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Introduction

INTRODUCTION

With the rapid growth of technology and globalization of economic review, transfer of technological knowledge has taken place throughout the world at a very fast rate. Opening up of the Indian economy there is a flow of new technology, products and resources to India. The applications of new technology have often led to benefits such as improved productivity and reduced physical exertion. Conversely the misapplication of such technology has given rise to hazards threatening safety and health. The problems are more complex when the issue of management of occupational safety, health and environment is concerned. For the management of occupational safety and health through various instruments such as policies and programmes, it becomes essential to base these instruments on sound footing.

Both management and organized labour have agreed that safety and health on the job is the management responsibility. The duty of an employer is to protect employees against health hazards in addition to their safety. This necessitates designing of newer policies and programmes in respect of safety, health and environment.

Decision where safety is involved often-present dilemma for planning authorities. Presently information in this area is not up to-date and readily available for the policy makers. In many cases the authorities have to weigh the advantages, which proposed development might bring against disadvantage that more people might be at some risk. The decision is less difficult when this risk is very great or very small, but many cases it falls between these two extremes.

In the emerging scenarios, industries have to effectively deal with multitude of challenge like rapidly involving new technology, shorter life circle, globalization, increased competition and the need to substantially reduce the environmental impact. A national inventory on capabilities and management of occupational safety, health and environment will be of great help for designing and implementing various instruments to protect safety, health and environment of the large workforce working in various sectors of the economy. These requires on line assessment of the present status on occupational safety and health in the country. As such a pilot project has been taken up for the state of Orissa with the objective to collect and compile various information on occupational safety and health and dissemination of information regarding the extent of compilation with the important provisions under the Factories Act, 1948 and the rules framed there under including system of notification of occupational accidents and diseases as per ILO code of practice at the unit level and state level.

1.1. NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FRAMEWORK

At the national level, they provide for the establishment of a national framework for occupational safety and health (OSH) management systems, preferably supported by national laws and regulations. Action at national level includes the nomination of (a) competent institution (s) for OSH-MS, (b) the formulation of a coherent national policy and (c) the establishment of ILO-OSH 2001, either by means of its direct implementation in organizations or its adaptation to national conditions and practice (by national guidelines) and specific needs of organizations in accordance with their size and nature of activities (by tailored guidelines).

The National Policy for OSH-MS should be formulated by competent institution(s) in consultation with employers’ and workers’ organizations, and should consider:

  • Promotion of OSH-MS as a part of overall management
  • Promote voluntary arrangements for systematic OSH improvement
  • Avoid unnecessary bureaucracy, administration and costs
  • Support by labour inspectorate, safety and health and other services

The functions and responsibilities of implementing institutions should be clearly defined as well. Figure 1 of the Guidelines describes the elements of the national framework for OSH managements systems. It shows the different ways in which ILO-OSH 2001 may be implemented in a member State:

Figure 1

orissa

orissa2

ACTIVITIES COVERED

The activities of this project have been divided in the following categories:

  • Background information about the state of Orissa–
    Deal with the demographic and geographic characteristic of the state of Orissa, population in different districts and major occupations of the people.
  • Economic activities
    Deal with the various aspects of economic sectors in the state, their value of production, employment generated and contribution to the GDP.
  • Activities in manufacturing sector
    Deals with the different activities carried out in the manufacturing sector as per the National Industries Code, value of production, employment generation, etc.
  • Occupational injuries and diseases
    Deal with the analysis of the occupational injuries – fatal and non-fatal and cases of occupational diseases in the manufacturing sector.
  • Management of occupational safety and health
    Deal with the infrastructure and resources available at the unit level and the state level for managing the crucial issue of occupational safety and health.
  • Resources available and needed for the management of occupational safety and health.

Based on the analysis of occupational injuries, diseases and the capabilities available in the state of Orissa for the management of occupational safety and health, an attempt is made to assess the resources required for the better management of occupational safety and health.

The information pertaining to various economic sectors was collected by visiting each of the departments, having detailed discussions with the respective heads and referring to the annual returns of these departments. The information related with the manufacturing sector was collected from the annual returns submitted by the factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948. The data related to the occupational injuries and studying the accident forms and recording them on to the data sheets specifically designed for this purpose analyzed diseases.

Background information

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Orissa is a mineral rich state situated in the eastern part of India. It is endowed with vast natural and human resources, which can be used for the industrial development. Mineral deposits like Iron Ore, Chromite, Manganese Ore, Bauxite etc and agricultural surplus like rice, pulses, oil seeds, vegetables, spices offers vast scope for establishing new industries in Orissa. Cheap unskilled labour forces are available in the district as more than 80% of the total population of the state lives in rural areas. But technical and skilled entrepreneurs are rarely available and adequate infrastructure facilities in different areas are not sufficient for establishing new industries. Therefore, despite its vast natural and human resources, Orissa continues to be one of the industrially backward states.

The total area covered by the state is 1,55,782 sq.km. with population of 31,659,736. It is endowed with a long coastal line nearly 485 km. stretched along the Bay of Bengal, interspersed with numerous ports.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

LOCATION

The State of Orissa is located in the eastern coast of India at 17 Degree 49' N - 22 Degree 34' N Latitude 81 Degree 29' E-87 Degree 29' E Longitude. Orissa is surrounded by Andhra Pradesh on the South-East, Madhya Pradesh on the West, Bihar in North, West Bengal in North-East and Bay of Bengal in the East.

AREA

The State has total area of 15,5707 sq. km.

CLIMATE AND CLIMATIC ZONES:

Climate is usually humid or hot moist. Average rainfall: 1482 mm where as, Annual average temperature: 26.2 Degree C.

PHYSIOGRAPHY

Orissa can be divided into two clear-cut natural divisions.

  • The coastal Plain and
  • The North-Western Plateau.

The coastal plain varies in width except in Southern Ganjam District where the Eastern Ghats are the highest (1500 meters above sea level) and lies close to the sea. A very large river, Mahanadi crosses this plain and its big delta merges into the deltas formed by the Brahmini and Baitarani. These deltas are fertile and are provide with irrigation facilities. All these rivers being enormous water and sometimes cause dangerous floods during the rainy season. But during the dry seasons, their channels are almost dry. The largest Salt Lake 'Chilka Lake' is situated in this State only. It is situated at 110 Km from Bhubaneswar, the State capital of Orissa. The coastal low land receives about 152 cm rain a year because it comes directly under the influence of tropical depression originating in the Bay of Bengal during the monsoon and rainy season. Thus a distinctive climate feature is introduced into the climate of this region by tropical cyclone which sometimes causes immense damage to property and the standing crops particularly sugarcane, coconuts both of strong wind and heavy downpour. Mangrove grows along the delta where it meets the sea.

*Updated on October 2000

DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

Demographic Information as per census 1991

GENERAL
Area (in Sq Km)No. of DistrictsNo. of TahasilsNo. of CD BlocksNo. of TownsNo. of Villages
TotalRuralUrban   StatutoryCensusInhabitedUn-inhabited
155,707153,1632,544131473141022246,9894,068

LITERATE POPULATION

 Population (lakh)% of population
 197119811991197119811991
Total57.4590.27129.1680.5338.8349.09
Male42.2862.6984.1944.5053.3463.09
Female15.1827.5944.9716.2923.9934.68
 Population Density (per sq km)
Total203
Rural179
Urban1,665
LITERACY
 No. of Literates (in '000s)Literacy Rate
Persons12,91649.1
Males8,41963.1
Females4,49734.7

WORK PARTICIPATION RATE

Per cent Main Worker engaged in
CultivationAgricultural LabourLivestock, Forestry, etc.
44.328.71.9
48.422.82.1
25.855.10.8
 Per cent Main Worker engaged in
Mining QuarryingManufacturing etc., in Household IndustriesManufacturing etc., in non- Household IndustriesConstructionTrade CommerceTransport, Storage CommunicationOther Services
Persons1.03.13.50.95.41.79.6
Males1.02.73.91.06.12.110.0
Females1.05.21.70.42.30.27.6

RELIGION

Distribution of population by Religion (in percentage)
HindusMuslimsChristiansSikhsBuddhistsJainsOthersNot States
94.671.832.100.050.030.021.260.04

The total population of Orissa as at 0:00 hours of 1st March 2001 stood at 36,706,920 as per the provisional results of the Census of India 2001. In terms of population it holds the same position (eleventh) among States and Union territories as at the previous census.

POPULATION

The population of the state is 30,151,270 according to 1991 census figures. Literacy in the state is 34.12 % of the population.

(Source: Provisional Population Totals : India . Census of India 2001, Paper 1 of 2001)

NATURAL RESOURCES, AGRICULTURE

NATURAL RESOURCES
MINERALS

Orissa is a mineral rich state having deposits of important minerals and ores like : Bauxite, Chinaclay, Chromite , Coal, Copper Ore, Dolomite, Fireclay, Garnet (Granular), Graphite, Illuminate, Iron Ore (Hematite), Limestone, Manganese ore, Pyre Phyllite, Quartzite, Sillimanite and Vanadium Ore. Most of these minerals and ores are being commercially mined.

Mineral Resources of Orissa

Iron Ore : - 4th largest iron ore producing state and production in 2000-2001 was very closed to that of Goa. The most important deposits occur in Sundargarh, Mayurbhanj, Cuttack, Sambalpur, Koraput and Kendujhargarh. Some of the deposits worked by the Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. are the high-grade iron ore bodies in Mayurbhanj district at Gurumahisani, Sulaipat and Badampahar. Barsua is the single largest iron mine in the state, which supplied ores to Rourkela Steel Plant.

Manganese: - It is the largest manganese ore producing state in the country and accounted for 1/3rd of the country’s total production in 2000-2001. Manganese deposits occur in three widely separated areas of Keonjhar-Bonai belt, Koraput-Kalahandi belt and Gangapur area. These deposits are scattered in a triangular area, covering Barbil, Dhubra and Bhutura, to the southeast of the main iron ore range.

Chromites: - Orissa is the largest producer of Chromite in India, both in quantity and quality. In 2000-2001, the state accounted for 99% of the country’s total production of chromite. Sukinda district in Cuttack district is the most important mining area. High-grade deposits are also found in Keonjhar and Dhenkanal districts.

Bauxite : - Orissa has become the largest bauxite producing state in India after the Government owned National Aluminum Company Ltd. (NALCO) started bauxite mining in this state. It has accounted for 36.8% of the country’s total production of bauxite in 2000-2001. Panchpatmali deposits in Koraput district are the most important bauxite deposits in the state. Other deposits occur in Sundargarh, Bolangir and Sambalpur districts.

Lead: - Sargipalli – Dhumohali area of Sundargarh district is the lead ore mining area of the state. In 2000-2001, Orissa accounted for 9.4% of the country’s total production.

Coal : - Talcher and Rampur – Himgir are two most coalfields of the state. Production is dominated by low grade bituminous coal. The state accounts for 14% of the county’s total proven reserve all of which are of non-coking bituminous varieties. Rourkela Steel Plant uses coal from Talcher for power generation and by fertilizer factory at Talcher as raw material.

MINERAL PRODUCTION ('000 tonnes)

1990-911996-97
 QtyRs. Lakh% to State's TotalQty
Coal1621231,71147.837150
Chromite89315,32923.11360
Iron ore83677,15910.811320
Manganese Ore5051,8142.7690
Bauxite19123,3015.02750
Lead Conc.89501.46

Agriculture

Agriculture is the most dominant sector of the State economy and it contributes around 50% of the State income. 75% of the working population of Orissa are in agriculture. Rice is the primary cereal crop. Besides Maize, Ragi (Minor Millet), Jowar (Sorghum) grow extensively. Orissa produces sizable quantities of Groundnut, Sesame, Niger and other Oilseeds. The State also produces fiber crops like Jute, Mesta and Sumhemp that have good export market as jute products such as carpet, backing cloth and hessians for packaging. large quantity of coconut (234 million nuts per year) and Cashew Nut (over 90,000 hectares) are also grown in Orissa.

PATTERN OF LAND UTILIZATION ('000 hectares)1990-911996-97
Area Under Forest Cover
Land under forests54765606
Area Under Cultivation
Land available for crop cultivation6637-
Fallow land618-
Fallow land other than current fallows214343
Current fallows119452
Permanent Pastures726534
Net area sown63045968
Area sown more than once3290-
Gross cropped area9594-
Land put to non-agriculture use746858

AREA, PRODUCTION AND YIELD OF PRINCIPLE CROPS

Crops1996-971997-98
Area(M.Hects)Production(M.Tonnes)Yield (Kgs/Hect)Area(M.Hects)Production(M.Tonnes)Yield (KGs/Hect)
Coarse Cereals0.220.167360.190.14736
Coconut0.052.7251230.052.723123
Gram0.030.026360.040.02629
Maize0.060.0712420.050.061228
Oilseeds0.410.174120.410.21503
Onion0.040.2978770.050.163511
Potato0.010.12120000.010.099000
Pulse (Total)0.660.233430.810.28351
Rice4.474.449934.506.201380
Sugarcane0.021.33665000.021.1457000
Tobacco0.010.015910.010.01625
Tur0.120.075500.160.08510
YIELD RATE OF PRINCIPAL CROPS IN ORISSA (Qty/Hect.)
Crops1990-911995-961996-97 (P)
Rice (Total)11.9813.759.93
Autumn Rice9.399.515.46
Winter Rice12.1814.2210.01
Summer Rice20.1931.8822.67
Ragi6.126.126.02
Gram6.356.686.37
Mung1.712.882
Biri2.163.012.64
Sugar Cane238.26583.90566.41
Mustard2.011.691.47
Jute16.9115.4916.02
Cotton2.062.003.27
Potato94.6496.95115.75

P Provisional

Source - 1. Directorate of Economics Statistics, Orissa, BBSR.
2. Directorate of Agriculture and Food Production, Orissa, BBSR.

