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Introduction

INTRODUCTION

1.1 General Introduction

The technological advancements and development of complex and hazardous processes, the management of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) has become a vital issue. The threat of occupational hazards, particularly in the chemical and petrochemical industries is of great concern, specially, for the people who are responsible for policy planning and designing of instruments and other interventions for protecting the large workforce in the country. The major problem faced by the policy planners is the non-availability of timely information on vital areas such as occupational injuries and diseases, infrastructure available at the unit and the state level for taking up awareness, promotional and developmental programs.

The Directorate General Factory Advice Service and Labour Institutes (DGFASLI) is relied upon by Central and State Governments for a variety of information pertaining to occupational safety and health. At present the facilities available in our country do not allow as quick a response as is often needed. Further, substantial increase in the number of registered factories, introduction of sophisticated modern technology and complexities in plant and equipment design have brought many constraints in the area of Occupational Safety and Health policy making at national level. For planning of effective strategy on control of accidents and ill-health, timely and reliable information is vital.

The Ministry of Labour has been deeply concerned over the non-availability of occupational safety and health information for policy planning. To overcome this deficiency the scheme “Setting up of a Data Bank-cum-Information Centre” at Central Labour Institute, Mumbai was proposed during the 7th Five Year Plan. The scheme was approved by the Planning Commission in the 7th Plan.

The scheme was continued in the modified form during the 8th Plan period with the title “Development of Safety Health Information System and Data Bank”. During this period information systems were installed at the Central Labour Institute and the 3 Regional Labour Institutes. Data bases in the area of Major Accident Hazard Installations, hazardous chemicals, national specialist, ship inspection, Parliament question, FAS Proforma, Factories Act Amendment, Awards, etc. were developed. Information on Material Safety Data Sheets was disseminated to the industries and agencies related to occupational safety and health.

During the 9th Plan period DGFASLI website was launched. Abstracts of safety and health technical reports of DGFASLI were prepared, a national directory of organization profile was compiled, the statutes related to safety and health were computerized and ported on the website. Publication of INDOSHNEWS a quarterly news bulletin of this organization was started and till date 14 issues have been published, work related to translation of International Chemical Safety Cards in three Indian languages—Hindi, Tamil and Bangla was initiated with a view to make the cards available on the website.

1.2 The Project

The present Plan Scheme “Development of Safety Health Information System and Data Bank” being operated during the 10th Plan envisages creation of the National Inventory on Occupational Safety and Health Information to widen the information base and making available the information at one source to help in the activities specially those related to policy planning directed at improving the occupational safety and health of the workers.

The national inventory besides having OSH information state-wise collected through respective State Inspectorate will also include the following:

  • Abstracts of OSH national literature
  • OS H literature acquired from abroad
  • Factory Advice Service databases
  • Dock Safety related databases
  • Details of MAH installations, hazardous chemicals, national specialists, etc.
  • Scanner based data base on accident events, etc.

1.3 The Objectives of the Project

To develop all the five Labour Institutes under the DGFASLI Organisation as the action resource centers for collection, processing and dissemination of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Information with a view to create an Inventory on OSH Information for the prevention of Occupational Injuries and health problems in the country

1.4 The Scope of the Project

The proposed scheme will have the following components:

  • Development of Occupational Safety and Health national inventory and connectivity between State Factory Inspectorate and DGFASLI. The inventory will cover information pertaining to manufacturing activities covered under the Factories Act 1948, Occupational injuries and diseases in the sector, management of OSH at unit and state level.
  • Creation of occupational safety and health information action resource centers at five labour Institutes by providing them with computer hardware and software facilities and also by involving other organizations specialized in the field of safety, health and environment to participate in the project.
  • Human Resource Development of personnel attached to action resource centers.
  • Dissemination of information through electronic media using the latest information technology for creating public awareness about safety, health and environment.
  • Dissemination of information through conventional media to reach the large workforce including decision makers not having access to the information technology. This will include publication of newsletter, technical reports, safety cards etc.
  • Creation of databases containing information on handling of containers and dangerous goods, hazardous installations, inland container depots, minor and intermediate ports, competent persons, panel of doctors in ports, etc. Dock Safety division will participate by way of providing raw data collected from the field.
  • Developing infrastructure for occupational safety and health e-self learning centers all action resource centre in the labour institutes.
  • Effective implementation of the 12 point Minimum Agenda for E-Governance. This includes providing computers upto the level of Section Officers, setting up of LAN, training of all staff on computers, procure and use office automation software, website updating and maintenance, developing software packages for delivery of services and information, etc.
  • As information technology is developing very fast, the latest hardware and software available during the plan period will be acquired.

1.5 The Methodology

In order to create a national inventory of OSH information, the following activities are envisaged to be carried out in each State:

  • Identification of support information
  • Location of sources of information
  • Creation of suitable mechanism for information collection
  • Selection and use of appropriate technology for processing and storage of information.
  • Development of procedures for user friendly dissemination of
    information.
  • Development of suitable infrastructure for achieving the above.

