OPD and 0.52(P) lakh in-patients were treated in the institutions under the Directorate.

    8.10.3 Hospitals and Dispensaries :

    Efforts were made to fill in all the vacant posts of Doctors and other supporting staff in the District and other hospitals. The main thrust was laid on proper maintenance, efficient management of men, material and available resources for improving the quality of services provided in these hospitals. In order to improve the services provided at two District Hospitals (i.e. Hospicio and Asilo) in terms of quality and quantity, it is proposed to increase the bed strength of Hospicio Hospital, Margao from 230 to 320 and Asilo Hospital, Mapusa from 190 to 250 during the Ninth Plan Period.

    8.10.4 National Programmes:

    Family Welfare : In the matter of Family Welfare, Goa is one of the best performing states in India. It has one of the lowest birth rate, death rate, IMR, etc. From April, 1996 Goa has shifted from Target approach to Target Free approach with a view to provide quality care and client satisfaction by adopting a system of decentralized participatory planning at the grass root level.

    Under immunization, the present level of coverage (full immunization) is more than 85% and another 8 to 10% are partially covered. The State of Goa with its high standard of health care proposes to accomplish universal immunization, i.e. near 100% coverage of pregnant women and infants and prevent all vaccine preventable>

    Malaria Control Programme : The steep rise in the incidence of malaria, particularly in some of the major towns and its adjoining areas which was found from 1996 onwards started showing a downward trend from 1999 due to concerted intervention measures implemented by the DHS. During the year 2000, there were as many as 9164 cases of malaria and 11 reported deaths due to malaria.

    Filaria : In Goa, filarial infection rate has been maintained at less than 1% for several years. Further, filarial vector infection and infectivity rates are nil for the last five years. During 2000-2001 (upto February, 2001), one new carrier was detected and treated. As a part of night blood survey, 11097 blood smears were examined.

    TB Control Programme : Under TB Control Programme, in order to reduce the incidence of the disease detection, treatment and BCG vaccinations were undertaken during the year.

    Leprosy Eradication Programme : Goa is a low endemic area for leprosy. With the formation of District Leprosy Society and the various activities undertaken under the Comprehensive Leprosy Care Project with the assistance of Non-Government Organisations, etc., it is proposed to eradicate leprosy in Goa by the turn of the Century.

    AIDS Control : The number of HIV cases detected in Goa increased from 3 in 1987 to 807 in 2000. Heterosexual mode of transmission is the predominant mode of transmission in Goa and the majority of the cases were located in Mormugao Taluka wherein the only identified red light area is located. For the speedy and effective implementation of the various activities under AIDS Control Programme, an AIDS Society has been formed.

    Control of Blindness : Under the programme for control of blindness, 14 PHCs have Ophthalmic Assistants to check the eye sight and prescribe spectacles and refer other cases of cataract, etc. to the District Hospitals/GMC. Specialized eye care facilities are provided at the District Hospitals and GMC. During 2000-2001 (upto February, 2001), 35363 patients were examined, 4588 cataract operations were performed (against the target of 6750).

    Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) Control Programme : There are, in all, 4 STD Clinics, three under DHS and one under GMC. During the year 2000, 1359 new cases and 1924 old cases were treated. In all, 4204 VDRL Serological tests were carried out.

    Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control Programme : Keeping in view the National Policy of Universal Iodisation of salt, sale of non-iodised salt for edible purposes is being banned in the State of Goa with effect from 15-8-1997.

    Institute of Nursing Education : General Nursing and Midwife Courses of 3 years duration which prepares first levels nurses to provide health care in hospitals and community are conducted at the Institute.

    Indian System of Medicine : In order to propularise the Indian System of Medicine in Goa, one Ayurveda and two Homeopathic Dispensaries are functioning under the Directorate of Health Services. About 10369 patients were treated during 2000-2001 (upto January, 2001).

    Environmental and Pollution Control Wing : The E PC Laboratory of the DHS is providing all analytical facilities to the industries, Government agencies and institutions and public in analyzing the samples of industrial sewage, water, etc. During 2000-2001, 1394 water samples and 48 river water samples were analysed.

    Mediclaim : A unique scheme of “mediclaim” was introduced in Goa since 1989 under which financial assistance to the extent of Rs.1.25 lakhs per illness is given to the residents of Goa whose annual income is less than Rs.50,000/- for availing super specialities which are not available in the State Government Hospitals. Sone of the Hospitals in the State of Goa and outside State of Goa were recognized for availing the super specialities under the scheme. During the year 2000-2001, 483 (including relaxation cases) patients availed this facility and an amount of Rs.3.05 crores was spent during the year.

    School Health Programme : In order to detect early defects/deficiencies in school going children about 56373 school children were examined during 2000-2001 (up to February, 2001).

    8.11 EMPLOYEES STATE INSURANCE CORPORATION

    8.11.1 Main Functions : To provide following benefits to the employees of the covered factories in case of sickness, maternity and employment injury under the ESI Act:

    • Sickness benefit
    • Maternity benefit
    • Extended Sickness benefit
    • Temporary Disablement benefit
    • Permanent Disablement benefit
    • Dependent benefit.