INDUSTRY

By March, 1995, the State had 285 large and medium industrial units with investment of Rs. 13.40 billions employing 76,400 persons. In addition, it had 47,100 Small Scale Industrial (SSI) Units with investment of RS 17.37 billions employing 3,37,000 persons.

In the year 2000, there are 2612 Nos. of Registered Factories in the state of Orissa, of which 1852 Nos. of factories are working. The total employment in the factory is 138804 of which 5513 are female workers and 133291 are male workers.

Position of large and Medium Industries in Orissa
YearNo. of units gone into productionInvestment(RS in crore)
By the end of 7th Plan (By 1989-90)2311044.88
1990-912029.79
1995-9613
1996-97629.82

Source: Industrial Promotion and Investment Corporation of Orissa Ltd.

Position of Small Scale Industries in Orissa
YearNo. of SSI units setupInvestment(RS in crore)
By the end of 7th Plan (By 1989-90)35867437.26
1990-91224961
1995-96250774.82
1996-973098104.53

Source: Directorate of Industries Orissa

Updated on October 2000

STATE GOVERNMENT ORGANISATIONS AND CORPORATIONS INVOLVED IN PROMOTION OF INDUSTRIES
  • Directorate Of Export Promotion Marketing
  • Industrial Promotion And Investment Corporation Of Orissa Ltd.(IPICOT)
  • Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation Of Orissa (LIDCO).
  • Orissa State Financial Corporation (OSTC)
  • Orissa Small Industries Corporation (OSIC)
  • Directorate Of Technical Education And Training. (DTET)
  • The Agricultural Promotion And Investment Corporation Of Orissa Limited (APICOL)

1. Directorate Of Export Promotion Marketing (DEPM )

Directorate of Export Promotion and Marketing has been set up to promote export of goods from the State of Orissa and to provide marketing assistance to SSI units of the State. It endeavors to establish infrastructure including establishment of Export promotion Industrial Park etc. This Directorate registers SSI Units and concludes rate contract for purchases by Govt. departments and undertakings.

2. Industrial promotion and investment corporation of Orissa ltd. (APICOL)

The Industrial Promotion investment Corporation of Orissa Ltd. (IPICOL) has been established with the principal objective of promoting large and medium scale industries in the State.

APICOL through the Industrial Co-ordination Bureau provides assistance and guidance to entrepreneurs in project identification, project finance, preparation of project report, getting registration and license, obtaining clearance from various authorities and statutory bodies and removal of operational constraints for medium and large scale units

3. Industrial infrastructure development corporation of Orissa ( IIDCO).

The Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation of Orissa (IIDCO) is the Nodal Agency for Providing industrial infrastructure needs to the entrepreneurs intending to establish industrial ventures in Orissa.

SERVICES RENDERED
  • Establishment of Industrial Areas, Industrial Estates, Functional Estates, Growth Centers etc.
  • Allotment of developed plots and built up sheds to entrepreneurs on long term leasehold basis.
  • Allotment of Commercial shops
  • Creation, improvement and maintenance of infrastructural facilities
  • For the projects in large and medium sectors which can not be set up within the existing Estates, IIDCO helps them in identifying and acquiring private for the industry.
  • Industrial Growth Centers of about 1000 acres each are being established at Duburi, Chhatrapur and Jharsuguda.
  • Three Mini Growth Centers are also being established at Khurda, Rayagada and ParadIp under the Integrated Infrastructure Dev. Scheme of Govt. of India.

4. Orissa state financial corporation (OSFC)

The Orissa State Financial Corporation(OSFC) extends term loan upto a maximum of Rs.150.00 lakh for acquiring fixed assets, for setting up industries and also Provides working Capital assistance under Single window scheme. Priority is given to small and tiny sector industrial units in backward areas.

The Corporation provides term loan upto Rs. 150.00 lakhs to small and medium scale industries

5. Orissa small industries corporation (OSIC)

The Orissa Small Industries Corporation plays a vital role for promotion of small scale industries in the State. It provides marketing assistance and raw material assistance. It deals with quality raw materials like iron and steel, aluminium, wax rubber, plastics, coal, bitumen etc. OSIC also imports scare raw materials to meet the requirements of small scale industries.

6. Directorate of technical education and training. (DTET)

Directorate of Technical Education Training looks after the planning, implementation and monitoring of technical education at degree, diploma and craftsman training level. The State of Orissa is one of the very few States in the country where the technical education is under the direct administrative control of the Department of Industries. For rapid industrialization, the role of technical education need not be overemphasized. The Industrial Policy 1996 has stressed the need for development of technical education and also encouraging participation of the private sector in the area so that the existing and upcoming industries do not face shortage of adequately skilled manpower.

The members of technical institutes functioning in the State along with their intake capacity is as follows:

InstitutionNumberIntake capacity (annual)
Engineering College204124
Engineering Schools/ Polytechnics.253550
Industrial Training Institute11416108

7. The agricultural promotion and Investment Corporation of Orissa Ltd. (APICOL)

It is the promotional organisation for providing assistance to agricultural enterprises and agricultural investors to begin, process, expand or modernize their enterprise. It helps promotion of agro-based industries in the State.

Manufacturing sector

MANUFACTURING SECTOR

3.1. MAJOR INDUSTRIES

Number of registered factories in the state of Orissa are 2612 (As on 2000) and the average daily numbers of industrial workers are 1,38,804. The distribution of employments in organized sector of Orissa is given below:

TypeTotal Employment During 2002
Public Sector63,447
Private Sector75,357

According to the quick estimated Gross State Domestic Product at factor cost at current prices for the year 1997-98, it is observed that after agriculture sector the major contributors to the list are trade, hotel and restaurants (in combination), which is followed by the manufacturing sectors of the state. The percentage contribution of each sector in the growth of the state of Orissa is given below.

Details of industry1995-96(R)1996-97(P)1997-98(Q)
Agriculture30.5%23.8%26%
Forestry & Logging2.7%3.2%2.8%
Fishing2.1%2.8%2.5%
Mining & quarrying4.8%5.2%4.8%
Manufacturing13.6%13.3%13.2%
Construction6.7%8%8%
Electricity, gas and water supply3.3%3.5%3.5%
Transport, storage, & communication6.1%6.9%6.6%
Trade, hotels & restaurants14.4%14.4%14.1%
Banking & Insurance3.2%3.8%3.9%
Real estate, ownership of dwellings & business services.1.8%2.2%2.1%
Public Administration5%5.8%5.7%
Other services5.8%7.1%6.8%

As per the above statistics, manufacturing sectors the third largest economic sector in the state of Orissa can be divided into two groups as follows.

  • Large and Medium Industries
  • Small Scales Industries.
3.2 MAJOR INDUSTRIAL CONCENTRATION - DISTRIBUTION

The state of Orissa consists of 30 districts in total. The distribution of industrial concentration is given in the following table.

Distribution of Registered Factories by Districts in Orissa
DistrictRegistered reporting factoriesTotal Employees
Angul3411774
Balasore1187712
Bargarh626099
Bhadrak391152
Bolangir503407
Boudh--
Cuttack19514932
Deogarh125
Dhenkanal345045
Gajpati326
Ganjam802976
Jagatsinghpur223020
Jajpur222757
Jarsuguda339991
Kalanhandi261721
Kandhamal3206
Kendrapara643
Keonjhar284726
Khurda28836799
Koraput395262
Malkangiri220
Mayurbhanj502829
Nabarangpur12653
Nyagarh7375
Nuapada17499
Puri27662
Rayagada264750
Sambalpur995558
Sonepur2757
Sundargarh21744096
Total1540177860
3.3. INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES, STRIKES, LOCKOUTS AND MANDAYS LOST

The status of the Industrial disputes in the state is very much stable but slightly in declining nature since 1999 onwards except the year 2000 when these were marginally increased. The following table will give an overall impression in this regard.

Disputes classified by different types of industries in Orissa
Sl. No.Type of DisputesNo. Of disputes
  1999200020012002
1.Strikes24283224
2.Lock-outs16181211

Different types of factories engaged in the manufacturing process are given below.

Sl. No.Category of Factories
01.Manufacturing of Food Products and Beverages.
02.Manufacturing of Tobacco Products
03.Manufacturing of Textiles
04.Manufacturing of Wearing Apparel, Dressing and Dyeing of Fur
05.Tanning and Dressing of Leather, Manufacture of Luggage, Handbags, Saddlery, Harness and Footwear
06.Manufacture of wood and of products of wood and cork, except furniture, manufacture of Articles of Straw and Plaiting materials.
07.Manufacture of Paper and Paper Products
08.Publishing, Printing and Reproduction of Recorded Media.
09.Manufacture of Coke, Refine Petroleum Products and Nuclear Fuel.
10.Manufacture of Chemicals and Chemicals Products.
11.Manufacture of Rubber and Plastics Products
12.Manufacture of other non-metallic Mineral Products
13.Manufacture of Basic Metals
14.Manufacture of Fabricated Metal Products except machinery and Equipment
15.Manufacture of machinery & Equipment N. E. C.
16.Manufacture of Electrical Machinery and Apparatus N. E. C.
17.Manufacture of Radio, Television and Communication Equipment and Apparatus.
18.Manufacture of Medical, Precision and Optical Instruments, Watches and Clocks.
19.Manufacture of other transport Equipment.
20.Manufacture of Furniture, Manufacturing N. E. C.
21.Electricity, Gas, Steam and Hot Water Supply.
22.Collection, Purification and Distribution of Water.
23.Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motor Vehicles and Motor Cycles, Retail Sale of Automotive Fuel.
24.Whole Sale Trade and Commission Trade, Except of Motor Vehicles and Motor Cycles.
25.Supporting and Auxiliary Transport Activities, Activities of Travel Agencies.
26.Other Business Activities.
27.Recreational, Cultural and Supporting Activities
PORTS

Orissa is endowed with a long coastline of 480 kms. along the Bay of Bengal, interspersed with numerous ports like Dhamra (Chandbali), Bahabalpur etc.

Paradip is the deepest port in India and is the main entry/exit point for sea borne trade in eastern India, catering particularly to Orissa, Bihar, eastern Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. It is emerging as a premium port of the country.

The Port handles upto 12 meter draught and has a mechanized iron ore berth in addition to other cargo berths, 4 wharf cranes of 13.2 MT capacity each, a 500 tones slipway and requisite cargohandling and storage facilities.

Paradip is at present handling large quantities of thermal coal, oil, gas and other petroleum related products. In addition, the proposed oil refinery near Paradip and eventual follow-up with apetrochemical complex is expected to further raise the shipment volumes of oil and related products at a very fast rate. The port has its own railway system and is also connected with the broad gauge railway system of the South Eastern Railway. It is served by National Highway No. 5A.

The traffic projections for coastal shipment of thermal coal from the State have been estimated at 10 million tons by the year 2010 and 60 million tons by 2015. Apart from this, there will be tremendous growth in the cargo profile of exports, especially in areas of aluminum, steel, marine products, other minerals etc.

Administration of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act, 1986 and the Regulations framed there under and the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 and the Rules framed there under :

The Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act, 1986 and the Regulations, 1990 framed there under provide for the Safety, Health and Welfare of Dock Workers in the major port of India as per the Major Ports Act, 1963. These statutes cover safety, health and welfare aspects of all the workers engaged in dock-work whether in loading or unloading of cargo on board ship, alongside it or in transit sheds, warehouses, or yard etc. within the port premises including those engaged in chipping and painting of ships. These statutes are in line with ILO Convention No. 152 on Occupational Safety and Health (Dock Work).

Administration of the Dock Workers (Safety, Health and Welfare) Act 1986 and the Regulations 1990 is carried out by the Ministry of Labour, through DGFASLI, Mumbai. The Director General is the Chief Inspector of the Dock Safety appointed under the Act. The Chief Inspector of Dock Safety is also an authority for enforcement of the Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 framed under the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986, in the major ports.

The Inspector posted at Inspectorate Dock Safety Paradip enforces the above statutes.

Details of Inspections and other visits in Paradip Port during the year 2002 are given below.

PortsShipDockGearIsolated Storage/ PipelinesOther Visits
Paradip7637501152

The Investigations into Fatal Accidents/Dangerous Occurrences in Paradip port during the year 2002 is 1.

The Safety Committee meeting/Safety Weeks Celebration in Paradip Port during the year 2002 is 4.

Reportable Accidents & Dangerous Occurrences in Paradip Port during the year 2002 is given below:

PortFatalNon-FatalDangerous Occurrences
Paradip121

Manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES COVERED UNDER THE FACTORIES ACT & BOILERS ACT

39 factories have been identified in the State of Orissa as major accident hazard units which have been classified as per the threshold quantities of chemicals and hazardous substances stored/used/handled as per Schedule III of Orissa Factories (Control of Major Accident Hazard) Rules, 2001.