1.6 The Project Team

The various activities under the Project are being carried out by the five Labour Institutes as nodal agencies. The Regional Labour Institute, Faridabad, is the nodal agency for the five states viz., NCT of Delhi, Chandigarh, Haryana, Punjab, Jammu Kashmir, and Himachal Pradesh.

The National Capital Territory of Delhi was taken up for the collection of data during the the year 2003. Subsequently the States of Haryana, Chandigarh, Punjab, Jammu Kashmir, and Himachal Pradesh will be taken up for the similar type of study.

The Task Force comprising of the following officers and staff of Regional Labour Institute, Faridabad and the office of the Chief Inspector of Factories, Chennai, was constituted for carrying out the study in hand.

Regional Labour Institute (RLI), Faridabad

  • Shri Moinul Haque, Director-in-Charge, RLI-Faridabad
  • DR. Avneesh Singh, Deputy Director (Ind. Psy.) - Coordinator
  • Shri S. C. Sharma, Asst.Director (Safety)

Management Information System (MIS), DGFASLI, Mumbai

  • Shri S.N. Borkar, Dy.Director(Prod.)
  • Shri P.N. Patil, Tech.Asstt.
  • Smt Jaya Vimalan, Stenographer Gr.III
  • Smt Pramila Ajila, Stenographer Gr.III

Inpsectorate of Factories, NCT of Delhi

  • Shri C. M. Bhasin, C.I.F.
  • Shri V. K. Sharma, Deputy C.I.F
  • Dr. Mirtunjay Kumar, Insp. of Factories (Med. cum Certifying Surgeon)
  • Shri M.P. Yadav, Asstt. Director (Planning Stat. Cell),Labour Dept.,Govt. Of NCT of Delhi.

1.7 Activities under the Project

The present project aims at studying the existing system of recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases at unit, district and state level in the NCT of Delhi, identifying the areas for improving and establishing the system, which is in line with the systems existing in other countries.

The activities of the project have been divided in the following categories:

  • Background information about National Capital Territory of Delhi - Deals with the demographic and geographic characteristics of NCT of Delhi, population in different districts and major occupations of the people.
  • Economic activities - Deals with the various aspects of economic sectors in the state, their value of production, employment generated and contribution to the GDP.
  • Activities in manufacturing sector -Deals with the different activities carried out in the manufacturing sector as per the National Industrial Code, value of production, employment generation, etc.
  • Occupational injuries and diseases - Deals with the analysis of the occupational injuries– fatal and non-fatal and cases of occupational diseases in the manufacturing sector.
  • Management of occupational safety and health - Deals with the infrastructure and resources available at the unit level and at the state level for managing the crucial issue of occupational safety and health.
  • Resources available and needed for the management of occupational safety and health.

Based on the analysis of occupational injuries and diseases and the capabilities available, an attempt is made to assess the resources required for the better management of occupational safety and health in the National Capital Territory of Delhi.

Background information

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The city of Delhi, with a population of more than 70 lakhs, has a distinct personality of its own. It is centuries old city with a glorious past history. Being the capital of the largest democracy i.e. India, it is gaining importance among the largest metropolitan cities of the world and the day is not far when it shall be viewed as a symbol of respect for which every India shall feel proud of.

Presently, growing at unprecedented pace, the city must be equipped to face the contemporary challenges. It should be able to integrate its elegant past as well as the modern developments into an organic whole. The inhabitants of this city should be able to live in safe convenient and lively surroundings. They should be able to improve their economic capabilities and share the fruits of modernization. All this demands purposeful transformation of its socio-economic, natural and built environment.

2.1. PHYSICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL STRUCTURE

Geograpahically, state of Delhi stretches from 28°-24’-17” to 28°-53’-00” North latitude and from 77°-50’-24” to 77°-20’-37” East latitudeThe national capital territory of Delhi can be divided by three local bodies i.e. Delhi Municipal Corporation, New Delhi Municipal Council and Delhi Cantonment Board. The area of Municipal Corporation has been divided into Rural and Urban while the other two local bodies are entirely urban. The NCT of Delhi is having 231 villages, 27 census towns, 9 districts, 3 municipal bodies /corporations, 2 tehsils.

2.1.1 Land area

As per the Delhi Statistical Handbook (2000), the land area of Delhi State is 1483 sq. km which is less than 1% of the total area of Indian union. The extreme greatest length of the State is 51.90 Kms and greatest >

TABLE – 2.1 Land area under NCT of Delhi (Local Bodies)

Name of the Local BodyArea in a sq.km
New Delhi Municipal Corporation42.74
Delhi Cantonment Board42.97
Delhi Municipal Corporation1397.29
Total1483.00

Source: Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

TABLE – 2.2 Land area under NCT of Delhi (Rural Urban)

AreaArea in a sq.km
Urban685.34
Rural797.66
Total1483.00

Source: Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

2.2 DEMOGRAPHIC CONTEXT

2.2.1 Population

As per the report of Directorate of Census Operation, Delhi (1991) the population of the State of the Delhi 94Lakhs. The data shown in the Table 2.3 indicate that more than 90% population (9024954) of NCT of Delhi is in the Delhi Municipal Corporation area. However, the density of the population is higher in the New Delhi Municipal Corporation (7050) as compared to Delhi Municipal Corporation (6459) and Delhi Contonment Board (2197).