    All the above benefits are cash benefits, which are provided by the Corporation through three local offices situated at:

    • Local Office Panaji, Panchdeep Bhavan, EDC-23, Ground Floor, Patto, Panaji.
    • Local Office Margao, ESI Hospital Complex, Nr. Rajendra Prasad Stadium, Margao.
    • Local Office Vasco, Plasiano Appts., Opp. Govt. High School, Baina, Vasco.

    Medicare is provided to the employees and their familities through ESI Scheme, which is run by Government of Goa. Labour Commissioner is the head of the Department.

    8.11.2 Contribution to State Income : Nil.

    8.11.3 Employment of ESI Corporation : Sanctioned Strength .. 84

    In Position ……… 48

    8.11.4 Area Covered : Tiswadi, Bardez, Ponda, Salcete, Quepem, Bicholim, Marmugao.

    8.11.5 Accident Reports Received from Covered Employers from 4/2000 to 3/2001:

    564 (Fatal : 10 and Non-fatal : 554).

    8.11.6 Occupational Disease Covered under the ESI Act, 1948 reported to ESI Corporation:

    Sr. No.Occupational DiseaseNo. of CasesNature of Industry% Loss in earning capacity
     NilNilNilNil
    8.12 DIRECTORATE OF PLANNING, STATISTICS AND EVALUATION

    8.12.1 Functions of the Department : This Directorate has three important Divisions, namely, Planning, Statistics and Evaluation. The Planning Division is responsible for formulating Plans and assisting the State Planning Board and the sub-committees appointed thereunder. The objectives of the Statistics Division is to collect compile and disseminate data required for planning and decision making. The Evaluation Division is concerned with both Evaluation of ongoing as well as post facto evaluation of various programmes/projects undertaken by the Government. In addition to the evaluation, regular monitoring of plan programmes/schemes is also being carried out by this Division.

    This Directorate also functions as the office of the Chief Registrar of Births and Deaths for effective implementation of Registration of Births and Deaths Act, 1969.

    It is well accepted that timely and reliable statistics are a basic pre-requisite for effective planning, implementation and monitoring of developmental programmes. The Statistical System in Goa has made rapid strides during successive plans implemented so far.

    As a part of modernization of Directorate of Planning, Statistics and Evaluation, Computerisation Programme of working of the Directorate was initiated. Officers and subordinate staff members were deputed for training in the use of computers. Presently, the work of Planning, State Income, Analysis of Data on Public Finance and various other large scale surveys has been computerized.

    The Directorate participated in the National Programme of Economic Census, Agricultural Census, Livestock Census, minor Irrigation Census, NSS, etc. and completed them successfully.

    8.12.2 Contribution to State Income : State Income Estimates are prepared by this Directorate.

    8.12.3 Employment : The total employment of this Directorate was 161.

    8.12.4 Area Covered : Head Quarter, Panaji.

    8.12.5 Accidents Occurred : Nil.

    8.13 MORMUGAO PORT TRUST

    8.13.1 Structure and Functioning of the Department

    Administrative Set-up : The management and administration of the Mormugao Port Trust are carried out by the Chairman for and on behalf of the Board of Trustees constituted under the provisions of the Major Port Trusts Act, 1963. The Chairman is assisted by Deputy Chairman and Heads of Department.

    For administrative convenience, working of the Port is divided broadly among the following departments. Each “Head of Department” who is appointed by the Ministry of Shipping, functions within the powers delegated to him under the provisions of the Major Port Trusts Act, 1963.

    General Administration Department : The General Administration Department functions as a Secretariat of the Port Trust and its other functions and responsibilities, inter-alia include personnel matters, labour issues, management of legal matters, security affairs, public relations, watch and ward, estate, inter departmental co-ordination and assistance to the Chairman/Deputy Chairman in day-to-day matters regarding information, direction and policy.

    Traffic Department : Traffic Department is headed by the Traffic Manager. This Department is responsible for all operations connected with landing, receipt, storage, delivery and shipment of goods and documentation relating thereto, embarkation and disembarkation of passengers, control of traffic in Port Area, and terminal railway operations.

    Civil Engineering Department : Civil Engineering Department is headed by the Chief Engineer. This Department is responsible for all the Civil Engineering works being executed by the Port Trust. The duties of this department inter-alia comprise construction, maintenance and repairs of the quays/jetties, sheds, buildings, roads, railways, water supply drainage repairs, capital dredging and development of land acquired by the Port.

    Finance Department : The Finance Department is headed by the Financial Advisor and Chief Accounts Officer. This Department is responsible for the preparation of budget estimates, investment of surplus funds, maintenance of accounts of income/expenditure, proposals involving finance, checking estimates for work, etc. Besides, the department arranges the internal audit of the various departments and carries out periodical verification of stores and inventories.

    Medical Department : The Medical Department is headed by the Chief Medical Officer. This Department looks after the Medical Services of the Port Trust.