TABLE - 1

List of M. A. H Factories Under Orissa Factories (Control of Major Accident Hazard) Rule, 2001

Sl. No.Name of the FactoryName of Hazardous Chemical involvedQuantity Stored HandledThreshold Quantity Prescribed
01.Emami Paper Mills Balgopalpur, BalasoreChlorine14.4T10T
02.HPCL Depot Somanathpur, BalasoreHighly flammable liquid12,000T10,000T
03.IOCL Depot.Somanathpur, BalasoreHighly flammable liquid12,000T10,000T
04.GMB Ceramics Ltd.Somanathpur, BalasoreL.P.G.50T25T
05.INDANE Bottling Plant of IOCL, Chandipur, BalasoreL.P.G.1,250T25T
06.Jayashree Chemicals Ltd., Jayashree, GanjamChlorine375T10T
07.Ballarpur Industries Ltd., Unit-Sewa, Jeypore, KoraputChlorine90T10T
08.NALCO (Refinery) Damanjodi, KoraputChlorine H.F.O.90T 15,000T10T 5,000T
09.Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. Sunabeda, KorapurHydrogen Fluoride8T5T
10.ParadIp Phosphate Ltd. ParadIp, JagatsinghpurAmmonia50,000T50T
11.Coastal Oil Installation of BPCL ParadIp, JagatsinghpurHighly flammable liquid43,643T10,000T
12.Lighterage Terminal of IOCL, Paradip, JagatsinghpurHighly flammable liquid1,14,000T10,000T
13.Paradeep Terminal of IOCL, Paradeep, JagatsinghpurHighly flammable liquid1,83,899T10,000T
14.OSWAL Chemicals and Fertilizers Ltd, Paradeep, JagatsinghpurAmmonia40,000T50T
15.C. M. Power & Gas Pvt. Ltd.L.P.G.900T25T
16.NALCO (CPP) NALCO Nagar, Angul(i) Chlorine
(ii) Hydrogen
67.6T
20,365T
10T
2T
17.TSTPP of NTPC Kaniha, AngulChlorine39.6T10T
18.NALCO (SMELTER), NALCO Nagar, AngulAcetylene35T5T
19.Fertilizer Corporation Ltd., Vikrampur, AngulAmmonia--
20.TTPS of NTPC Talcher Thermal, AngulHydrogen30T2T
21.OCL India Ltd. (Refractory Unit) Rajgangpur, SundergarhCarbon Monoxide
Hydrogen
Producer Gas
15,000M3
9,000 M3
75000 M3
15T
2T
15T
22.Rourkela Steel Plant
Rourkela, Sundergarh
Carbon Monoxide
Liquid Oxygen
Benzene
636T
1309T
3233T
15T
200T
Compulsory
23.Fertilizer Plant SAIL Rourkela, SundergarhArsenicTrioxide
Hydrogen
Ammonia
Nickel Oxide
15T
2T
60T
27T
1000 KG.
2T
5oT
1T
24.Synthochlor India Kalunga, SundergarhChlorine18T10T
25.J. K. Paper Mills, RayagadaChlorine150T10T
26.LPG Bottling Plant of BPCL, KhurdhaL. P. G.370T25T
27.LPG Bottling Plant of BPCL, Jatni, KhurdhaL. P. G.1970T25T
28.IOCL DEPOT, Jatni, KhurdhaHighly flammable liquid14,275T10,000T
29.LPG Bottling Plant of IOCL, JharsugudaChlorine10T10,T
30.IB Thermal Power Station Banharpalli, JharsugudaChlorine10T10,T
31.TATA Refractories Ltd. Belpahar, JaharsugudaHighly flammable liquid
Carbon Monoxide
20,290T
6,8000NM3
10,000T
15T
32.Orient Paper Mills Brajarajnagar, JharsugudaChlorine100T10T
33.ORDNANCE Factory, Badmal, BolangirChlorine18T10T
34.Mangalam Timber Products Ltd., Nabarangpur, KalahandiFormaldehyde10.5T5T
35.Nilachal Ispat Nigam Ltd., Duburi, JajpurCoke Oven Gas
BF Gas
LPG
42,190NM3
1,17,000NM3
30T
15T
15T
25
36.Konark Met Coke Ltd., Duburi, JajpurCarbon Monoxide3,712X10 5NM315T
37.Kalinga Iron Works, Barbil, KeonjharCarbon Monoxide27,000M315T
38.Suvochem industries Pvt. Ltd., Jagatpur, CuttackChlorine15T10T
39.Ballarpur Industries Ltd., Choudwar, CuttackChlorine36T10T

20 districts have formulated the Districts Crisis Group as required under Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules 1989. The district-wise information is given below:

TABLE - 2

List of Districts where district crisis groups have been constituted

Sl. No.DistrictNo. of M. A. H. Factories
01.Balasore5
02.MayurbhanjNil
03.Cuttack2
04.Rayagada1
05.Angul5
06.Jharsuguda4
07.BuapadaNil
08.BargarhNil
09.Jaipur2
10.Jagatsinghpur6
11.Sundergarh4
12.Korapur3
13.Nabarangpur1
14.KalahandiNil
15.Keonjhar1
16.Khurdha3
17.SambalpurNil
18.PuriNil
19.Ganjam1
20.SonepurNil

N.B. Remaining districts are in the process of formation of District Crisis Group

TABLE – 3

REGION-WISE DISTRIBUTION OF INDUSTRIES IN ORISSA

Regional OfficeDistrictsUnits IdentifiedUnits closed
BhubaneswarKhurda, Puri9210
BalasoreBalasore, Bhadrak, Mayurbhanj5904
CuttackCuttack, Jagatsinghpur, Kendrapara, Jaipur, Part of Keonjhar District10102
SambalpurSambalpur, Jharsuguda, Boudh, Sonepur, Bargarh, Nuapada, Bolangir Part of Sundargarh district21500
RayagadaRayagada, Koraput, Nawarangpur, Malkangiri, Kalahandi17904
RourkelaSundargarh, Keonjhar, Deogarh10305
BerhampurGanjam, Phulbani, Gajapati, Nayagarh Part of Khurda district5000
AngulAngul Dhenkanal5606
Total3085531
TABLE – 4

HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS HANDLED IN ORISSA

SL. No.Hazardous ChemicalsAnnual Production in MTAnnual Consumption MT
01.Hydrochloric acid2354410527.95
02.Chlorine13483.6019320.69
03.Sodium Hydroxide2254827084.54
04.Acetylene288000 m3240 m3
05.Rectified Spirit (Flammable liquid)37.57 lakh BL-
06.Denatured Spirit (Flammable liquid)21436 BL32 BL
07.Nitric acid306800317186.84
08.Naphthalene334-
09.Chloroform216-
10.Carbolic acid (Phenol)14312680
11.Phosphoric acid225000225057.80
12.Sulphuric acid707970689 m 891.02
13.Benzene2.513-
14.Toluene68118.60
15.Nitrobenzene165-
16.Nitrocellulose180-
17.Ammonia214600230014.90
18.Methanol61201562.18
19.Hydrogen Peroxide-605.57
20.Hydrazine Hydrate 2.00
21.Chromic Acid 94.50
22.Monoethylene Glycol 16158.00
23.Ammonium Nitrate 20931.00
24.Formaldehyde 4232.53
25.Diethylene Glycol 100.00
26.Sodium Sulphide 2.00
27.Chromium Anhydride 2.20
28.Copper sulphate 0.60
29.Copper cyanide 0.06
30.Cadmium oxide 0.70
31.Hydrofluoric acid 4.20
32.Sodium cyanide 0.24
33.Trichloroethylene 11.00
34.Acetone 9515.70
35.Ethylene diamine 360.00
36.Calcium Carbide 530.00
37.Aluminium Fluoride 5726.00
38.Formic Acid 320.00
39.Phthalic Anhydride 120.00
40.Acetic Acid 1000.10
41.Potassium Cyanide 0.06
42.Cuprous chloride 21.00
43.Toluene Di-isocyanate (TDI) 94.00
44.Methylene Chloride 9.00
TABLE – 5

INDUSTRIES HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

CategoryNo. of industries handling Hazardous Chemicals
As Raw-materialsAs Products
Large Scale4110
Medium Scale138
Small Scale4237
Total9655
TABLE – 6

CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PRONE AREAS OF ORISSA

Sl. No.AreaHazardous Chemicals HandledType of Hazards
1.ParadeepAmmonia, Sulphuric Acid, Phosphoric Acid, Petroleum ProductsToxic Gas Release, Fire Hazard
2.RourkelaCarbon Monoxide, Ammonia, Liquid Oxygen, Naptha Chlorine, Coal ChemicalsToxic Gas, Fire and Explosion
3.GanjamChlorineToxic Gas
4.Angul-TalcherExplosives, ChlorineToxic Gas Fire
5.BalasoreChlorine, LPG, Petroleum ProductsToxic Gas, Fire
6.Khurda-JatniLPG, Petroleum ProductsFire
TABLE – 7

CATEGORIES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATED IN ORISSA

Sl. No.Name of the DistrictHazardous Waste (TPA)% age
RecyclableInsuperableLand disposableTotal
01.Angul1340.653112944.7614316.4117.6769
02.Balasore1822.865.982.131970.832.4334
03.Bargarh57.8-1.559.30.0732
04.Bhadrak213.0-1.0214.00.2642
05.Bolangir5.03.893.44102.240.1262
06.Cuttack39.82172.52511.15723.490.8933
07.Dhenkanal322.604.1562.396389.1460.4804
08.Ganjam14.011.016751690.012.0867
09.Jagatsinghpur110.5-1927319380.523.9297
10.Jaipur131.5-721.69853.191.0534
11.Jharsuguda431.566.56625.727063.788.7218
12.Kalahandi1.8-12.013.80.0170
13.Keonjhar102.35-7054.1737156.5238.8363
14.Khurda9.80.187.5717.550.0216
15.Koraput77.52.022.846102.3460.1263
16.Mayurbhanj43.9-82.17126.070.1556
17.Nawarangpur1.6-6.07.600.0093
18.Puri--1.71.70.0020
19.Rayagada943.64--943.641.1651
20.Sambalpur182.751.82540.42724.953.3645
21.Sundargarh8450.8778.214602.9823132.0528.5619
 Total14303.45367.0566318.625 100.00

Occupational injuries in manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES
(COVERED UNDER THE FACTORIES ACT, 1948 ( AMENDED 1987 ) 1948)

5.1. PRESENT STATUS

The State of Orissa has 2758 number of registered factories in 2001, covered under the Factories Act, 1948. In the year 2001, there were 812 reportable accidents in these factories. Out of which 20 are fatal and 792 non-fatal injuries. All the cases of fatal injuries were analyzed (special events any).

For classification of accidents the Indian Standards 3786-1983 titled “Method for computation of frequency and severity rates in industrial injuries” and Classification of Industrial accidents along with ILO Codes of practice on recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases were used. The industries were classified according to the new industrial classification – 1987 NIC Code. The fatal and non-fatal injuries have been dealt with separately.

5.2 FATAL INJURIES

The fatal injuries in the State of Orissa as reported in the annual returns submitted by the factories for the year 2001 is 20. The 20 fatal injuries are recorded in the 5 types of industries and analyzed as per Indian Standard 3786 and the ILO code of practice of recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases. The analysis has been done industry group-wise, cause-wise, and agency-wise, nature of injury-wise, location of injury-wise, size and age-wise and given in the Table.

5.3. INDUSTRY-WISE

Of the 20 fatal injuries in 2001 analyzed, 7 accidents each were in the units manufacturing basic metals and alloy industries and electricity generation which was followed by the units of manufacturers of jute and other fiber textiles with 9 accidents. In industry-wise analysis of fatal accidents show that 35% of the accidents each in the industry of basic metal and allow industries and electricity generation, transmission and distribution of power, 10% each in the manufacturing of basic chemicals and chemical including fire works, manufacture of rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products, processing of nuclear fuels and manufacture of non-metallic mineral products are given below:

Table-1

Industry-wise Distribution of Fatal Accidents

Sl. No.IndustryNo. of Accidents%
1.Manufacture of basic chemicals and chemicals products including fire work210.0
2.Manufacture of Rubber, Plastic, petroleum and Coal Products, processing of nuclear fuels210.0
3.Manufacture of Non-Metallic, Mineral Products210.0
4.Basic Metals and Alloy Industries735.0
5.Electricity, generation, transmission and distribution735.0
Total20100%
TABLE - 2

Officers under the Chief Inspector of Factories & Boilers, Orissa

DesignationNo. of sanctioned postRemarks
Joint Chief Inspector of Factories & Boilers1Exist (Vacant)
Joint Chief Inspector of Factories (Chemical)NilNo such post exist
Joint Chief Inspector of Factories (Medical)NilNo such post exist
Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories4Exist
Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories (Chemical)NilNo such post exist
Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories (Medical)NilNo such post exist
Inspector of Factories2007 post vacant
Inspector of Factories (Chemical)1Vacant
Medical Inspector of Factories 1Exist
Jr. Inspector of FactoriesNilNo such post exist
Industrial ChemistNilNo such post exist
StatisticianNilOne post of Statistical Assistant and one post of Junior statistical Assistant present available
Administrative Officer

(Establishment Officer)
1Exist
TABLE - 3

Number of registered factories

Category of factories19981999200020012002
Factories under Section 2(m)(i) (Manufacturing Process with power employing 10 or more workers).22152238233124622400
Factories under Section 2(m)(ii) (Manufacturing process without power employing 20 or more workers)869710411491
Factories notified under Section 85176176177182336
Total24772511261227582827
TABLE - 4

Distribution of new factories registered during 2002
(A = Number of factories; B = Number workers)

Category of factoriesUp to 19 workers20 or more but less than 50 workers50 or more but less than 100 workers100 or more but less than 500 workers500 or more workersTotal
ABABABABABAB
Section 2 (m)(i)506958522186600---1413513
Section 85979120------1099
TABLE- 5

Number of visits to factories by the Inspectors

YearRegistered factoriesUnregistered factoriesNon-amenable factoriesTotal
U/S 2 (m)U/S 85U/S 2(m)U/S 85
199920973526045-2437
200020093927148-2367
200119414233639-2358
200217824026755-2144
TABLE - 6

Approval of Plans

YearNew constructionAdditional installation of plans/ machineryExtensionOthersTotal
1998114352006175
1999126291809182
2000149381407208
2001211321912274
2002154372111223
TABLE – 7

Average daily number of workers employed in major industrial groups in statutory returns furnished by the employers

A = Number of factories submitting returns;

B = Average daily number of workers employed.