TABLE–2.3 Population National Capital Territory of Delhi: Area-wise Distribution

AreaPopulationDensity of population per sq.km
New Delhi Municipal Council3012977050
Delhi Contonment Board943932197
Delhi Municipal Corpn. Urban, Rural & Census towns90249546459
TOTAL94206446352

Source: Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

The density of population (per sq.km) of NCT of Delhi is found highest (12361) in the urban area. In the rural area the density per sq.km is quite low i.e., 1190 as compared to population density of urban area (Refer to Table 2.4)

TABLE–2.4Population National Capital Territory of Delhi: Rural-Urban Distribution

AreaPopulationDensity of population per sq.km
National Capital Territory of Delhi – Urban847162512361
National Capital Territory of Delhi – Rural9490191190
TOTAL94206446352

As per Table 2.5 the area-wise male-female sex ratio of the total population of the NCT of Delhi is 827 female per thousand male. The Delhi Contonment Board is having the lowest number of females i.e., 638 per thousand male. The highest number of females (830) is with Delhi Municipal Corporation (Urban, Rural & Census towns)

TABLE–2.5 Population National Capital Territory of Delhi: Area-wise Distribution

AreaSex ratio (Female per thousand male)
New Delhi Municipal Council811
Delhi Contonment Board638
Delhi Municipal corpn. Urban, Rural & Census towns830
TOTAL827

Source : Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

While comparing (rural and urban) the sex ratio of NCT of Delhi (Table 2.6) it is found that as compared to the urban (830) the sex ratio is lower in the rural areas (807).

TABLE–2.6 Population Population National Capital Territory of Delhi: Rural-Urban Distribution

AreaSex Ratio (Female per thousand male)
National Capital Territory of Delhi – Urban830
National Capital Territory of Delhi – Rural807
TOTAL827

*Source : Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

2.2.2 Birth, Death, Infant Mortality Rate

As per the Delhi Statistical Handbook (2000) the birth rate per thousand population in the year 1998 was 23.33 and the death rate was 6.60. The State has infant mortality (live birth) rate of 31.3 per thousand.

2.2.3 Working population

As per the census report (1991) the working population of the NCT of Delhi is 2968377. The data given in the table>

Table- 2.7- Working Population : Workers by Industrial classification

GroupMaleFemaleTotal
Cultivators80135218534
Agricultural Labourers681010117821
Live Stock, Forestry & Fishing13598109414692
Mining & Quarrying25194342953
Manufacturing, Processing at Household Industry32805422537030
Manufacturing, Processing at Household Industry60377228036631808
Construction19013117384207515
Trade & Commerce63554337435672978
Transport Storage & Communication2118479317221164
Other Services703603187415891018
Total24086412868722695513

*Source : Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

2.2.4 Unemployment

As per the Directorate of Economics & Statistics Report (June 2002) on Employment & Unemployment situation in Delhi, it is found that there are 5.59 lakhs unemployed persons against an estimated total population of 132.98 lakhs persons in Delhi during 1999-2000. The unemployed persons (all age-groups) constituted about 4.20% of Delhi population and it is less than the national level aerage of unemployed which stood at 5.2% of country’s population. It is evident from the Table 1.8 that 3.69% of total males and 4.82% of total females were unemployed. It is further revealed that 2.83% of rural and 4.36% of the urban population is found to be unemployed.

Table-2.8 : Distribution of Estimated Persons Unemployed

ITEMESTIMATED NUMBER OF PERSONS
 RURALURBANDELHI
1) UNEMPLOYED
(a) Male
(b) Female
(c) Total
29273 (3.95)
8562 (1.43)
37835 (2.83)
239615 (3.67)
281680 (5.19)
521295 (4.36)
268888 (3.69)
290242 (4.82)
559130 (4.20)
2) ESTIMATED POPULATION

 

(a) Male
(b) Female
(c) Total

741159
598458
1339617
6536263
5422120
11958383
7277422
6020578
13298000
2.2.5 Per-Capita Income

The Per-Capita Income of the state is Rs. 29623(Adv. Est.) at current prices and Rs. 19610(Adv. Est.) at constant prices for the year 2000-2001 (base year 1993-94). The Net State Domestic Product for the year 1999-2000 at current prices is Rs. 4068633 lakhs (Adv. Est.) and Rs. 2693371 lakhs (Adv. Est.) at constant prices. The details are given in the Table 2.9.