    Mechanical Engineering Department : The Mechanical Engineering Department is headed by the Chief Mechanical Engineer. This Department looks after the operation and maintenance of Mechanical Ore Handling Plant, other cargo handling equipment and all other mechanical/electrical works of the port. This department is also responsible for acquisition, installation and maintenance of the Port crafts, locomotives, wagons, other items of machinery and automobiles. A fully equipped Mechanical/Electrical Workshop is maintained by this Department to cater to all the maintenance work.

    Marine Department : The Marine Department is headed by the Deputy Conservator. This department is in-charge of all the navigation and marine conservancy services which include pilotage, berthing/unberthing of vessels, marine surveys, salvaging operations, receiver of wreck, etc. The various crafts like mooring barge, tugs, survey/pilot launches, etc. are also manned and operated under this department. This department also carries out the maintenance dredging and is in-charge of the fire fighting and pollution control services and also communication services between ships and the Port.

    Planning and Management Services Department : This Department is headed by the Director. It is in-charge of the corporate planning, economic evaluation of future projects and plans, preparation of feasibility reports, and collection, compilation, analysis and maintenance of comprehensive data on traffic, shipping and utilization of port equipment and crafts, submission of management information, dissemination of information to Ministry and other agencies, traffic forecast, market surveys and trade promotion, Port’s hinterland studies, inhouse training and human resources development, centralized record keeping system, library, information and publicity services.

    Materials Management Department: Headed by the Materials Manager, this Department is in-charge of procurement, stocking and inventory control of all the stores, materials, consumables required for Port Operations and maintenance including acquisition of spares for the Port’s Mechanical Ore Handling Plant and floating crafts like, tugs, dredgers, launches, etc.

    Cargo Handling Labour Department : This Department is headed by the Chief Manager. The function of the Department is to ensure greater regularity of employment to dock workers and to ensure that an adequate number of dock workers is available for the efficient performance of dock work.

    8.13.2 Contribution to State Income :

    (Rs in Crores)

    Sr. No.Description2000-01
    1Operation Income161.93
    2Operating Expenditure141.63
    3Operating Surplus20.30
    4Total Income214.74
    5Total Expenditure192.54
    6Net Surplus22.20

    8.13.3 Employment as on 31-3-2001:

    IIIIIIIVTotal
    16490227919324465

    8.13.4 Area Covered : The total land under Mormugao Port Trust admeasures 443.93 acres. This consists of reclaimed area of 99 acres and an area of 344.93 acres wharf level at Headland Hill and slopes.

    8.13.5 Accidents Occurred During 2000-01 :

    Sr. No.CausationFatalNon-Fatal
    Port AreaNon-Port AreaPort AreaNon-Port Area
    1Striking against object----6--
    2Falling of object----3--
    3Person falling----5--
    4Others----2--
    T o t a l----16--
    8.14 TRAINING

    8.14.1 INSTITUTE OF SAFETY, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT

    The Inspectorate has set up an institute of Safety, Occupational Health and Environment through which it conducts various industry need based training courses on safety, pollution control, occupational health and industrial hygiene, etc.

    Courses Conducted

    Non-academic courses

    ONE DAY PROGRAMME

    • Emergency preparedness
    • Legislation on safety, health and environment
    • Safety Management
    • Total Loss Control
    • Occupational Health Hygiene
    • Emergency Medical Management
    • Making enterprise efficient
    • Fire prevention and control
    • Selection, use and care of PPE
    • Noise hazards and their control
    • Work permit system
    • Material handling
    • Electrical hazards and their control
    • Welding hazards and their control
    • Grinding hazards and their control
    • Wood working hazards and their control
    • Refresher on Safe transportation of hazardous goods by road
    • Computer safety
    • Dock Safety
    • Construction safety
    • Mining safety
    • Telecommunication safety
    • Environment protection

    TWO DAY PROGRAMME

    • Safe handling of chemicals
    • Management of hazardous waste
    • Emergency preparedness

    THREE DAY PROGRAMME

    • Safety Management
    • Total loss control
    • Risk Management
    • Safe transportation of hazardous goods by road

    FIVE DAY PROGRAMME

    • Industrial Hygiene
    • Industrial Safety
    • Basic First Aid

    ONE MONTH

    Boiler attendant course

    8.15 NON-GOVERNMENT ORGANISATION (NGO)

    8.15.1 GREEN TRIANGLE SOCIETY: Green Triangle Society was formed in October, 2000 with the aim of promoting Safety, Health and Environment awareness in public, in general, and industries, in particular.