Item199719981999200022012002
ABABABABABAB
Cotton textile3310765349425508480304291334884304141
Jute525875245852535216633140562467
Paper and paper products41104844310080206636216261256309234669
Rubber and rubber products124841272412010120831202612007
Chemicals and chemical products10185191001016810892916479188510403938772
Engineering9153039555261056077774410754156723940
Electricity11760612828213856796053137322158625
Other industries1015709199437458995275295661639047066506674367910
TABLE - 8

District-wise average daily number of workers employed in factories

(Submitting returns)
Name of the DistrictAverage daily number of workers employed (submitting returns)
199719981999200020012002
Angul114751157810828108131081910920
Balasore812082167624771678267635
Bargarh526353625213536453205575
Bhadrak150416171597147814651435
Bolangir248525462608258925742496
Boudh426810397107105
Cuttack143201441513725122151397613025
Deogarh282832292827
Dhenkanal350436703689357533973289
Gajpati262632272925
Ganjam312030162915281928952927
Jagatsinghpur407542174121410552175486
Jajpur277527942678265227842984
Jharsuguda699570166927681668766755
Kalahandi223522272103206522092294
Kandhamal849085747882
Kendrapara275268296283325375
Keonjhar532052475142521753835292
Khurda149451556016117163191547415920
Koraput911592648157814582378354
Malkangiri325334364380402422
Mayurbhanj284728072705265025282602
Nabarangpur625607507602642607
Nyagarh575664552512674653
Nuapada389456432419449459
Puri675709701671607605
Rayagada523549064521429744044456
Sambalpur542053795285458543974296
Sonepur385410387267284284
Sundaragarh352623501334093320232628023144
Total147444148510143539138804135686132529
TABLE - 9

Distribution of registered factories district-wise in the State of Orissa

Name of the District199719981999200020012002
Angul333339424649
Balasore179176179180186173
Bargarh95100107111117109
Bhadrak525454565657
Bolangir79818484883
Boudh020303040506
Cuttack333316315339354350
Deogarh030303030303
Dhenkanal555559617071
Gajapati070704040405
Ganjam154156130134138145
Jagatsinghpur434143474950
Jajpur606264596468
Jharsuguda454546495050
Kalahandi424953576267
Kandhamal050505050502
Keonjhar505354576677
Kendrapara323033373942
Khurda419417421444491516
Koraput697988919397
Malkangiri030305050912
Mayurbhanj798281817889
Nawarangpur101114141617
Nyagarh212223212631
Nuapada252523232529
Puri605960615759
Rayagada373940486269
Sambalpur137138142145142139
Sonepur090909080909
Sundaragarh308324330342349351
Total244624772511261227582827
Table - 10

Total employment

ITEM1999200020012002
Total employment143539138804135686132529
Employment in new factories registered during 2002---3812
Employment in old factories registered during 2002----
Total employment in factories registered during 2002---3812
Table –11

Employment of women in factories

YearNumber of factories where women workers are employedAverage daily number of women workers employed
19973626975
19983687225
19993666977
20003485513
20013565658
20023495668
Table –12

Accident in factories

YearNumber of accidentsIncidence rate per 1000 workersFrequency rate per 1 million man-hours worked
Fatal Non-fatalTotal
1987273237326430.5916
1988283024305229.0114
1989232592261523.9212
1990162085210118.4110
1991123489350127.0914
1992273763379033.1616
19933730643101295915
1994293083311228.2314
1995423249329129.9415
1996322267229921.8210
1997412067210822.3610
1998201888190816.758
1999221027104911.755
200035996103114.748
20012079281210.255
20023467570912.786
Table-13

Industry -wise Accidents

YearJuteEngineeringCottonChemical
TotalIncidence rate(per 1000 workers)TotalIncidence rate (per 1000 workers)TotalIncidence rate (per 1000 workers)TotalIncidence rate (per 1000 workers)
1989146.209918.09102285.3410815.78
199012270.768416.0658247.736914.14
1991574263.547513.071635129.76466.43
1992535214.517824.871420118.096512.68
1993326129.788225.1899577.30398.77
1994337130.475214.781192116.60577.31
199514157.276512.081117102.477823.71
1996333134.389417.2567062.03515.97
1997302116.747213.5852348.58239.74
1998362147.2710218.4631636.71359.34
199920480.47304.9420524.17323.44
20007645.704710.6513538.455637.38
20015237.014611.078417.20147.11
2002228.91246.099021.73121.37
Table-14
Cause-wise distribution of accidents
Causes19921993199419951996199719981999200020012002
Machinery425415408425209210205104975765
Struck by falling body494479485493225201197102917162
Stepping on or striking against object392376384371275245205107938473
Handling of goods545502493478374395372194179164156
Persons falling (PFA+PEL+PFP)645504515574276220208186177104106
Hand tools445416377385324399244202188146138
Fires2226272312131151097
Gassing182022191014961586
Others80436340152359441145714318116996
Total379031013112329122992108190810491031812709
Table –15

Agency-wise distribution of fatal accidents

Agency% of fatal accidents in the year 2001
Machinery moved by mechanical power5.0
Other vehicles10.0
Electricity20.0
Molten metal, other not or corrosive substances15.0
Struck by falling bodies5.0
Person falling25.0
Striking on or striking against objects5.0
Handling goods or articles10.0
Others10.0
Total100.00
Table - 16

Industry-wise distribution of fatal accidents

IndustryNumber of accidents in the year 2001
Manufacturing of food products-
Manufacturing of cotton textiles-
Manufacturing of paper and paper products and printing, publishing and allied industries-
Manufacture of basic chemicals and chemical products including fire works2
Manufacturing of rubber, plastics, petroleum and coal products, processing of nuclear fuels2
Manufacturing of non-metallic mineral products2
Basic metal and alloy industries7
Manufacturing of metal products and parts except machinery and transport equipment-
Electricity generation, transmission and distribution7
Total20
Table –17

Employment position of safety officers in factories

YearNumber of factories notified for employment of safety officers Number of safety officers requiredNumbers of safety officers actually employed
19985410986
19995310886
200055131103
20015012398
20025111991

ACTIVITIES OF THE DIRECTORATE OF BOILERS AT THE STATE OF ORISSA

5.4. INTRODUCTION

The main function of Directorate of Boilers is administering the two enactments i.e. Factories Act, 1948 and Indian Boiler Act, 1923. The department of Boilers is to ensure safety to human life properly by following the sound manufacturing practice, safe operation and proper maintenance of the boilers by implementing the provisions of the Indian Boiler Act, 1923 and the regulation made there under.

Safety is ensured at the time of manufacturing stage of the boilers by implementing the Boiler Regulations 1950 with different codes of national and international.

5.5. ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

The administrative set up of the boilers directorate is shown separately.

Administrative Structure of the Boiler Directorate

(Organisation Chart)

orissa

The following rules have been framed by the State Government for the safe operation and maintenance of boilers.

  • Orissa Boilers Rules 1971
  • Orissa Boiler Attendant Rules 1956
  • Orissa Boiler Operation Engineers Rules, 2000.

By the above rules, the Department of Boilers ensure adherence to specification in scrutiny of design drawing for manufacture of boilers and other spare parts; construction; instillations; safe operation and maintenance of boilers and steam pipe lines in the State. Apart from annual inspection of boilers; conducting inspection during repair of defective boilers and declare fit for further use. The department conducts written, oral and practical examination by the board of Examiners and issue certificate to the qualified boiler attendants as well as the boiler operation engineers for smooth operation of boilers. Apart form this, the department conducts welder test and issue certificates to the qualified welders and revalidate the certificates basing on their performance. In addition to this supervise and coordinate in the case of installation of major boilers in Power Plants like NALCO, NTPC, and issue certificates or recognition to suitable>

5.6. BRANCH OFFICES

In order to exercise effective control over manufacture and erection of Boilers and its inspection in different parts of the State, there are some Offices located at different places, which are as follows.

Name and Addresses of Offices:
  • Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Orissa, Unit-3, Bhubaneswar.
  • Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Bhubaneswar Division, Bhubaneswar
  • Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Cuttack Division, Surya Vihar, Link Road, Cuttack.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Angul zone, Nalco Nagar, Angul.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Balasore, Zone Raja Bagicha, Balasore.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Jajpur Zone, Choroda, Jajpur Road, Jajpur.
  • Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Rourkela Division, Uduit Nagar, Rourkela, Sundargarh.
  • Inspector of factories and Boilers, Sambalpur Zone, Jail Road, Sambalpur.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Keonjhar Zone, Ph. No.228/677, Keonjhar Garh, Keonjhar.
  • Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Rayagada Division, At/PO/Dist. Rayagada.
  • Inspector of factories and Boilers, Sunabeda Zone, PWD Colony, Sunabdea Koraput.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Baragarh Zone, VI B, Sarasvathi Vihar, Baragarh.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Bolangir Zone, Palace Line, Bolangir.
  • Inspector of Factories and Boilers, Berhampur Zone, Plot No.12, Bhabha Nagar, Berhampur, Ganjam
5.7. DIFFERENT PROJECT WORKS FOR BOILER INSTALLATION.

Information is not available in this Directorate.

5.8. TESTING LABORATORY

In this State, the testing laboratory has not yet been set up by the state Government for this purpose.

5.9. BAR CHART SHOWING POPULATION OF BOILERS BASED ON WORKING PRESSURE

RatingNumber of Boilers
01042
112571
265070
517571
7610080
10115069
15120011
20140015
40160010
60180011
801100014
100112003
120114001
140116004
160118004
180120009
20012200-
220124002
240126002
260128001
28013000-
3001And above64
0100334
10020070

orissa

PIE DIAGRAM SHOWING POPULATION OF BOILER BASED ON AGE

Not maintained yet.

WELDERS TRAINING CENTRE

Nil

INSTALLATION OF COMPUTER

Nil

BAR CHART SHOWING NUMBER OF BOILERS INSPECTED, CERTIFIED AND RECOMMENDED FOR REPAIRS DURING 1999 – 2001
ItemYear
199920002001
No. of Boilers inspected669681710
No. of Boilers certified474510643
No. of boilers recommended for repair878283

orissa

BAR CHART SHOWING FOR NUMBER OF ECONOMIZERS INSPECTED, CERTIFIED AND RECOMMENDED FOR REPAIRS DURING 1999-2001

Nil

BAR CHART SHOWING THE REVENUE RECEIPTS DURING 1997-1998 TO 2001 –2002
Financial YearRevenue receipts (Rs. in lakh)
1997 – 19981400
1998 – 19991419
1999 – 20001523
2000 – 20012431
2001 – 20022380

orissa

ACTIVITIES OF TESTING LABORATORY RADIOGRAPHY, MACRO, MICRO, EXAMINATION DURING THE YEARS

This Directorate has no testing laboratory for conducting the tests.

ACTIVITIES OF WELDERS TEST CERTIFICATE ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1999-2002
YearCertificate issued
NewRevalidation
1999930
2000231
2001951
2002-21
INSPECTION OF BOILERS UNDER USE
Item1999200020012002
No. of Boilers inspected669681710667
No. of economizers----
No. of Boilers certified474510643488
No. of Economizers certified----
No. of Boilers recommended for repairs87828391
No. of economizer recommended----
TRANSFER OF BOILERS
Item1999200020012002
No. of boilers/economizers transferred from the State5211
No. of boilers/economizers shifted to this State82119
ACCIDENT

Only one accident occurred during the year 2002.

Industrial Hygiene,Occupational diseases and poisoning in manufacturing activities

OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES AND POISONING IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES

6.1. INTRODUCTION

ILO code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases defines occupational diseases as “ a disease contracted as a result of an exposure to risk factors arising from work activity ”. Under Section 89 of Factories Act, 1948 where any worker in a factory contracts any disease specified in the Third Schedule, the manager of the factory shall send a notice thereof to such authorities and in such form and within such time as may be prescribed.

Any Medical Practitioner attending on a person who is or has been employed in a factory and is suffering from diseases specified in the Third schedule shall also without delay send a report in writing to the office of the Chief Inspector of Factory of the respective state..