Table 2.9 - Net State Domestic Product by industry of origin

SectorNet State Domestic Product by industry of origin (Rs. in lakhs)
 At Current PricesAt Constant Prices (Base year 1993-94)
Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Forestry & Fishing6161140288
Mining and Quarrying22379
Manufacturing277557200786
Electricity, Gas and Water Supply10674340270
Construction241979170278
Trade, Hotels & Restaurants957578657783
Transport, Storage and Communication208252149691
Financing, Insurance, Real Estate & Business Services1491516978723
Community, Social and Personal Services723174455473
Gross State Domestic Product40686332693371

*Source : Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (199

2.4 Economic Scenario

The Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) which is the aggregate income of the state increased from Rs. 3995076 lakhs in 1998-1999 to 4451009 in 1999-2000 registering an impressive growth rate of 10.24% at current prices. The Gross State Domestic Product by industry of origin at the constant prices (base year 1993-94) for the year 1999-2000 (Adv.Est.) is 2977536 lakhs The sectoral distribution of state income during 1999-2000 is given in Table 2.10.

Table 2.10 - Gross State Domestic Product by industry of origin

SectorGross State Domestic Product by industry of origin (Rs. in lakhs)
 At Current PricesAt Constant Prices (Base year 1993-94)
Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Forestry & Fishing6345841546
Mining and Quarrying22379
Manufacturing348256253928
Electricity, Gas and Water Supply11278850197
Construction253972178966
Trade, Hotels & Restaurants981676676652
Transport, Storage and Communication322979234041
Financing, Insurance, Real Estate & Business Services16016151058422
Community, Social and Personal Services766042483705
Gross State Domestic Product44510092977536

*Source : Directorate of Census Operations, Delhi (1991)

Manufacturing sector

MANUFACTURING SECTOR

There are in 1981, about 46,000 industrial units; 77 percent with less than 10 workers, and 16 per cent with workers between 10 to 20. By 2001 the number of industrial units are likely to increase of about 93,000. The percentage of work force in the industrial sector has been constantly increasing. There has been considerable change in the industrial structure of the city in the past three decades and more so after 1975. The following two types of industries which are present need based have grown very rapidly.

  • Electrical and Electronics.
  • Rubber, Plastic and Petroleum products.

As per the Delhi Master Plan the hazardous and noxious industrial units are not permitted in Delhi. Therefore, most of the hazardous and noxious industrial units have moved out of Delhi. Further, it has also decided that no new heavy and large industrial units shall be permitted in the NCT of Delhi. No new extensive industrial unit is permitted except in existing identified extensive industrial areas.

Working Factories in the NCT of Delhi

During the year 2000 the highest number of factories i.e., 1239 were manufacturer of woven apparels, followed by 584- manufacturer of fabricated metal products (except machinery, 569- manufacturer of basic metals, 467- manufacturer of Rubber, 458-manufacturer of machinery, 419-manufacturer of motor vehicles)

The highest number of workers (56178) are employed manufacturer of woven apparels, followed by approximately 15000 each workers are employed in the publishing, printing; manufacturer of motor vehicles; manufacturer of fabricated metal products, and sale, maintenance and repair of motor cycle.

In total there are total number of 221050 number of workers are working in the 6496 different factories working in the city of Delhi. The details are given in the table>

Table No. 3.1: Industry-wise Break-up of Working Factory and Workers employed therein New NIC, WISE
Industry codeDescriptionNo. of Working Factories Year- 2000No. of Workers Employed Year- 2000
15Manufacturer of food Products2088295
16Manufacturer Tobacco Products262084
17Manufacturer of Textiles2393926
18Manufacturer of woven apparel123956178
19Tanning & Dressing of Leather2277553
20Manufacturer of wood and products31419
21Manufacturer of Paper862036
22Publishing, Printing34515546
23Manufacturer of coke, refined petroleum products101964
24Manufacturer of chemicals2396252
25Manufacturer of Rubber46710709
26Manufacturer of other non- metallic Mineral products691243
27Manufacturer of Basic Metal5699057
28Manufacturer of fabricated metal products, except machinery58416642
29Manufacturer of Machinery45811221
30Manufacturer of office accounting18328
31Manufacturer of electrical machinery3048573
32Manufacturer of radio , television2859276
33Manufacturer of Medical Precision892444
34Manufacturer of Motor vehicles41914605
35Manufacturer of other transport equipment862209
36Manufacturer of Furniture1183794
40Electricity244446
50Sale, Maintenance and repair of motor vehicles19715192
51Wholesale Trade118
52Retail Trade422197
60Land Transport366
63Supporting and auxiliary transport activities291385
72Computer and related activities5145
73Research and development4130
74Other Business activities10178
75Public Administration19489
80Education3391
85Health and social work148
90Sewage and refuse disposal71239
93Other service activities35772
Total6496221050

Source : Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES COVERED UNDER THE FACTORIES ACT, 1948

4.1 REGISTERED FACTORIES

4.1.1 Working Factories

As per the data during the year 2002, NCT of Delhi had 6957 number of registered industries. However the growth rate of the number of factories is not very high. The data presented in the table> From the year 1989 to 1994 there was highest number of industries treated as closed. Prior this period the number of industries treated as closed was less than 50%. Since 1995 slowly the number of industries treated as closed is reducing and it has come down to 521 in the year 2000. Regarding the removal registered industries during the year we find that 1993, 1994 & 1995 has witnessed the highest number i.e. 282, 104 and 164 respectively. As per the latest data available, in the year 2000 they were 7022 factories at the beginning of the year and at the end of the year total number of factories were 7203 out of which 521 treated as closed. During the year 2000, the maximum number of industries i.e., 2022 were registered which is highest in the last 5 years.