    Aims and Objectives of the Society : The Society shall be an independent, non-commercial, non-profit making, non-political and autonomous society and the aim shall be:

    • To device, advocate, encourage and promote methods, procedures, research and public support leading to better safety, health and environment.
    • b) To organize and conduct programmes, lectures, conferences and other activities for promoting open discussions on all matters and issues relating to Safety, Health and Environment.
    • c) To conduct educational campaigns with a view to arouse and maintain public opinion and interest of the employers, workers and all other persons to adopt, institute and support measures towards safety, health and environment.
    • d) To collect, co-relate, publish, distribute and disseminate educational and information data, reports and all other materials relating to methods and procedures on safety, health and environment and to serve as a forum for voluntary exchange of such information, experience and ideas.
    • e) To conduct training programmes for awareness and preparedness for chemical emergencies at local level.
    • f) To celebrate National Safety Day, Occupational Health Day and Environment Day.
    • g) To examine and suggest improvements in the Central and State legislations relating to Safety, Health and Environment.
    • h) To organize contests and to establish fellowships and scholarship for educational purposes and to award prizes for suggestions and essay leading to further interest in Safety, Health and Environment.
    • i) To establish a library and to print and publish any newspapers, periodicals, books, leaflets and films as may be deemed desirable for the promotion of the aims and objects of the society.
    • j) To undertake advertising in the press or to adopt such other audio visual means for making known the aims and objects of the society.

    However, there are other NGO’s such as Goa Foundation, Occupational Safety and Health Council, Indian Association of Occupational Health (Goa Chapter), etc. the objective of which are more or less similar to that of the Green Triangle Society and therefore they have not been delved into considering the scope and battery limits of this project.

Resources available and needed

RESOURCES AVAILABLE AND NEEDED

FOR MANAGEMENT OF OSH

During the study, the team visited departments and organizations dealing with occupational safety and health the manufacturing sector with a view to establish inventory of occupational safety and health information in the State of Goa. The activities of these departments and resources available at their disposal were examined to determine the problems faced by the organizations in the matters of occupational safety and health and further resources needed in order to effectively manage occupational safety and health at the state level.

The scope of the study was limited to cover the organizations connected with safety and health at the state level. Occupational safety and health management at the unit level in the factories covered under the Factories Act was limited only to the information available in the annual returns and accident forms. Detailed analysis in the areas related to functioning of Safety Committees, availability of safety reports, crèches, etc. as per the provisions of the Factories Act in each of the units was not undertaken as it was outside the defined scope of this study. In order to identify these problems, more elaborate in-depth study is required to be taken up to get a comprehensive information on management of occupational safety and health at unit level.

The findings and recommendations, as brought out by the study, are summarized below:

RECOMMENDATIONS

1) In the State of Goa, there were 598 factories registered under Section 2(m) of the Factories Act, 1948 as on 31st December, 2000. However, factories notified under Section 85 were nil which essentially employ less than 10 workers in factories working with power and less than 20 workers working without the aid of power. However, only 502 factories submitted annual returns for the year 2000. This accounts 79% of the registered factories. As the annual returns contain basic information such as employment, man-hour employed, accidents, man-hours lost due to accidents, provision of welfare facilities, appointment of welfare officers and safety officers, occupational health facilities, etc. which are essential for compilation of State level data on occupational safety and health, it is desirable that submission of annual returns should be insisted upon from all the factories. It is recommended that efforts should be made to ensure compliance with the requirement of submission of annual returns in prescribed format by all registered factories. It is also recommended that the occupier/manager of the factories should be insisted to submit complete details in the annual returns. Non-compliance with such provisions can be brought to the notice of the occupier by issuing notice by the inspecting officials.

2) Therefore, it is recommended that the annual return form prescribed under the Goa Factories Rules may be amended to include following additional information:

(i) The description of the factory as per NIC >

(ii) NIC Code.

(iii) Whether covered under Section 2(cb)

(iv) Whether notified as factory carrying on dangerous operations under Section 87.

(v) Whether covered under MSIHC Rules as MAH Installations.

3) During the year 2000, there were 6 fatal accidents, out of which 4 occurred in Basic Metals and Alloys manufacturing units, contributing to more than 60% of the total fatal accidents in the State.

Therefore during the inspection of factories, due consideration may be given to basic safety aspects by the Factory Inspectors. The Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers may prepare a programme for improving safety while working with basic metals and alloys in the industries. The guidelines issued by the DGFASLI under Section 7A and Section 41-C with regard to process safety should be circulated and given wide publicity amongst such units.

4) About 25% of non-fatal accidents have occurred to the workers in Basic Metals and Alloys products manufacturing industries followed by 20% in Transport Equipment and Parts Industries. More than 60% of the non-fatal accidents occurred to the workers in the age group of 18 – 36 years. This may be due to under-confidence amongst the new and less experienced workers in the factories. About 35% of the non-fatal accidents occurred to the workers in the age group of 36 – 50 years. This may be due to over-confidence amongst the more experienced workers. Another reason for above could be the change of job of these workers without proper training/ retraining in the safety and health related aspect pertaining to their jobs.

It is recommended that the need for training and retraining of workers in safety and health aspects at regular intervals, and also when there is a change in their job should be brought to the notice of the occupiers or managers. Further, the occupiers can also be directed to introduce a suggestion scheme/incentive scheme and other motivational tools for promoting safety and health at work place.

5) Almost 37% of non-fatal accidents were caused due to stepping, striking and struck against and about 21% are due to caught in between objects. This indicates that good housekeeping, proper work procedure, safe system of work, safe operating procedures, etc. are not being followed in the factories.