The cases of suspected occupational diseases were examined by the Central Labour Institute, Mumbai, Regional Labour Institute, Kolkata and State E.S.I. Scheme from time to time. The result of such examination is appended below :

SURVEY REPORT
Name of the Occupational DiseasesYearName of the Org./Inst. conducted the surveyNo. of person examinedNo. of suspected casesNo.of confirmed cases
SILICOSIS1989Factory Dir., Orissa & ESI Scheme, Orissa46513631
  - do -537165118
 1992Factory Dir., Orissa & RLI, Calcutta.18119NIL
 1994Factory Dir., Orissa & ESI Dispensary, Choudwar8674
  Factory Dir., Orissa & CLI, Mumbai.300-5
 1995Factory Dir., Orissa & ESI Dispensary and Indian Red Cross.350NILNIL
  Factory Dir., Orissa & ESI Scheme, Orissa.16223NIL
 1996Factory Dir., Orissa & CLI, Mumbai290NILNIL
  - do -2866
  TOTAL2399356153
PNEUMO- CONIOSIS1980 to 1999Confirmed by Pneumo- coniosis Board of TMH Jamshedpur.203203203
BYSSINO-SIS1987Factory Dir., Orissa & ESI Scheme.20831NIL
  - do -297NILNIL
ASBESTO- SIS1987- do -1161NIL
MERCURY POISONING1992 to 1993Factory Dir., Orissa & RLI, Kolkata1051059

The Medical Cell of Directorate of Factories, Government of Orissa undertook projects to assess the occupational hazards associated with handling, storage and use of hazardous chemicals.

Table- I shows the details of the examinations carried out on workers employed in dangerous operation (Under Section 87 of the Factories Act, 1948) and in other hazardous processes during the last 5 years.

Table – I

Medical Examination of workers employed in dangerous operation and hazardous processes during the period 1997 to 2001.

Description of the operation or process19981999200020012002
(a) Manufacture, treatment or handling of lead alloy & certain compounds of lead & printing press.---3212
(b) Handling of coal in Thermal Power Plant831178319618882867
(c) Asbestos Process--301-298
(d) Manganese Process18519015011560
(e) Dangerous Pesticides18621026172
(f) Others1532715666215652526320173
Total :1761316996253142735923482

6.2. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY EXAMINATION

Table-2. shows the details relating to the examinations carried out in 2000, 2001 & 2002 on workers of different factories subjected to pathological & radiological examination of occupational diseases

TABLE – 2

Clinical & Laboratory Examinations of workers during 2000 , 2001 & 2002
Sr.No.Nature of Laboratory Examination200020012002
1Pathological
(i) Blood
(ii)Urine
(iii)Stool
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2Radiological (X-Ray)-301-
3Physiological :
(i) Lung Function Test
(ii)Sputum Test
(iii)Liver Function Test
301
-
298
-
-
-
-
-
-
4Audiometry---
5Occupational Diseases Suspected;---
6Occupational Diseases detected165-
7No. of workers declared unfit for further work---
8Others ( Clinical Exam. )250132705823184

6.3. OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES - STATUS

TABLE – 3

Occupational Diseases Cases
Sr.No.Occupational DiseasesNo of Cases
200020012002
1Silicosis32NIL
2Silico TB---
3Talcosis---
4Byssinosis---
5Asbestosis---
6Jute Byssinosis---
7Other Pneumoconiosis133NIL
Total163NIL

6.4. DETECTION AND COMPENSATION FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE

TABLE – 4

Occupational Disease cases detected and compensated by Special Medical Board in year 2000, 2001 & 2002
Occupational DiseaseNo of Cases
200020012002
(a) Asbestosis---
(b) Byssinosis---
(c ) Silicosis32NIL
(d) Others133NIL
Total165NIL

6.5. OCCUPATIONAL STUDY, SURVEY & AUDIT CONDUCTED BY REGIONAL LABOUR INSTITUTE, KOLKATA IN THE STATE OF ORISSA

Regional Labour Institute, Govt. of India, Ministry of Labour, Kolkata undertook some Occupational Health Study, Survey as well as Occupational Health Audit as a part of Occupational Safety and Health Audit since last few years in the State of Orissa. Table – 5 shows total Occupational Health study, Survey and Audit conducted by the Industrial Medicine Division, Regional Labour Institute, Kolkata in the state of Orissa & Table – 6 shows the industry wise distribution of workers examined in each year.

TABLE – 5

Occupational Health Study, Survey Audit conducted by RLI, Kolkata
NameTotal Number
199819992000200120022003
Occupational Health Survey--1--1
Occupational Health Study2-1---
Occupational Health Audit (as a part of OSH Audit-----1
Total2-2--2

TABLE – 6

Workers examined
Industry1998199920002001
Fertilizer Industry--33-
Pesticide Industry29---
Coal Dust Plant Other Industries.--61-
Total29-94-

6.6. IDENTIFICATION OF OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES BY THE INSTITUTE

Table-7 shows the details of the examinations carried out since 1998 on workers of different factories by the Regional Labour Institute, Kolkata subjected to pathological, Radiological etc. examinations for investigation of occupational diseases. But no Occupational disease was detected.

TABLE - 7

Clinical & Laboratory examination of workers conducted by RLI, Kolkata
Sr.No.Name of the examinations1998199920002001
1Pathological
(a) Blood
(b) Urine
29
29
-
-
-
61
-
-
2Biochemical
(a) Blood
(b) Cholinesterase
29 - - -
3Radiological (X-Ray)29-61-
4Physiological
(a) Lung Function Test
(b) E.C.G.
29
29
-
-
61
61
-
-

6.7. ESI CORPORATION : ORISSA

Employees’ State Insurance Scheme of India is an integrated social security scheme tailored to provide social protection to workers and their dependants in contingencies, such as, sickness, maternity and death or disablement due to an employment injury or occupational hazard.

The ESI Act, (1948) applies to following categories of factories and establishments in the implemented areas :-

  • Non-seasonal factories using power and employing ten(10) or more persons
  • Non-seasonal and non power using factories and establishments employing twenty (20) or more persons.

The "appropriate Government" State or Central is empowered to extend the provisions of the ESI Act to various >

ESI Hospital in Orissa
Sl. NoPlace/AddressTel. No.
1.BRAJRAJNAGAR
Medical Supdt.
ESI Hospital, At/Po. Brajrajnagar
JHARSUGUDA
42033 (O)
42516 (R)
2.CHOUDWAR
Medical Supdt.
ESI Hospital
At. Choudwar, PO Charbatia.
CUTTACK
692341(O)
692339(R)
3.JAYKAYPUR
Medical Supdt.
ESI Hospital, RAYGADA
42765(O)
42675(R)
4.KANSBAHAL
Medical Supdt.
ESI Hospital
AT/PO Kansbahal
SUNDERGARH
38233(O)
38237(R)
5.BHUBANESWAR
Medical Supdt.
ESI Hospital
Near Hotel Oberoi
Nayapalli, Bhubaneswar
KHURDA
556419(O)
553374(R)

6.8. ESI HOSPITAL-CUM-ODC, JOKA

As per policy decisions of the Corporation taken on 8.12.88 and 24.2.93, the ESI Corporation has set up five zonal Occupational Disease Centre with a view to providing facilities for early detection and diagnosis of Occupational Diseases among ESI beneficiaries. This Zonal Occupational Disease Centre cater to the needs of ESI beneficiaries of the neighboring States also. The suspected cases of Occupational Diseases are referred to this Centre by the States concerned. The Zonal Occupational Disease Centre for Eastern India is situated at Kolkata.

The ESI Hospital-cum-ODC situated at Joka, Kolkata is the only OD Centre/Hospital being run by ESI Corporation directly in the Eastern States of India. The Hospital was commissioned with effect from 1.10.1994 for the benefit of IPs of Orissa as also for the IPs scattered in various States of Eastern Zone to cater to the treatment for occupational disease. The Hospital is a referral hospital in nature and normally caters to specialist treatment. It is a 300 bedded hospital, which includes 250 general beds and 50 beds for ODC. This hospital has been taken over w.e.f. 1.2.94. The OPD started on 1.10.94. Indoor and ODC started w.e.f. 23.6.95.

Local Office in Orissa
Sl. NoPlace/AddressTel. No.
1.BHUBANESWAR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
Plot No. A/22 near railway level crossing
BHUBANESWAR
510417
2.BARIPADA
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
Dipusahi, Station Road
PO.Baripada
DIST. MAYURBHANJ
-
3.BARBIL
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At. Junior Guest house
P.O. Matkambeda, Barbil
DIST. KEONJHAR-758 036
-
4.BARGARH
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
H/No. Dr. P.K.Das
Khajur Tikra
Near George high School
BARGARH
-
5.BRAJRAJNAGAR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
Brajrajnagar, Hospital Chhak
DIST. JHARSUGUDA
-
6.BALASORE
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At/P.O. Nalia Bag
DIST. BALASORE
63324
7.BERHAMPUR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
2nd Lane, Anant Nagar, Berhampur
DIST. GANJA(ORISSA)
-
8.CHOWDWAR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
ESIC Complex, P.O. Charbatia
(Choudwar)
DIST. CUTTACK
692452
9.BHANANDAL
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. B.Jena
Chandikhol Chhak
P.O. Sunguda
Dhanmandal
DIST. JAJPUR
-
10.GOVINDPUR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. B.K. Pattnaik
At. Meena Bazar
Jaganath Road
PO/Dt. DHENKANAL.
34160
11.HIRAKUD
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At/PO Hirakud
DIST. SABALPUR
-
12.JHARSUGUDA
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. A.K. Singh
K.M. Road
DIST. JHARSUGUDA
62857
13.JAYKAYPUR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At/PO J.K. Pur, (Rayagada)
DIST. KORAPUT
-
14.JAJPUR ROAD
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
Natapada, Jajpur Road
JAJPUR
-
15.KHURDA
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. A.K. Pattanaik, Adv.
P.O. Lane, New bus stand
Khurda,
DIST. PURI
-
16.KANSBAHAL
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At. Central Colony
P.O. Kansbahaal,
DIST. SUDERGARH
-
17.KALYANI NAGAR CUTTACK
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
Kalyani nagar, Indu Nivas,
Kalyani Nagar,
CUTTACK
644484
18.PARADEEP
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. H.K. Tripathi,
At/PO Kujanga
DIST. JAGATSINGHPUR
-
19.SAMANT SAHI CUTTACK
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Sh. A.K. Biswal
At. Samanta Sahi
Near Akhandalamani Temple
P.O. Buxi Bazar
CUTTACK
621234
20.ROURKELA
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
MM-16
Rourkela-4
DIST. SUNDERGARH
503958
21.RAJGANGPUR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
At/Po Rajgangpur
DIST SUNDERGARH
20359
22.SONEPUR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
House of Ganeshwar Sahoobad
Bazar (Bhagabti Plot)
P.O. Sonepur Raj
SONEPUR
-
23.T.P.M. AREA CHOUDWAR
Manager, Local Office,
ESI Corporation,
T.P. Mills Area
At/Po. Kapaleswar
Choudwar,
DIST. CUTTACK
 

6.9. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE CELL

The industrial hygiene division is devoted to anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of environment factors or stresses arising in or from the work places inside factories to which the workers are exposed.

The cell undertakes “Safety and Occupational Health Surveys” in factories all over the state as per the provisions of section 91A of the factories Act 1948. The cells equipped with the various sampling instruments, direct reading equipments and analytical instruments for evaluation of various stress factors in the work environment.

The industrial hygiene cell conducted survey in work environment of different factories for assessment of levels of air borne concentration of the following toxic hazardous dust.

1Coal1 No
2Iron ore1 No
3Mixed dust1 No
4Ceramic dust1 No

FIRE AND EXPLOSION RISK SURVEY CONDUCTED DURING THE YEAR

Survey in respect of fire and explosion risk was carried out in 4 factories.

  • M/s. Bharat Petroleum, Cuttack depot
  • M/s. LPG, Bottling plant of BPCL, Kurda
  • M/s. LPG Bottling plant of HPCL, Jatni
  • M/s. Indian Oil depot, Jatni

Management of occupational safety and health at unit level

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT UNIT LEVEL

This Chapter deals with the management of Occupational Safety and Health at unit level i.e. manufacturing units. The state has total number of 2827 registered manufacturing units, the breakup of which according to factories registered under section 2(m)(i), 2(m)(ii), and section 85 of the Factories Act, 1948 is given below.

Number of registered factories
Category of factories19981999200020012002
Factories under Section 2(m)(i) (Manufacturing Process with power employing 10 or more workers).22152238233124622400
Factories under Section 2(m)(ii) (Manufacturing process without power employing 20 or more workers)869710411491
Factories notified under Section 85176176177182336
Total24772511261227582827

In order to have a fair idea, about the safety and health status in these units, the following aspects on safety and health have been covered under the chapter:-

  • 7.1 Safety Policy
  • 7.2 Appointment of safety officers
  • 7.3 Safety Committee
  • 7.4 Occupational Health Center
  • 7.5 Welfare
  • 7.6 On-site emergency plans
  • 7.7 Safety reports
  • 7.8 Safety audit.

There are some statutory requirements as provided under the Factories Act, 1948 and Rules framed there under, for each of the aspects stated above. Items 7.6 to 7.7 are additional requirements exclusively applicable to MAH installations which are covered by separate set of rules. Each of the aspect with its status has been discussed in the following paragraph.