The trend clearly indicates the affect of decisions given by Delhi High Court and Supreme Court and accordingly the changes made in the industrial policies, during the last 10 years. The shift of hazardous installations/factories from the densely populated Delhi localities to outskirts of the State and also the closure of the specific factories had led to changes in the population of the industries.

Table No. 4.1: Number of Registered Factories under the Factories Act, 1948
YearAt the beginning of YearRegistered during the YearRemoved during the YearAt the end of YearTreated closedWorking by the end of Year
19884995262105247595188
198952472654254706664804
199054702507356476744973
199156472054358096745135
19925809255760576475410
1993605733628261116305481
1994611139810464057285781
1995640526316465045595945
199665041625266145386076
199766141651667635346229
199867631432668805306354
199968801813970225266496
200070222224172035216682
2001*6682171060847NIL6847
2002*6847130206957NIL6957

* Provisional figures

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Working Factories under various Sections of the Factories Act, 1948

The data placed at the Table 4.2 clearly reveal the fact that most of the large number of industries are closed or relocated in some other State. During the year 1991 the factories registered under Factories Act, 1948 working with or without power irrespective of their number of workers employed were 71 which further went up to 73. However, during the year 1993, it started reducing and came down to 20 and next year further it was reduced to 19. Since 1995 to 2000 the number of industries under Section 85 remain constant i.e., 13 only.

The factories employing 10 or more workers and working with the aid of power (working under the Section 2m(i) of the Factories Act, 1948) are increasing gradually and the number of these industries has reached to 6525 as against 4949 in the year 1991.

The Section 2m(ii) which includes the factories employing 20 or more workers and working without the aid of power has not shown a sharp increase. This trend may be because of the technological advancement and introduction of CNC machines even in the small scale and cottage industries.

The total number of working factories under all the sections of Factories Act, 1948 show a gradual increase starting from 5162 in the year 1991 to 6682 in the year 2000.

The data obtained can be summarized as factories working under Section 2m(i) are fastest growing and it is followed by factories under Section 2m(ii). However, the number of industries under Section 85 have reduced to 1/5th in the last 10 years.

Table No. 4.2: Working Factories under various Sections of the Factories Act 1948

Year2m (i)2m (ii)85Total
19914949142715162
19925189148735410
19935312149205481
19945617145195781
19955783149135945
19965915149136077
19976068148136229
19986190147136350
19996336147136496
20006525144136682
2001*6685144186847
2002*6813144Nil6957

* Provisional figures

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Note:

Section 2m(i)- Denotes factories employing 10 or more workers and working with the aid of power.

Section 2m(ii)- Denotes factories employing 20 or more workers and working without the aid of power.

Section 85- Denotes declared factories registered under factories Act,1948
working with or power irrespective their number and workers employed.

In the year 1991 the private sector factories working under Factories Act, 1948 were only 4954. Consistently, the number of industries have shown a rise as it has grown to 6957 in the year 2000. The industries owned by the Government are ranging from 137 to 139 in the last one decade. Because of growth in the private sector industries, the total number of industries have gone up from 5162 in the year 1991 to 6682 in the year 2000. As far as, the industries working under Section 85 of the Factories Act, 1948, the number has gone down to 18 in the year 2001. During the year 1991, the number of industries under Section 85 were 71 which went upto 73 in the year 1992. In the year 1995 this number came down to 13 and remained unchanged till 2000. The major change observed in the number of industries under Section 85 may be result of time to time change in the industrial policies of the Government of NCT of Delhi.

Table No. 4.3: Working Factories under various Sections of the Factories Act, 1948
YearPrivateGovernmentU/S 85Total
19914954137715162
19925198139735410
19935323138205481
19945425137195781
19955794138135945
19965925138136076
19976077139136229
19986198139136350
19996344139136496
20006531138136682
2001*6847138186691
2002*6957138-6801

* Provisional figures

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

4.1.2 Employment in the Registered Factories

The growth of factories submitting returns under the Factories Act, 1948 show a steep rise as they were only 998 factories in the year 1995 which upto 1548 in the year 1999 and sliding back to 1329 in the year 2000. The average daily employment by these industries located in the national capital of Delhi has gone up from 44548 in the year 1995 to 53013 in the year 2000.

The number of factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948 which are not submitting the returns is more or less constant as the total number moved in a narrow range of 4949 to 5353. The average daily employment by the industries not submitting the returns has considerably reduced from more than two lakhs to less than one lakh eighty thousand.

The total number of industries have risen which was 5945 in the year 1995 to 6682 in the year 2000. However, the average daily employment by these industries have reduced to 230386 in the year 2000 from 254002 in the year 1995 .