It is recommended that the occupiers or the managers of the factories should be intimated about their statutory duties for designing and implementing, maintaining good housekeeping, suitable>

6) Material handling, tools, implements, appliances used on the shop floor, machines and indoors are the major agencies causing accidents.

It is, therefore, suggested that the occupiers/managers of the factories should be advised on:

(i) design, maintenance and proper use of material handling equipment

(ii) safe use of tools, appliances and equipment

(iii) adequate guarding of machinery, and

(iv) plant layout and housekeeping

7) The analysis of accidents with respect to the location of injuries reveal that almost 65% of the bodily injury has occurred to Upper Limb Portion and 18% to Lower Limb Portion, followed by 7% each at Multiple and Unspecified locations. The head, hands and foot are the body parts which are frequently injured in accidents. This indicates that proper protection of these body parts is not ensured at workplace. Therefore the occupiers should be advised to give appropriate personal protective equipment to their workers and make sure that they are used by workers while working in factories.

8) Statistics on the frequency rate, severity rate and incident rate of accident in the State of Goa reveal that Basic Metals and Alloys, Cotton Textile and Metal Products and Parts industry has the highest severity rate of accident followed by manufacture of non-metal products and next by Transport and Equipment Parts followed by manufacture of Rubber, Plastic and Coal production. Repair of capital goods, wholesale trade, electric and electronic equipment industries also have a very high potential for causing severe accidents.

However, it is appreciated that the incidence rate of accidents in the state is 4.49 as compared to 11 per thousand worker at National level.

It is recommended that industries having potential for severe accidents should be notified under Section 87 of the Factories Act. Emphasis should be given on compliance with the provisions of the Factories Act in these factories.

9) No case of occupational disease was reported to ESIC hospitals in the year 2000 for compensation. Not a single case was reported to the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers in the prescribed format as required under Section 89 of the Factories Act.

10) As regards preparation of safety policy and constitution of safety committees, the level of compliance with these provisions is very low. The statistics have revealed that only about 7% of the factories have prepared Safety Policy under statutory requirement. However, the number of factories/units required to constitute Safety Committees is not readily available. As per the information available, 210 units have so far constituted Safety Committees in the State.

 

It is recommended that on the basis of the provisions of the Factories Act and the criteria laid down in Factories Rules, all units requiring preparation of safety policy and constitution of safety committee should be clearly identified. Thereafter, the compliance with these provisions should be strengthened through strict enforcement and inspection.

11) There is a satisfactory level of compliance as far as the appointment of safety officer in factories is concerned. There were 4 units which required to appoint Safety Officers, whereas 10 Units have already appointed Safety Officers. In the reports of accidents in Form 30 under Rule 131(3) of Goa Factory Rules, 1985 amended (1990), details of the accidents, causes of accidents and agencies involved therein, non-use of personal protective equipment, etc., were not reflected adequately. It shows that due care has not been taken while filling the accident forms.

It is, therefore, recommended that Form 30 under Rule 131(3) of Goa Factories Rules should be filled with due care entering all the relevant information. Further, training and retraining of the Safety Officers on the following topics may be conducted in factories. Factory Inspectorate may advise the factories in this regard.

(i) Accident Reporting, Investigation and Analysis

(ii) New Techniques of Safety Management System

(iii) Technique of Safety Audit

(iv) Techniques of HAZOP Studies

(v) Techniques of Risk Analysis

(vi) Cost Management of Accidents

(vii) Leadership for Safety and Health.

This may lead to better status of safety and health management in factories. It is also recommended that there should be better interaction between Factory Inspectors and Safety Officers through discussions on the ways and means for improving the safety, health and working conditions in the factories.

12) As per the requirement under Rule 90(0) of Goa Factories Rules, 1985, amended (1990), only 2 factories submitting returns, have established Ambulance Rooms. However, no information is available regarding the number of factories for establishment of occupational health centers.

Therefore, it is suggested that on the basis of the recommendation at Serial No.2, the factories requiring (a) ambulance room (b) occupational health centers and (c) appointment of factory medical officer on retainership/part-time/full time basis may be identified. Thereafter, efforts should be made by prevailing upon the management of such factories to establish occupational health centre as per the provisions of the Factories Act and the Rules.

13) The provisions under the Factories Act and Rules provides for medical examination of workers employed in certain categories of factories by certifying surgeon. As there are about 356 factories requiring medical examination of workers employed therein, it is practically impossible to cover these factories by one Medical Inspector of Factories employed in the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers.

Therefore, it is suggested that on the lines of what is being done in other states, such as, Maharashtra Private Medical Practitioner could be appointed as certifying surgeon for particular areas, in order to conduct medical examination of workers and issue certificate of fitness as required under the Factories Act and the Rules.

14) The total no.of inspections carried out during the year 2000 were 95. However, it is felt that the inspections should be carried out in a manner such that the factory involving hazardous processes, dangerous operations, etc. are given priority. It is also recommended that MAH cell be created.

Statistics regarding inspection of the factories carried out during the year 2000 revealed that all the factories notified under Section 2(m) of the Factories Act have been inspected. On the whole, on an average 146 factories were inspected per inspector covering almost all the registered factories in state.