7.1. SAFETY POLICY

Under the provisions of sections 7A(3), 41-B(2) and 112 of the Factories Act 1948 requires preparation of a written statement of policy in respect of health and safety of workers at work by the factories meeting of the following criteria:-

  • Units covered under Section 2(m) (i) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.
  • Units covered under section 2(m) (ii) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 100 workers.
  • Units covered under Section 87 of Factories Act, 1948.
  • Units covered under section 2(cb) of the Factories Act, 1948.

In addition to the above, the Chief Inspector may require the occupier of any of the factories of class or description of factories to comply with the above requirements of Safety Policy if in his opinion it is expedient to do so.

As per the details available 117 units required preparation of Safety Policy, however, 96 units have only prepared the safety policy, which is about 82% of the total.

7.2 APPOINTMENT OF SAFETY OFFICERS

As per the provisions of Section 40B of the Factories Act, 1948, Safety Officer is required to be appointed for the units meeting the following criteria:

7.2.1. Units employing more than 1000 workers wherein any manufacturing process or operation is carried on involving any risk of bodily injury, poisoning or diseases or any hazard to health. As per the details available 123 Safety Officers were required to be appointed as against 98 Safety Officers were appointed in various factories in the State. The employment positions of Safety Officer in the state are given below.

YEARNo of factories notified for employment of safety officerNo. of safety officers requiredNo. of safety officers actually employed
19895410986
19995310886
200055131103
20015012398
20025111991
7.3. SAFETY COMMITTEE

Under the provision of Section 41 and 41G of the Factories Act, 1948 require constitution of Safety Committee in the factories meeting the following criteria:-

  • Units employing 250 or more workers
  • Units covered under Section 87 of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.
  • Units the covered under Section 2(cb) of the Factories Act, 1948 and employing more than 50 workers.

116 units required constitution of Safety Committee as per the information available. However, only 104 units have constituted safety Committees.

7.4 MEDICAL FACILITIES

54 industries have appointed full time Medical Officers and 18 industries have appointed part time Medical Officers. 45 industries are provided ambulance van and 43 industries are provided ambulance room.

Medical examination of workers employed in dangerous operations and hazardous processes are given below during the year 1998-2002.

MEDICAL EXAMINATION

Sl. No.Description of the operation or process19981999200020012002
a)Manufacture, treatment or handling of lead alloy and certain compound of lead and printing pres---3212
b)Handling of coal in thermal power plant831178319618882867
c)Asbestos process--301-298
d)Manganese process1859015011560
e)Dangerous pesticides18621026172
f)Others15327156661836423508210173
 Total1561316996221232560423482

Clinical and laboratory examination

Sl. No.Nature of laboratory examination200020012002
1.Pathological---
2.Radiological (x-ray)---
3.Physiological   
 Lung function test301-298
4.Audiometry---
5.Occupational diseases suspected---
6.Occupational diseases detected---
7.Number of workers declared unfit for further work---
8.Others (clinical)217962529823482
7.5 WELFARE

For the welfare of workers employed in factories Chapter V of the Factories Act, 1948, and the Orissa Factories Rules, 1958 the following welfare measures are required..

  • Washing facilities
  • Facilities for storing and drying cloths
  • Facilities for sitting
  • First aid appliances
  • Shelters, rest room and lunch room (if more than 150 workers are ordinarily employed)
  • Canteen (if more than 250 workers are ordinarily employed)
  • Crèche (if more than 300 women workers are ordinarily employed)
  • Ambulance room (if more than 500 workers are ordinarily employed).
  • Welfare officers (if more than 500 workers are ordinarily employed).
7.5.2 EMPLOYMENT OF WELFARE OFFICERS IN FACTORIES

57 factories required deployment of 93 Welfare Officers. Of them 56 factories employed 107 Welfare Officers.

7.5.3. Canteens, Shelters, Rest Rooms and Crèches
YearCanteenShelter, Rest Room,Crèche
 Factories RequiringFactories HavingFactories RequiringFactories HavingFactories RequiringFactories Having
200193901161143927
7.5.3. ONSITE EMERGENCY PLAN

Section 41B(4) of the Factories Act 1948 requires that Every occupier shall, with the approval of the Chief Inspector, draw up an on-site emergency plan and detailed disaster control measures for his factory and make known to the workers employed therein and to the general public living in the vicinity of the factory the safety measures required to be taken in the event of an accident taking place.

As per the information available 19 Nos. of MAH installations are required to prepare the on-site emergency plan. 19 MAH installations have prepared the plans and submitted to the Director of Factories.

7.5.4 SAFETY REPORTS

As per the provision of rule 10 of “The Control of Major Industrial Accident Hazard Rules, 1989” it is mandatory for an occupier to prepare and submit to the Chief Inspector before the commencement of an industrial activity the Safety Report of the industrial activity to which these rules apply. The Safety Report is to be submitted in prescribed format. Further, it is advisable that all the units after the commencement of the industrial activity shall carry out an independent Safety Audit of the respective industrial activities with the help of an expert not associated with such industrial activities. This will help the management to know the weak points in their system and to take suitable>

7.5.5. HAZOP Study & RISK ASSESSMENT STUDIES

The HAZOP study (Hazard and operability studies ) are carried out in advance on any plant to examine the process or at least the relevant parts of the process to discover how deviation from the intention of design can occur and to decide whether such deviations can give rise to hazardous conditions.

The technique aims to simulate the imagination in a systematic way and is useful to identifying potential hazards in advance and allows the user to take corrective measures.

The information in respect of the number of industries conducted risk analysis and HAZOP Study is not available with the Directorate of Factories.

7.5.6. SAFETY AUDIT

Out of the 33 MAH installations in the State require to conduct Safety Audit by external agency. Only 8 MAHC units have submitted external Safety Audit Report along with recommendations. Compliance to this effect is not satisfactory. Therefore, industries may be encouraged to conducting Safety Audit by external agency.

7.5.7 PROSECUTION AND CONVICTIONS UNDER SECTION 92 OF THE FACTORIES ACT.

920 cases were pending from the previous year (2000). 66 new cases have been launched during the year 2001 and 14 cases were decided.

Management of occupational safety and health at state level

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT STATE LEVEL

The management system of OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH at the STATE LEVEL may be broadly grouped as under for our discussion purpose of this report..

  • Legislative Activities
  • Government Departments-Central
  • Government Departments-State
  • Other Organizations

1. Legislative Activities : Administration and enforcement of Occupational Safety, Health and Welfare is primarily vested with the State Government because the instruments like policies, legislation etc. are required to be more comprehensive to take care of safety and health issues at State Level in order to fulfill the aspirations of the State and related needs.. Apart from the Factories Act 1948, there are much other legislations dealing with better work environment, safety, health and welfare facilities.

These act grants OSH authorities, among other things, (a) to promulgate, modify and revoke safety and health standards, (b) to conduct inspections and investigations and to issue citations including proposed penalties (c) to require employees to keep records of safety and health data (d) to petition the courts to restrain imminent danger situations and (e) to approve or reject state plans for programme under the act.

The safety and health at workplace is governed by various statutes in the state depending on the nature of workplace, manufacturing activity and specific aspect of safety and health. Some of the important statutes / Legislations are given below:

  • The Factories Act, 1948 and the Rules framed there under (The Orissa Factories Rules),
  • Indian Boilers Act 1923 and Rules framed there under.
  • The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation Act, )1986 and the Rules made there under
  • The Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989.
  • Dock Workers’ Safety, Health and Welfare Regulation.
  • Indian Electricity Act and Rules Framed there under.
  • Dangerous machines (Regulations) Act.
  • Indian Explosive Act.
  • The petroleum Act and Rules.
  • Static and Mobile Pressure Vessels Rules.

There are different departments of Central Government and State Government entrusted with the responsibility of enforcement of these statutes. The other organization such as training and research institution, employers associations, employee’s organization etc. also supplementing the efforts of enforcement agencies in promoting occupational safety and health in the state directly or indirectly. A combined (indicative) list of such agencies is given below with whom this institute initiated correspondence to obtain their views etc as a part of compilation of this report.

  • The Station Director,All India Radio,Cuttack, Orissa
  • The Director,Indian Standard Institution.Plot No 62 / 3 ,Ganga Nagar,Bhubaneshwar, Orissa
  • The officer in Charge,Central Integrated Pest Management Centre,Plot NO N/4,F/39,I R C Village, Nayapalli,Bhubhaneshwar—751 015, Orissa.
  • The Secretary ,State Council for Child Welfare,Qrs. No VI , M R-II , Unit VI Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa
  • The Director ,Department of Textiles Satya Nagar, Bhubhaneshvar P. O. ,Orissa
  • The Director of Industries,A / 1 , OPSC Compound,Cuttack, Orissa
  • The Director of Medical Education & Training, Bhubhaneshwar & P .O Orissa
  • The Director ,Regional Medical Research Centre,Chandrasekhrapur, Bhubhaneshwar & P .O Orissa State. Pin –751 016
  • The Relief Commissioner(Special Relief),Government of Orissa, Revenue Department,Bhubhaneshwar P. O.Orissa State
  • The Secretary ,State Commission for Women,Plot No 697, Shed Nagar,Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa
  • The Regional Information Officer,P I B, Old Secretariat Building, Cuttack,Orissa State
  • The Member Secretary,Orissa State Prevention and Control of Pollution Board,A/118, Nilakanta Nagar,Bhubhaneshwar-751 012 , Orissa
  • The Technical Director,National Informatics Centre, Sachivalaya,Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa
  • The Labour Commissioner,Labour & Employment Department,Bhubhaneshwar P. O.Orissa
  • The Information Officer, P I B ,Pandit J.N.Marg, Unit –IV,Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa
  • The Secretary,Khadi and Village Industries Board,Kharavela Nagar, Unit 3,Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa
  • The Director,Handicrafts and Cottage Industries,361, Shed Nagar, Bhubhaneshwar P. O. ,Pin : 513 484 Orissa
  • The Managing Director,Orissa Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation,IIDCO Towers, Janpath,Bhubhaneshwar –751 007, Orissa
  • The Managing Director,Industrial Development Corporation,Unit 2, Bhubhaneshwar, Orissa
  • The Managing Director,Industrial Promotion and Investment Corporation,IPICOL House, Janpath,Bhubhaneshwar, OrissaPin code : 751 007
  • The Director,Economics and Statistics Department ,Unit V ,Bhubhaneshwar P. O. , Orissa.
  • The Director of Health Services,P.B.No 406 515, Bhubhaneshwar & P .OOrissa State.
  • The Director of Technical Education & Training,A / 1 , OPSC Compound,Cuttack, Orissa
  • The Chief Inspector of factories,Government of Orissa, Kharvel Nagar, Unit III,Bhubaneshwar- 751 001.
  • The Dean (Research)Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology,Bhubhaneshwar—751 015, Orissa
  • The Station Director,Doordarshan Kendra,Bhubaneshwar , Orissa
  • The Director of Medical Education & Training,Bhubhaneshwar & P .OOrissa.
  • The Director of Industries,A / 1 , OPSC Compound,Cuttack, Orissa.
  • The Director ,Department of TextilesSatya Nagar, Bhubhaneshwar P. O. ,
  • The Director (Mines Safety )158, Saheed Nagar,Bhubhaneshwar & P .OPin –751 007, Orissa
  • The Director,National Productivity Council,A / 7 , Surya Nagar , Bhubaneshwar,Orissa.
  • The Director,Regional Research Institute,Bhubhaneshwar—751 013Orissa.
  • The officer in Charge,Central Integrated Pest Management Centre,Plot NO N/4,F/39,I R C Village,Nayapalli,Bhubhaneshwar—751 015, Orissa.
  • The Director,Indian Standard Institution.Plot No 62 / 3 ,Ganga Nagar,Bhubaneshwar, P. O., Orissa.

The next few pages deal with the activities of a few such organizations, which will help the readers to have brief information.

Multi Disciplinary Centre (MDC)

(a) INTRODUCTION

The Multidisciplinary Centre (MDC) on Safety, Health and Environment is Government of Orissa sponsored Autonomous Organisation in the State of Orissa and registered as a autonomous Institute under the Society Registration Act, 1860 w.e.f. 1.2.94. The Principal Secretary, Labour and Employment is the President who is assisted by an Executive Committee, which consists of experts from various related fields. This Centre is trying to provide professional expertise in the field of Safety, Health &Environment, leadership development, improved work culture, Labour laws, HRD to various factories, mines, unions etc. This Institute is identifying areas of contemporary importance and provides joint forum for employer, employee, and the Government. It also gets many sponsored programmes from Government departments with financial assistance.

(b) TRAINING COURSES / WORKSHOP/SEMINARS

The MDC is conducting the basic and advanced training on First Aid, recognized by Orissa Government and by the DGMS, Dhanbad. It had also organized 48 programmes till 2.8.03 in 22 places benefiting large number of participants/organizations. A few more programmes are in the immediate pipelines.

The MDC had organized 14 number of programmes in six places till April, 2003 .

(c) R & D ACTIVITIES

At present, there is no R & D activities in MDC. However, during 1995 this agency was entrusted to investigate the alleged report on Acid rains in Joda area Keonjhar District of Orissa.