The interpretation of this trend i.e., growing number of industries with reduction in the manpower, indicate towards the steep growth of advanced automatic and CNC machines which does not require much manpower.

Table No. 4.4:Number of Registered under the Factories Act, 1948 and average Daily Employment therein in the National Capital Territory of Delhi
YearFactories Submitted ReturnsFactories Not Submitted ReturnsTotal
 NumberAverage daily employmentNumberAverage daily employmentNumberAverage daily employment
19959984454849492094545945254002
199610903325049862171806076250430
199712125050450172167686229267272
199814135039249372145446350264936
199915485729649481637546496221050
200013295301353531773736682230386

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Distribution of the total number of working factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948 submitting returns by number of days worked was 998 in the year 1995 which gradually started increasing and reached the peak of 1548 in the year 1999 ultimately receding to 1329 in the year 2000. The registered factories submitting returns of more than 300 days were 888 in the year 1995 and went upto 1432 in the year 1999 and again reduced to 1243 in the year 2000.

Another growing bunch is the factories having more than 180 working days but not more than 240 days. In the year 1995, it was only 4 which became 8 in the year 1996 and further it became 10 in the year 1998. There is no reporting of the industry in this category in the year 1999 but again in the year 2000 it rose to 16. Similarly, the days worked also increased from 30 to 477 in a span of 6 years i.e. from 1995 to 2000.

Since 1995 there is no factory registered under the Factories Act, 1948 submitting the returns for less than or 60 days worked.

Table No. 4.5: Distribution of Working Factories Registered under the Factories Act, 1948 submitting returns by number of days worked
Year60 days or lessMore than 60 but not more than 120 daysMore than 120 but not more than 180 daysMore than 180 but not more than 240 daysMore than 240 but not more than 300 daysMore than 300 daysTotal
1995F--34103888998
E--463250373943344548
1996F-2486310131090
E-1375917231082977433250
1997F-42812610721212
E-971312266544361850504
1998F-1-1014512571413
E-5-37791984081250392
1999F-47-10514321548
E-109139-67505029857296
2000F-2-166812431329
E-9-37732814924653013

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Note: F - No. of Working Factories

E – Employment

The data shown in the table> show rise in the number of factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948 which are submitting the returns. It is revealed through the table> Only one factory employing 1489 workers is existing in the next lower strata. The next category i.e., employing more than 500 workers but less than 1000 workers is having presently only 2 industries employing total number of 1397 workers. In the category of the working factories employing more than 100 but less than 500 workers there is a rise in the number of industries since 1995. It was 61 factories in the year 1995 which went upto 106 in the year 1999 finally settling down to 93 in the year 2000. However, the total number of workers employed in this category of working factories is presently 15965 only as compared to 18396 in the year 1999. The working factories employing 50 or more workers but less than 100 workers there is a continuous and steep rise. As compared to 1995 the growth of number of industries is more than 250% (168) upto the year 2000. Accordingly, the number of the workers working in these factories has also gone up from 4993 to 12627. The category of working factories employing 20 or more workers but less than 50 workers do not indicate any constant growth. The total number of industries and workers working in these factories, during the last 6 years remain more or less same.

The next lower category of the factories i.e. 10 or more but less than 20 workers has shown a marginal increase in the number of workers and also number of industries during the last 6 years. However, the number of working factories employing less than 10 workers has gone up from 27 in the year 1995 to 277 in the year 2000. This is steep growth went to the peak of 337 in the year 1999. Accordingly, the number of employee employed in this category has also gone up manifolds as it was only 171 in t he year 1995 and has gone up to 2239 in the year 2000. The findings of this table> The trend clearly indicates that the State of Delhi has become the major hub of the factories with a smaller setup equipped with modern machineries.

Table No. 4.6- Distribution of Working Factories Registered under the
Factories Act,1948 submitting returns by Working Strength

YearsLess than 10 Workers10 or more but less than 20 Workers20 or more but less than 50 Workers50 or more but less than 100 Workers100 or more but less than 500 Workers500 or more but less than 1000 Workers1000 or more but less than 5000 Workers5000 or more WorkersTotal
1995F27298547616132-998
E17150481771649931180915953216-44548
1996F26538027210765-1-1090
E128151978048730310252-1169-33250
1997F2253413921481024--1212
E149348041235410580185252748--50504
1998F3264543961458921-1413
E2115621812159104021688113581259-50392
1999F33746947615410642-1548
E2101637514727104061839625982693-57296
2000F2773983991689321-1329
E2239600213294126271596513971489-53013

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Note: F - No. of Working Factories

E - Employment

The industrywise breakup of working factories in the State of Delhi reflect that the number of working factories under Industry Code 21,22,29, and 30 has gone up during the year 1997, 1998, 1999. The factories with the Industrial Code 23,24,25,27,40,41,42,61,68,70,73,89,90,91,92,98, and 99 show no change in the number of installations. However, it is noteworthy that there is no group of industries which has reduced number of installations during the year 1997-1999.