As against suggested norm of 150 factories per inspector this figure is adequate and leaves no scope for compromise on quality of inspection. However, efforts may be made for further improvement in this area. This can be achieved through:

(i) prioritization of inspection with emphasis on MAH units

(ii) strengthening of Inspectorate and facilities with formation of a cell for MAH units.

The small scale units engaged in processing of cashew nuts, saw mills, fish processing, canning and preserving, cotton textile handloom units are employing less than 10/20 workers. Emphasis on inspection of such factories could be reduced and more emphasis could be given on inspection of the factories engaged in manufacturing of chemicals, cotton textile mills, manufacture of paper, food products, etc. which are more hazardous in nature and employing more number of workers. This would require an in-depth study of the pattern of industry vis-à-vis, the quantum and quality of hazard, level of employment, etc. Thereafter action plan for prioritization of inspection should be worked out. Separate checklist for inspection of small, notified factories should be prepared, keeping in view the general level of compliance expected in respect of these factories.

15) A number of factories in the state are employing labour on contract basis for undertaking various activities. As per the definition of “worker”, under Section 2(l) of the Factories Act, 1948, even the contract worker is to be provided adequate safety and health in the factory premises. It is often observed that the occupier/manager of the factory tend to ignore this responsibility. The Contract Labour Act is enforced by the office of the Labour Commissioner in the State. In order to ensure that adequate attention is given to the safety, health and welfare of the contract labour by the occupier, a programme for enforcement of safety and health provisions for the benefit of contract labour employed in the factory can be jointly undertaken by the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers and Office of the Labour Commissioner. This programme can also include awareness improvement and training and education in the area of safety and health.

16) Department of Science, Technology and Environment, among other things is responsible for clearing industrial projects from environmental angle. There is a Site Appraisal Committee under the chair of Inspector of Factories and Boilers, constituted under Section 41-A of the Factories Act. These two committees are having similar objectives, i.e. clearing the location of industry from safety, health and environment angle. It is, therefore, suggested that these two committees should work in close coordination with each other in order to avoid duplication of efforts to facilitate faster clearance of industrial projects and to reduce the inconvenience to the industries and promote economic growth. In fact, as per the recommendation of the High Level Committee, constituted by Ministry of Labour to study the overlapping provisions, the Site Appraisal Committee, constituted under the Factories Act should be empowered to give environment clearance to the initial location of industrial projects likely to be covered under the Factories Act.

17) There are more than 6000 small scale industrial units and 138 large and medium industries in State. These units are registered with the Department of Industries and Mines. The Department looks after the licensing, development, training, marketing and financial aspects in respect of these units. However, the safety, health and welfare of workers are not adequately covered by this Department. For educating the owner-managers as well as the workers of small scale units in the field of safety, health and productivity, a collaborative programme can be devised and implemented by the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers and the Department of Industries and Mines. For this purpose, the training module developed by the Central Labour Institute, in collaboration with ILO, could be used. If required, Central Labour Institute, Mumbai can also be associated extensively in these efforts.

18) As stated in Recommendation at Serial No. 2, more number of fatal accidents are caused at Basic Metals and Alloys manufacturing. This indicates the inadequacy of attention paid to safety while working with metals and alloys. This could be because of low level of awareness, lack of education and training, employment of non-qualified persons for the works connected with chemical processing, etc.

Since these aspects are coming under the scope of activities of the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers, it is suggested that a programme could be formulated in collaboration with Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers and Central Labour Institute, Mumbai to improve the status of safety in Basic Metals and Alloys manufacturing units. In this programme specific chemical hazards while working in the factories could be identified and the precautions to be taken could be disseminated through various modes such as training programmes, leaflets, booklets, lectures, etc. the Factory Inspector should also be trained in this area to identify the non-compliance with the provisions and issue necessary directives/guidelines to the occupiers/ managers.

19) The Department of Health Services in the State has 2 District General Hospitals, 19 Primary Health Centres, 5 Community Health Centres and 172 Sub-Centres with 27 Rural Medical Dispensaries. The medical practitioners appointed in these hospitals are mainly concentrating on diagnosis, prevention, control and treatment of the common diseases such as leprosy, tuberculosis, malaria, filarial, AIDS, etc.

It is suggested that all medical practitioners in these hospitals should also be exposed/trained in occupational health. Their extensive training in the field of occupational health will improve their skills in early detection or diagnosis of occupational diseases and will help them in recommending suitable>

20) Employees Insurance Medical Services Department in the State provides the medical services to the workers covered under the ESIC Act, 1948. The workers are referred to the hospitals for diagnosis and treatment. However, it was found that the suspected as well as confirmed cases of occupational diseases are not brought to the notice of the Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers. As a result, no case of occupational disease is reported under Section 89 of the Factories Act.

It is suggested that a programme for close coordination between ESIC, ESI Hospitals (The Insurance Medical Services Department) and Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers should be prepared for early detection, diagnosis and prevention of occupational diseases. This will facilitate taking appropriate preventive measures by the inspectors of factories in order to eliminate or control the causative working conditions in various factories. This will improve the status of occupational health of the working >

21) The programme on control of fire incidents could be prepared in collaboration with Fire Brigade Department, Industries Association and Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers. This programme should include, formulation of mutual aid scheme and establishment of emergency response centres in various industrial pockets of the states.