(d) PUBLICATIONS

The MDC has so far published about 18 publications/proceedings volumes, which are very useful compilations. A few more publications are in the pipelines.

(e) DEVELOPMENT OF SAFETY AND HEALTH IN THE STATE OF ORISSA

The MDC is of the opinion that:

Most of the industries in Orissa do not have organized occupational health system.

  • Safety Management needs more emphasis.
  • Infrastructure support not sufficient.
  • Training and education activities need to be carried on continued basis.
2 Rourkela Steel Plant (RSP) -Steel Authority of India Ltd.,

RASP is continuously trying to achieve new heights of excellence of OSH through voluntary and sustainable Safety culture. Joint participation is maintained through apex Central Safety Committee and Departmental Safety Committees. The top management organizes large scale mass communication meeting to bridge the gap between employees with a view to integrate safety and productivity.

It is also having a practice of taking care of OSH component from recruitment to retirement. Preventive man maintenance programme for early detection and treatment is in position. The Industrial Hygiene Unit is taking care of work environment aspects to make the environment more humane. Biological monitoring like carboxy haemoglobin, methaemoglobine and carbon monoxide level in the breath zone of smokers are done. RSP is having a Museum for the benefit of all section of employees. Rehabilitation Units provides physiotherapy inside plant premises. All health and hygiene data are computerized in health Information System (HIS). Two scientific papers have received “Best paper” award and one “second Best paper” at Steel Medical Officer’s Conference. OHS-RSP has received “Best Occupational Health care” award for 2001 from Government of Orissa.

2. TRAINING/SEMINAR/WORKSHOP

During the last six years the number of average executives and non executives trained on Safety aspects stands at 85 and 5498 respectively. Similarly OSH & HRD centers trained 162 executives and 803 non executives on average basis during last five years. OSH department also conducted 5 seminars during the period.

3. R & D ACTIVITIES

Though no specific R & D activity has been undertaken by RASP, the following are a few of the improvements made in process / equipments / layout etc. which has resulted into improved safety status in the areas /subjects like;

Prevent fall of hot spots to reduce bone injuries in melting shop.

Prevent exposures to direct heat radiation and burn injuries in ladle heating furnace.

Prevent fall of iron jams from a height of 41 mtrs. to avoid fatal injury by relocation of lance stand.

Additional accident monitoring system has been developed in LD Gas Holders to prevent explosion and gas leakage.

Additional fire fighting system has been developed in Tar Distillation Plant to extinguish fire during emergency in an efficient manner.

The OHS center also had conducted six in-house studies during last five years based on which the following are the few improvements made;

Noise exposure and ammonia exposure has been reduced in the Compressors house.

Dust concentration in ambient air in coal unloading area, and Sintering Plant area has been reduced.

Day light illumination in Rolling Mills and Special Plate Plant has been improved.

CO level in GCP area of Blast Furnace Department has been reduced.

Pitch vapor in working environment in coal chemical department has been reduced.

4. DETAILS OF IN-HOUSE PUBLICATION ON SAFETY

The following are being published which have direct relevant for improvement of safety and health.

  • Monthly safety bulletins.
  • Quarterly safety bulletins. (Suraksha Barta)
  • Sahayag –monthly publication.
  • Telecast of safety messages through RSP TV network.
  • OHS digest – quarterly in three languages.
  • Telecast of discussion on health topics in RSP cable network.
  • SHE SCAN – published by SAIL Safety Organization.
5. SAFETY AWARDS WON BY RSP TILL LAST 5 YEARS
  • Steel Minister’s Trophy for best Safety Performance.
  • Ispat Suraksha Puraskar for Maximum reduction in accident rate in iron and Steel Zone and Maintenance and Services Zone (5 times).
  • Best performance Award in Safety Health and Environment Management from Govt. of Orissa.
  • Ispat Suraksha Puraskar for Longest Accident Free Period.
  • Chairman Silver Plaque (SAIL) for No Fatal Accident to Contractor Employees (2 times).
6. VIEWS OF RSP FOR IMPROVING SAFETY STATUS IN THE STATE OF ORISSA.

RSP feels that being an important pioneer industry, it shall be considered as a nodal center for consultancy in the field of safety.

RSP desires that a consolidated safety status of Orissa, in a website be operated by the CIF, Orissa.

RSP also desires that a team from inter-industry group may be formed to conduct safety audit of industries.

LOSS PREVENTION ASSOCIATION OF INDIA LTD., (LPA)

Introduction:

Loss Prevention Association of India Ltd., is a non profit organization engaged in promoting safety and loss control through education, training and consultancy. LPA is having its branch offices at New Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad and Kochi with its Headquarters operating from Mumbai. The Kolkata Branch is serving the need of Orissa state. LPA employs a-team of professionals from various technological fields to carry out its activities. Many of the services offered by LPA can be availed by its associate members only.

Training/seminars/workshops

LPA has developed many training programmes with a primary objective to train personnel in industry and commerce on various aspects of safety and loss prevention. The training programmes are designed for supervisory and managerial personnel to equip them with skills for discovering and eliminating causes of accidents. The training programmes and seminars are generally focused on fire safety, material movement, road safety and industrial safety. They also provide wide range of consultancy, advisory and risk management services for various occupancies like Banks, Commercial Office Premises, Wire Houses, Chemical Industries, Ship Building, Textile Industry, Engineering Industry, Pharmaceutical Industry, Power Plant, Paper Industry etc.

RESEARCH AND DESIGN ACTIVITIES

No basic research and design activities are carried out.

IMPROVEMENT ON DESIGN, LAYOUT ETC.

No specific improvements are reported.

IN HOUSE PUBLICATIONS

LPA regularly disseminate information through its quarterly journal – Loss Prevention News and Road Safety Digest. LPA is having Library cum Information Centre function at Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad, Kochi, New Delhi and Mumbai. The State of Orissa is yet to get such an Information Centre. LPA has already brought out about 50 publications on various aspects of fire prevention, safety in material handling and road safety. Many posters are also brought out to create safety awareness at the work place. The Association has produced about 15 films of videocassettes, which includes fire prevention, industrial safety, road safety, home safety and child safety in English as well as Hindi.

SERVICES RENDERED BY THE DISTRICT INDUSTRIES CENTERS:

There are 17 DICs and 14 Branch DICs functioning in the State for promotion of industries in the State. The objectives of the DICs are listed as below.

  • To identify prospective entrepreneur for viable project.
  • To identify viable projects and make demand survey on the available resources of the district and to plan for promotion of viable industries in the area.
  • To grant Preliminary Registration Certificate (PRC) and Permanent Registration Certificate (PMT) to the entrepreneurs
  • To prepare viable and feasible project reports.
  • To strengthen the guidance cell to solve the problems of the entrepreneurs.
  • To maintain up to date data on SSI Sector
  • To recommend financial proposals to Orissa State Financial Corporation/Financial Institutions/Banks etc
  • To allot Govt. land /shed in Industrial Estates
  • To recommend for power connection.
  • To arrange EDP training.
  • To arrange exhibition, fair and publicity and visit of industrialists to Trade Fairs and different Industrial Estates of other States
  • To solve the problems of the industrial units at the district level .
  • To monitor the health of existing SSI units and the progress of those in the pipe line.
  • To recommend different incentives as per the industrial policy of the State Govt.
  • To provide necessary marketing assistance.
  • To monitor the implementation of the Prime Minister's Rozgar Yojana.
  • To monitor the implementation of the Prime Minister's Rozgar Yojana
  • To assist revival of sick SSI Units.
  • To up date the library in different DICs by procuring different hand books relating to industries.

This department is open to comprehensive criticism and accepting valuable suggestions from all concerned. This is evident from the fact that the department invites such items directly to their mail

5. THRUST AREAS in the State of Orissa for the Industrial Development:

The Govt. of Orissa has identified as many as 13 broad categories of Industries and declared as Thrust areas as incorporated in the Govt. of Orissa I.P 1996 which is in operation since 1st Mar, 1996. In the said I.P under clause-5, the Govt. has emphasized for promotion of different industries as mentioned below in 13 different areas.

1. To promote mineral based industries.

  • Reputed private parties including multinational will be involved in exploration of Gold, Diamond bearing areas .
  • With the help of Central Govt. exploration of mineral oil and gas in Mohanadi basin and off shore
  • The State is pioneer in Aero-magnetic survey and modern methods of exploration like remote sensing, aero-magnetic survey and other methods would be adopted to build up the resource inventory of various minerals in the State.
  • Efforts will be made for processing Ores (Washing, Crushing, Sizing and beneficiation etc.) Inside the State for value addition to provide greater employment and generate greater tax resources.
  • Efforts will also be made to set up manufacturing industries based on minerals inside the State. For this purpose processing /manufacturing industries would be given preference for supply of minerals on long term arrangement.

The Orissa Mining Corporation has large plan for joint venture mining/processing projects relating to Iron-Ore, Chromite, Gold, Diamond and tin etc. To encourage independent power producers both Indian and foreigners, new power plant would be prevailed upon to adopt modern technology for utilization of Fly-Ash, curbing pollution and investing in local and peripheral development activities.

2. To promote Granite based Industries.

3. To promote Gemstone cutting and polishing unit.

A sophisticated Gemstone laboratory has been set up at Bhubaneshwar.

4. To promote Agro & Food processing Industries.

  • Appropriate linkages would be established in the form of post harvest storage facilities, cold storage, processing facilities etc. Processing facilities, would be encouraged in private sector for fruits, vegetable> oil seeds, cotton, sugar cane etc. Soya bean sunflower, Oil palm, rubber, tea/coffee, spices would be promoted with appropriate linkages for processing. Quality seed production in private sector would be promoted in a big way. Privatization of Govt. agricultural farms to act as nuclei for production of high quality seeds for hi-tech agriculture and dissemination of advanced technology to farmers.
  • Private efforts for development of agriculture, Horticulture , plantation crops etc. will be encouraged through contract farming.
  • Greenhouse horticulture /floriculture would be promoted in private sector.
  • Sericulture will be encouraged in private sector.
  • Tissue-culture and techniques of advanced bio-technology will be promoted in a big way.
  • Industries using agro-residue as raw material will also be encouraged.
  • Efforts will be made for development of sugar cane and cotton with active participation of sugar mills and spinning mills in different parts of the State.
  • To promote brackish water and fresh water prawn culture keeping to prevent encroachments/ pollution/disease spread.
  • Modern hatcheries and feed plants would be promoted and to develop inland pisi-culture through advance technology of high yielding fish production.
  • To encourage agro and food processing industries and to provide need based support to develop poultry sector.
  • To promote commercial plantation in areas like Rubber, Tea & Coffee.

5. To encourage Electronics and Software Industries.

I. An Electronics hardware park and a software park has been established at Bhubaneswar. Steps are being taken to attract industries from all over the Country to these parks.

II. The State Electronics Development Corporation(SEDC) is the nodal agency for development of electronics hardware industries and software industries in the State. Orissa Computer Application Centre (OCAC) will be responsible for system development in Govt. and Govt. agencies promoting computerization in Govt. sector and training of man power.

6. To promote Petroleum Refinery and Petro-Chemicals:

7. To promote Pharmaceutical Industries.

8. To promote Automobile and Automobile components.

9. To promote Garment and Hosiery Knit-wear.

10. To encourage export oriented industries.

11. To develop and establish Tourism industries.

12. To encourage Ancillary and Auxiliary industries.

13. To encourage Handicraft, Handloom, Khadi and Village Industries in the State.

The priority industries means industrial units in the following specific categories and having a project cost not less than Rs.1.00 crore to be encouraged in the State .

  • Electronics/Telecommunication(Hardware and software).
  • Agro and Food Processing.
  • Aluminium based Industries .
  • Garment, Hosiery and Knit-wear.
  • Synthetic Yarn Spinning & Weaving Mills.
  • Gem and Jewellery.
  • Industries manufacturing leather goods.
  • Industries manufacturing equipment and products relating to generation and/or use of non-conventional energy and relating to pollution control.
  • Precision Engineering.
  • Automobile and Automatic Components.
  • Basic Drugs and Pharmaceuticals.
  • Petrochemicals.
  • Fly-Ash based industries utilizing a minimum of 25% by weight of fly ash as base raw material.
  • 100% export oriented industries.
  • Ship breaking.
  • Stainless Steel downstream industries. Provided that the requirement of minimum project costs of Rs.1.00 crore shall not apply in respect of Electronics/ Tele-communication (Hardware and software) industrial units.

Resources available and needed

RESOURCES AVAILABLE AND NEEDED FOR MANAGEMENT OF OSH

During the study, the team visited departments and organizations dealing with occupational safety and health in the manufacturing sector with a view to establish inventory of occupational safety and health information in the state of West Bengal. The activities of the departments, resources available at their disposal were examined to determine the problems faced by the organizations in the matters of occupational safety and health and further resources needed in order to effectively manage occupational safety and health at the state level.