As regards, the number of workers employed therein is concerned the industries with a code number 23,24,25 ,61,70 and 89 have shown a considerable reduction. Industries with a Code number 28,31,34,39 have shown a considerable amount of increase in their work force. The total number of industries have gone up from 6076 to 6350 accordingly the number of workers employed has marginally gone up from 250350 to 264936.

Table 4.7 : Industry-wise Break-up of Working Factory and Workers employe therein (OLD NIC WISE)
Industry codeDescriptionNo. of Working Factories
1997 1998 1999
No. of Workers Employed
1997 1998 1999
21.Manufacturer of Food Production167190190812992908741
22.Manufacturer of Beverages, Tabacco & Tobacco Products323234265433343305
23.Manufacturer of Cotton Textiles595959598059915644
24Manufacturer of Wool Silks Synthetic Fibre textiles31313111261153605
25.Manufacturer of Jute Hemp & Mesta Textiles555244234222
26Manufacturer of Textiles Products (including wearing apparel other than footwear)121712431278556445630357581
27Manufacturer of Wood & Products furniture &Fixtures575757185120211939
28Mnaufacturer of Paper and Paper Products373395411146191576017172
29Manufacturer of Leather & Leather fur except repair626364259226702445
30.Manufacturer of Rubber Plastic Petroleum Coal Products220232237749292789169
31.Manufacturer of Chemical & Chemical Products (except product of petroleum & coal)610620642189702217822940
32.Manufacturer of Non-Metallic Mineral Products707170249727872792
33.Manufacturer of Basic Metal & Alloys Ind.548553564152941584315681
34.Manufacturer of Metal Products and Parts, Machinery and Transport Equipments563572575189211983820232
35.Manufacturer of Machinery Machine Tools & including Electrical Appliances103510511059425714790843529
36.Parts except Transport Machinery103510511059425714790843529
37.Manufacturer of Tpt.Equip. and parts489499500179301699516554
38.Other manufacturing industries182188191675172677168
39.Repair of capital goods505052838092239686
40.Electricity888319331443173
41.Gas and stream777296296297
42.Water works and supply101010119711971194
61.Wholesale Trade in Fuel, Chemicals, Perfumery, ceramics, glass111483214
68.Retail Trade in others555155154166
70.Land Transport2229310725
73.Service Incidental to Transport111294020
74.Storage and Warehousing282829153717061509
82.Real Estate & Business Services------
89.Business Service elsewhere >111111425425400
90.Public Administration and Defence Services191919478476489
91.Sanitary Services777126912691264
92.Education, Science and Research Services777384384466
93.Health and Social Work-11-1847
96.Personnel Services343434169016751710
97.Repair Services166176180789281998734
98.International and another Extra Territorial------
99.Service n.e.c.111192723
 Total607662296350250350267272264936

Occupational injuries in manufacturing activities covered under Factories Act 1948

OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES

Industrial injuries in Factories

The State of Delhi has got the total number of 6957 registered factories under the Factories Act, 1948. During the year 1994 there were 9 fatal accidents which further increased in the year 1995 to 10 and reached to the peak of 17 in the year 1996. However, in the year 2000 it has come down to 5. Similarly, the trend of non-fatal accidents from the year 1994 to 2000 has shown a clear cut downward trend as it was 481 in the year 1994, 427 in the year 1995, 306 in the year 1996, 102 in the year 1997 and ultimately coming down to 50 only in the year 2000. The reason for this steep down trend may be the result of continuous efforts made by Central and State Governments and different NGOs working for improving the working conditions resulting better provisions in the area of occupational safety and health.

As far as, the number of accidents per thousand workers is concerned the data (Table No. 5.1) reveal that there is a continuous reduction starting from 1.63 in the year 1994 to 0.22 in the year 2000.

The fatal accidents per thousand workers is 0.02 which is quite low as compared to other years except 1998 were it was only 0.01.

Table No. 5.1: Industrial injuries in Factories and their incidence Rate
Particulars1994199519961997199819992000
Number of Accidents
Fatal91017124115
Non-fatal481427306102706450
Number of accidents per thousand workers
Fatal0.030.030.070.050.010.050.02
Non-fatal1.631.381.200.410.260.290.22

Source: Labour Statistics (2000), Planning & Statistical Cell, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

The data given in the table> During the 1988 when the 196156 workers were employed in the NCT of Delhi there were 12 14 accidents i.e. 6.19 accidents per thousand workers but slowly with the continuous efforts of the different agencies and institutions it has gradually come down to only 5 accidents in the year 2000 which is only 0.24 accidents per thousand workers.