22) In addition to what is being done by the non-governmental organization such as Green Triangle Society, various employers association in the state should also take up the activities in the field of safety and health on a large scale. This should include organizing seminars and workshops, debates for senior executives from the industries and trade union leaders, etc. In these seminars and workshops the issues arising out of liberalization, globalization, modern manufacturing techniques and developments, new innovations in the field of manufacturing, etc. vis-à-vis their impact on safety, health and welfare of the workers should be discussed.

23) In order to promote safety, health and welfare of workers employed in factories, seminars and workshops should also be organized for increasing the awareness level of union leaders in the field. The unit level union leaders should be involved in training and education of workers in the field of safety and health. In such programmes, more emphasis should be given on the role of union leaders in promotion of safety and health at the workplace. The trade union leaders may be sponsored by the units to attend safety and health training programmes conducted by reputed organizations, like the Central Labour Institute, Mumbai. The Institute of Safety, Health and Environment, Goa may also arrange such programmes for trade union leaders.

24) The facilities available with the Institute of Safety, Occupational Health and Environment should be used to assess the occupational health status of the workers employed in small scale units, particularly, those employed in cashew processing units. Based on the outcome, suitable>

25) While collecting the statistics regarding the factories as well as accidents, it was found by the study team that although the factories were submitting the annual returns in the prescribed format to the Inspectorate in time, but due to shortage of manpower and facilities, the collected information could not be processed and the trends regarding various parameters on occupational safety and health could not be established.

It is, therefore, suggested that all field level officers should be equipped with suitable> This will improve the communication with other Labour Departments/Offices and DGFASLI.

26) In order to review the status of safety, health and welfare in the factories and formulate action plan on the basis of findings, time to time, a tripartite state level committee on Occupational Safety and Health should be constituted under the Chairmanship of the Labour Minister. In this committee, representatives of Government Departments connected with factories and labour, representatives of employers’ and employees’ can be included. This is also in line with the recommendations made by the Standing Labour Committee to the Indian Labour Conference.

References

REFERENCES

  • Annual Returns – 2000 : Inspectorate of Factories & Boilers, Panaji, Goa.
  • Report – 2000 : Office of the Commissioner of Labour & Employment, Panaji, Goa.
  • Annual Report – 2001 : Directorate of Industries and Mines, Panaji, Goa.
  • Report – 2000 : Directorate of Fisheries, Panaji, Goa.
  • Report – 2000 : Office of the Captain of Ports, Panaji, Goa.
  • Report – 2003 : Green Triangle Society, Panaji, Goa.
  • Annual Report 2000-2001 : Goa State Pollution Control Board, Panaji, Goa.
  • Goa Tourism Directory and Information Booklets – 2003 : Directorate of Tourism, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report -2003 : Directorate of Health Services, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report – 2003 : Directorate of Fire Services, Panaji, Goa.
  • Statistical Hand Book of Goa – 1998-99, Goa Economy Figures 2001, 2002 : Directorate of Planning, Statistics and Evaluation.
  • Citizens Charter-2001 : Deptt. of Science, Technology and Environment.
  • A Portrait of Population and SRS Bulletin-2002 : Directorate of Census Operations, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report-2003 : Directorate of Khadi & Village Industries, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report-2003 : Directorate of Agriculture, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report – 2003 : Directorate of Transport, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report-2003 : Directorate of E.S.I. Corporation, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Report – 2003 : Central Electrical Authority, Regional Inspectorial Organisation, Panaji, Goa.
  • Information Booklet-2003 : Institute of Safety, Occupational Health and Environment, Altinho, Panaji, Goa.
  • Citizens Charter-2000 : Directorate of Industries & Mines, Govt. of Goa, Panaji.
  • The Factories Act, 1948 and Goa State Rules.
  • ILO Code of Practice for Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases.
  • Indian Standards IS 3786 on Method for Computation of Frequency and Severity Rates for Industrial Injuries and Classification of Industrial Accidents.

annexures

ANNEXURE - I

THE FACTORIES ACT, 1948 ( AMENDED 1987 ), 1948
THE THIRD SCHEDULE
(See section 89 and 90)