The scope of the study was limited to cover the organizations connected with safety and health at the state level. Occupational safety and health management at the unit level in the factories covered under the Factories Act was limited only to the information available in the annual returns and accident forms. Detailed analysis in the areas related to functioning of Safety Committees, Site appraisal Committee, details of safety reports, crèches, etc. as per the provisions of the Factories Act in each of the units was not undertaken as it was outside the defined scope of this study. In order to identify these problems, the more elaborate in-depth study is required to be taken up to get comprehensive information on management of occupational safety and health at unit level

The findings and recommendations as brought out by the study are summarized below:

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. In the State, there are 2491 factories registered under Section 2(m) of the Factories Act. In addition 336 factories are notified under Section 85, which are essentially employing less than 10/20 workers. Nearly 80% of the factories have submitted annual returns, half yearly returns etc. as per section 110 of Factories Act and Orissa Factories Rules. As the Annual Returns contains basic information such as employment, man hours employed, accidents, man-hours lost due to accidents, provision of welfare facilities, appointment of welfare officers and safety officers, occupational health facilities, etc. which are essential for compilation of state level data on occupational safety and health it is desirable that submission of Annual Returns should be insisted upon from all the factories.

It is recommended that efforts should be made to ensure compliance with the requirement of submission of annual returns in prescribed format by registered factories. It is also recommended that the occupier/manager of the factories should be made to submit complete details in the annual returns. Noncompliance with such provisions can be brought to the notice of the occupier by issuing notice by the inspecting officials.

2. 20 Nos. of fatal accidents occurred during the year 2001. Of them 5 accidents occurred due to falling from height (Persons falling) and 7 of such accidents occurred in basic metal and alloy industries. Therefore, during the inspection of such factories care should be taken by the Factory Inspector to ensure that the workers are provided with suitable personal protective equipment while working at height.

3. Out of the total accidents (774 in 2001) in the state, 84 accidents occurred in Cotton industry, and 52 accidents occurred in Jute industry. Use of old machineries, lack of sophistication, improper maintenance, in adequate guarding of moving parts, absence of safe operating procedure, low level of awareness, lack of education and training, production target, poor machine maintenance, employment of non-qualified personnel for the works are the root causes of such accidents.

Occupiers should be asked to replace old machines which itself create hazards. All moving machineries should be adequately fenced and workers should be trained in safe operating procedure. Further, the occupiers may be directed to introduce some motivational scheme to promoting safety at work place. Specific hazards while working in the factories could be identified and the precautions to be taken could be disseminated through various modes such as training programmes, leaflets, booklets, lectures, etc.

4. Material handling; tools, implements, appliances used on the shop floor; machines and indoors, and unsafe work practices are the major agencies causing accidents.

It is therefore suggested that the occupiers/ managers of the factories should be advised on:

  • Design, maintenance and proper use of material handling equipment
  • Safe use of tools, appliances and equipment
  • Adequate guarding of machinery, and
  • Proper house keeping.

5. The analysis of accidents with respect to the location of injuries reveal that head, hands and foot are the body parts which are frequently injured in accidents. This indicates that proper protection of these body parts is not ensured at workplace. Therefore the occupiers should be advised to give appropriate personal protective equipment to their workers and make sure that they are used by workers while working in factories.

6. Pneumoconiosis is the most prevalent occupational diseases detected among the workers employed in factories. Out of 203 cases examined (1980-1999) by the Pneumoconiosis Board of TMH, Jamshedpur, 203 cases were confirmed. 153 Silicosis cases were detected by examining 2399 cases. Silicosis is caused due to prolonged exposure of worker to the silica dust. Therefore, workers employed for grinding operation and the process involving sand and free silica should be exposed to periodic medical examination.

7. As regards to preparation of safety policy, 117 factories were required to prepare safety policy. Of them 96 factories prepared safety policy. Therefore the level of compliance is not satisfactory. And 117 factories were required to constitute safety committees. Of them 104 factories constituted safety committee, the level of compliance with the provision is satisfactory. It is recommended that on the basis of the provisions of the Factories Act and the criteria laid down in Factories Rules, all units requiring preparation of safety policy and constitution of safety committee should be clearly identified. Thereafter, the compliance with these provisions should be improved through strict enforcement and inspection.

8. 170 factories were required to appoint qualified safety officer of them 142 factories appointed qualified safety officer. Therefore, it is not a satisfactory level of compliance as far as the appointment of safety officer in factories is concerned. However, the reports of accidents in Form 24, furnishing details of the accidents, causes of accidents and agencies involved therein, non use of personal protective equipment etc. indicate that the safety officers have not been effective in discharging their duties. It is therefore suggested that safety officers in all the factories should be trained and retrained through refresher courses on:

  • Technique of safety audit
  • Establishment of safety management system
  • Costing of accidents, and
  • Leadership for safety and health

9. It is also recommended that there should be better interaction between Factory Inspectors and Safety Officers through discussions on the ways and means for improving the safety, health and working conditions in their factories. This may lead to better status of safety and health management in factories

10. The provisions under the Factories Act and Rules provides for medical examination of workers employed in certain categories of factories by certifying surgeon. It is practically impossible to cover these factories only by a Medical inspector of factories employed in the Directorate of Factories and Boilers.

Therefore, it is suggested that on the lines of what is being done in other states such as Maharashtra, private Medical Practitioner could be appointed as certifying surgeon for particular areas, in order to conduct medical examination of workers and issue certificate of fitness as required under the Factories Act and the Rules.

11. Statistics regarding number of visits to factories by the Inspectors during 2001 reveals that 2277 factories notified under section 2(m) and 81 factories notified under section (85) were inspected by Inspector of Factories. Total no. of registered factories in Orissa during 2001 was 2758. Nearly 85% factories are inspected by the officers of the Directorate of Factories, therefore no of visits may be increased.

12. Almost all the factories in the state are employing labour on contract basis. The contract worker is to be provided adequate safety and health in the factory premises. It is often observed that the occupier/manager of the factory tend to ignore this responsibility. The office of the Labour Commissioner in the State enforces the Contract Labour Act. It is also seen that many contract workers try to ignore the safety aspects/instructions issued to them by the managements. In order to ensure that adequate attention given to safety, health and welfare by workers & by the occupiers, a programme for enforcement of safety and health provisions for the benefit of contract labour employed in the factory can be jointly undertaken by Directorate of Factories & Boilers and Office of the Labour Commissioner and trade unions. This programme can also include awareness improvement and training and education in the area of safety and health.

13. Department of Environment among other things is responsible for clearing industrial projects from environmental angle. There is a provision for Site Appraisal Committee under the under Section 41-A of the Factories Act. These two committees are having similar objectives i.e., clearing the location of industry from safety, health and environment angle. It is therefore suggested that these two committees should work in close coordination with each other in order to avoid duplication of efforts to facilitate faster clearance of industrial projects and to reduce the inconvenience to the industries and promote economic growth. These committees shall also invite experts from organizations like RLI etc.

14. There are thousands of small-scale industrial units in the state. These units are registered with Department of Industries. The licensing, development, training, marketing and financial aspects in respect of these units are looked after by different govt., semi govt. & non-govt. agencies.. However, they do not adequately cover the safety, health and welfare of workers. For this purpose, the training module developed by DGFASLI in collaboration with ILO could be used which is aimed not only to enhance productivity but also takes care of safety and health aspects like handling of hazardous chemicals, productive machine safety, material handling & storage lighting, ventilation. Layout, welfare measures etc. This module ensure the participation of both owners/managers and workers. Further, Institutions like IIT, lead banks, SFC, SIDBI ,SISI etc. are organization/conducting short term training programme in which the DGFASLI-ILO module shall be included to practice safety & health at root level. Simultaneously, these industries who show/demonstrate safety & health conscious may be awarded (by Ministry of Labour through DGFASLI) non-financial rewards. This will go a long way in retaining safety and health culture in SSI at national level. The appropriate authority may constitute an expert committee with DGFASLI as convener/chairman.

15. The Health Services in the State are provided through District general hospitals and ESI hospitals. These hospitals are mainly concentrating on diagnosis, prevention, control and treatment of the common diseases. However, ESI HOSPITAL has a system of diagnosis of Occupational diseases. In addition to this, the basic health care support is also given through:-

  • Medical college hospital.
  • Primary Health Centers
  • Private hospitals
  • Private Practioners.
  • Voluntary health organization.
  • C.G.H.S. dispensary etc.

None of the agencies has specialist knowledge on O. H. and the syllabus of MBBS course do not have basic module on O. H. Therefore, all doctors (both in govt. & Pvt.) MBBS students, nursing course students, nursing staff employed in industries are to be educated in a systematic and standard manner to install a root level mechanism to improve health aspects and to improve skill in early detection or diagnosis of occupational diseases and in recommending suitable> This will surely lead into improving sick free man-days and thereby directly contributing to more industrial production. Thereby the status of occupational health of the workers employed in factories will have a positive jump. Preparation of uniforms syllabus, training module may be entrusted to DGFASLI/RLI, Kolkatta

16. The programme on control of major hazard could be strengthened further. This programme should include effective formulation and use of mutual aid scheme and establishments of emergency response centers in various industrial pockets of the states. These centers can also take care of transport accidents involving chemicals.

17. The non-governmental organizations, various employers association in the state should also take up the activities in the field of safety and health on a large scale to ensure basic training course on safety and health for the following target groups through DGFASLI (RLI/CLI) & TTTI, State Labour Department (Who look after vocational training) for the teaching members of polytechnics and ITI in the state. This will help the prospective technical persons to be safety cultured leading to reduction of loss in the industrial economy.

18. In order to promote safety, health and welfare of workers employed in factories special training courses are organized for increasing the awareness level of union leaders in the field OSH through DGFASLI, RLI/CLI. The unit level union leaders should be able to function as faculty since workers will readily accept safety measures/techniques by union leaders. Therefore, the existing 3 days training programme module by RLI/CLI, shall be revised and an updated model for 3-4 weeks with hands on training sessions in industries required to be arranged. This is another method of involving the workers/unions in the management of OHS systems this can be readily taken up by the CLI/RLI who have ready expertise at present.

19. Central Board for Workers Education in collaboration with DGFASLI, Directorate of Factories & Boilers shall review programmes on safety and health for the workers.

20. For collecting the statistics, the information was not being compiled and sent to the Headquarters in time due to many reasons like shortage of time manpower etc. As a result the collected information could not be processed and the trends regarding various parameters on occupational safety and health could not be established. It is therefore suggested that all field level offices should be equipped with suitable> Close co-ordination between various statutory, non-statutory, other organizations who are connected with OSH requires to be monitored through Ministry of Labour preferably through DGFASLI who has network of field offices as well as expertise. This arrangement will also improve the communication among the offices leading to effective implementation of the orders issued under the provisions of the Factories Act and various other acts.

All the occupiers may be directed to send a copy of these statistics to all RLI (where computer and communication facilities are available) for quick compilation and analysis to feed the Ministry of Labour to enable them to take decisions at national and international levels.

21. All industries should have their own Safety Bench Marking standards including the Steel & Oil Industries.

22. Each Industry should establish one OSH (Occupational Safety and Health) information center equipped with computerized data bank on hazardous substances, major accident hazard installation and gas dispensation characteristics etc.

23. Industries in Orissa may consider for installation of OSHMS (Occupational Safety & Health Management System) for the industries as existing in other states i.e. West Bengal Goa, Karnataka etc.

24. Regular health check up of all employees should be carried out in all industries, especially the chemical/hazardous plants. However, periodicity may vary from industry to industry.

25. Regular training of Medicos and Para-Medicos including Nursing Students has become imperative.

26. Communication system to be strengthened to effectively monitor the disaster control measures.

27. Annual ‘Safety Audit’ and ‘Environment Audit’ should be conducted by external recognized agencies, particularly in the hazardous or hazard prone industries.

28. Computerization of Health data should be made mandatory for all organizations.

29. Chemical and poison information centers should be established in each industry/plant.

30. Plant Medical Officers of Hazardous Industries should get at least three months post graduate Certificate Course on “Occupational Health”.

31. All the First-aid boxes should contain DGFASLI’s First Aid leaflets along with other essential tools.

32. All the food-handlers should be tested annually with some essential pathological examination as per Orissa Factories Rules.

33. It is suggested that Chief Inspector Factories & Boilers should develop their own Industrial Hygiene Laboratory facilities; instruments available with the Directorate should be installed and used at a regular interval.

34. All hazardous industries should arrange for industrial hygiene study in respect of Work Environment Monitoring, Air Sampling, Analysis and Interpretation. Further, regular training programme should be arranged or employees may be sent to Regional Labour Institute, Kolkata/Central Labour Institute, Mumbai to attending programme on Industrial Hygiene.

Source of Information

SOURCE OF INFORMATION

  • Guidelines on Occupational safety and health management systems (ILO/OSH 2001) (Geneva, 2001).
  • Provisional Population Totals : India . Census of India 2001, Paper 1 of 2001).
  • Directorate of Economics & Statistics, Orissa, BBSR.
  • Directorate of Agriculture and Food Production, Orissa, BBSR.
  • Industrial Promotion and Investment Corporation of Orissa Ltd.
  • Directorate of Industries Orissa.
  • Multi-disciplinary Centre on Safety Health and Environment, Bhubaneswar (A Government of Orissa Sponsored Autonomous Organisation.
  • Orissa State Pollution Control Board.
  • Directorate of Factories and Boiler, Government of Orissa.
  • Study Reports : Regional Labour Institute, Kolkata
  • Proceeding of National Seminar on Management of Hazardous Chemical : Safety, Health & Environment – 2000.
  • Official Website of http://ori.nic.in/diorissa

  • Employees State Insurance Corporation & Official Website of Employees State Insurance Corporation http://www.esicindia.org/
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