List of notifiable diseases

  • Lead poisoning including poisoning by any preparation or compound of lead or their sequelae.
  • Lead tetra-ethyl poisoning.
  • Phosphorous poisoning or its sequelae.
  • Mercury poisoning or its sequelae.
  • Manganese poisoning or its sequelae.
  • Arsenic poisoning or its sequelae.
  • Poisoning by nitrous fumes.
  • Carbon bisulphide poisoning.
  • Benzene poisoning, including poisoning by any of its homologues, their nitro or amido derivatives or its sequelae.
  • Chrome ulceration or its sequelae.
  • Anthrax.
  • Silicosis.
  • Poisoning by halogens or halogen derivatives of the hydrocarbons, of the aliphatic series.
  • Pathological manifestation due to : -
    • radium or other radioactive substances.
    • X-rays.
  • Primary epitheliomatous cancer of the skin.
  • Toxic anaemia.
  • Toxic jaundice due to poisonous substances.
  • Oil acne or dermatitis due to mineral oils and compounds containing mineral oil base.
  • Byssionosis.
  • Asbestosis.
  • Occupational or contact dermatitis caused by direct contract with chemical and paints. These are of types, that is, primary irritants and allergic sensitizers.
  • Noise induced hearing loss (exposure to high noise levels).
  • Beryllium poisoning.
  • Carbon monoxide.
  • Coal miners' pneumoconiosis.
  • Phosgene poisoning.
  • Occupational cancer.
  • Isocyanides poisoning.
  • Toxic nephritis.

ANNEXURE - II

EMPLOYEES STATE INSURANCE ACT, 1948
THE THIRD SCHEDULE
LIST OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES

PART A

Sl.No.Occupational diseaseEmployment
1.Infectious and parastic diseases contracted in an occupation where there is a particular risk of contamination.
  • All work involving exposure to health or laboratory work;
  • All work involving exposure to veterinary work;
  • Work relating to handling animals, animals carcasses, part of such carcasses, or merchandise which may have been contaminated by animals or animal carcasses;
  • Other work carrying a particular risk of contamination.
2.Diseases caused by work in compressed air.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned.
3.Diseases caused by lead or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
4.Poisoning by nitrous fumes.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
5.Poisoning by organphosphorus compoundAll work involving exposure to the risk concerned

PART B

Sl.No.Occupational diseaseEmployment
1.Diseases caused by phosphorus or toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
2.Diseases caused by mercury or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
3.Diseases caused by benzene or its toxic homologues.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
4.Diseases caused by nitro and amino derivatives of benzene or its homologues.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
5.Diseases caused by chromium or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
6.Diseases caused by arsenic or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
7.Diseases caused by radioactive substances and ionising radiations.All work involving exposure to the reaction of radioactive substances or ionising radiations.
8.Primary epithelomatous cancer of the skin caused by tar, pitch bitumen, mineral oil, anthracene or the compounds, products or residues of these substancesAll work involving exposure to the risk concerned
9.Diseases caused toxic halogen derivatives by hydrocarbons (of the aliphatic and aromatic series).All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
10.Diseases caused by carbon disulphide.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
11.Occupational cataract due to infra-red radiations.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
12.Diseases caused by manganese or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
13.Skin diseases caused by physical, chemical or biological agents not include in other items.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
14.Hearing impairment caused by noise.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
15.Poisoning by dinitrophenol or a homologue or by substituted dinitrophenol or by the salts of such substances.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
16.Diseases caused by beryllium or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
17.Diseases caused by cadmium or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
18.Occupational asthma caused by recognised sensitising agents inherent to the work process.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
19.Diseases caused by fluorine or its toxic compounds.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
20.Diseases caused by nitroglycerine or other nitroacid esters.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
21.Diseases caused by alcohols and ketones.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
22.Diseases caused by asphyxiants; carbon monoxide, and its toxic derivatives, hydrogen sulphide.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
23.Lung cancer and mesotheliomas caused by asbestos.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
24.Primary neoplasm of the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder or the kidneys or the ureter.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned

PART C

Sl.No.Occupational diseaseEmployment
1.Pneumoconiosis caused by sclerogenic mineral dust (silicosis, anthraoosilicosis asbestosis) and silico-tuberculosis provided that silicosis is an essential factor in causing the resultant incapacity or death.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
2.BagassosisAll work involving exposure to the risk concerned
3.Bronchopulmonary diseases caused by cotton, flax hemp and sisal dust (Byssinosis)All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
4.Extrinsic allergic alvoelities caused by the inhalation of organic dusts.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned
5.Bronchopulmonary diseases caused by hard metals.All work involving exposure to the risk concerned

ORGANISATION CHART OF INSPECTORATE OF FACTORIES & BOILERS, GOA

INSPT. OF FACT.

FACTORIES ACTBOILERS ACTTRAINING<
Head Clerk 1G.I. (Safety) 4Inspt. Of Boilers 1Prog. officer 1Chemist 1
Accountant 1Lab. Insp.(Eng.) 1Craft Inst. (Boiler) 1Trng. Asst. 1Lab.Inspt (Chem) 1
UDC 1S.A. 1UDC 1Curator 1Male Nurse 1
Cashier 1UDC 1LDC 1Asst. Librarian 1Opthalmic Asst. 1
LDC 1LDC 1Boiler Attend. 1Hostel Suptd. 1X-ray Technicia 1
Peon 1Driver (LV) 1Peon 1Artist 1Lab Technician 3
Watchmen 5Peon 1 LDC 1ECG Technicia 1
Sweepers 4  Recp.cum.tel.oper. 1Lab. Assistant 2
    LDC 1
   Driver (HV) 1Driver (HV) 2
   Attendant 2Field Assistant 1
   Hostel Attendant 1Projectionist 1