Table No. 5.2: Number of workers and accident rate per thousand workers in registered factories
YearNo. of workers employedNo.of accidentsAccident rate per thousand workers
198819615612146.19
198923340010304.63
19902331328303.56
19912439514892.00
19922607915492.11
19932740485331.94
19942529774901.94
19952540024371.72
19962504303231.28
19972672721140.42
1998264936740.28
1999221050750.34
200023038650.24

Source: Labour Statistics (2000), Planning Statistical Cell, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

Industrial injuries classified by causes

The data presented in the Table 5.3 regarding industrial injuries classified by causes clearly indicate that in the industries there were no fatal or non-fatal injuries due to explosion, gassing, planning machines vertical, spindale moulding machines, power shunted and manually shunted (railways). Non-fatal injuries due to persons falling from a height, on a flat etc., has been reported every year. Similarly, because of use of hand tools or person struck by falling bodies they are non-fatal accidents reported regularly during the years starting from 1998 to 2001.

Overall during the years 1998- 2001 there is a sharp fall in the number of non-fatal injuries as it was 70 in the year 1998 which has come down to 53 in the year 2001.

Table No. 5.3: Industrial injuries classified by causes
S.NoCauses1998199920002001
  FNFFNFFNFFNF
12345678910
1Prime movers (steam, gas and other engines electric, motors (non-electric shocks) (10)0201----1-
2Transmission machinery
(a) Shafting (102)
(b) Belts, ropes pulleys & gearing
(103)
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
01
-
1
-
4
2
3Lifting machinery (104)---3----
4Machinery tools for metal working
(a) Power presses (other than
punches (105)
(b) Others (106)
-
-
-
01
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
1
5Wood working machinery
(a) Circular Saws (all types) (107)
(b) Planning machines (108)
(c) Verticle spindle moulding
machines (109)
(d) Others (110)
-
-
-
-
01
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6Rollers of calendars, mixture etc. not for metal, wood working (nip) accidents (111)---01----
7Others (Machinery) move by mechanical power (112)-01-01----
8Railways
(a) Power Shunted (113)
(b) Manually Shunted (114)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9Other vehicles (include trucks, boggies, etc.)
(a) Driven by power (115)
(b) Manually handled (116)
-
-
01
-
-
-
01
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
3
10Electricity (117)-04-02----
11Explosions (118)--------
12Fires (119)---01-01--
13Gassing (120)--------
14Molten metal and other hot or corrosive substance (121)-----01--
15Machinery not moved by mechanical power
(a) Lifting machinery (122)
(b) Others (123)
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
16Use of hand tools (124)-2-20---2
17Struck by falling body (125)-145-26-7
18Persons falling
(a) Falling from a height>
(b) Falling on a flat (127)
(c) Falling into pits, excavations etc.
(128)
-
-
-
2
2
2
3
-
-
3
5
3
-
-
-
6
-
4
-
-
-
5
6
-
19Stepping on or striking against object (129)-6------
20Handling goods or articles (130)-26-----2
21Others (131)220411511-7
 TOTAL4701164550253

Source: Labour Statistics (2000), Planning & Statistical Cell, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

N.B. F = Fatal

NF = Non-fatal

Industrial injuries classified by Industrial Classification

The non-fatal industrial injuries are found highest in the manufacturing food unit as it remained in double digit through out the years i.e. 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001. During these years there was a continuous reporting of the non-fatal injuries in the industries classified as manufacturing of paper and paper products, printing, publishing and allied industries; manufacturing of basic metals and alloys; manufacturing of machinery, machine tools and parts except electrical machinery; manufacturing of transport equipment and parts; electricity ; and water works and water supply. In rest of the industries there was no regular reporting of non-fatal injuries.

Regarding the fatal injuries there is no clear cut trend however , the total number of fatal injuries has remained controlled and there were only 2 fatal accident during the year 2001.

Table No. 5.4: Industrial injuries classified by Industrial Classification
S.NoDescription1998199920002001
  FNFFNFFNFFNF
12345678910
21Manufacture of food products-25420-19-18
22Manufacture of beverages, tobacco and tobacco products--------
23Manufacture of cotton textiles--------
24Manufacture of wool silks synthetic fibre textiles------1-
25Manufacture of jute hemp & mesta textiles----1---
26Manufacture of textiles products (including wearing apparel other than footwear)-7------
27Manufacture of wood and wood products furniture and fixtures--------
28Manufacture of paper and paper products printing publishing and allied industries-4-11-418
29Manufacture of leather and leather fur except repair--------
30Manufacture of rubber plastic petroleum coal products-14----2
31Manufacture of chemicals and chemical products (except product of petroleum and coal)---5-2--
32Manufacture of non-metallic mineral products-3-----3
33Manufacture of basic metal and alloys industries-1-6-5-1
34Manufacture of metal products and parts, machinery and transport equipments22--5---
35Manufacture of machinery machine tools and parts except electrical machinery-3-3-1-1
36Manufacture of electrical machinery, apparatus, appliances and supplies and parts---1---2
37Manufacture of transport equipment and parts-3-4-2-2
38Other manufacturing industries1------2
40Electricity13-313-2
41Gas and steam--------
42Water works and supply-4-729-3
70Land transport--------
71Water transport--------
72Air transport---2-1-1
73Storage and ware-housing--------
90Public administration and Defence Services--------
91Sanitary Services--------
92Education, scientific and research services--------
96Personal services--------
97Repair services-14-1---4
98International and another extra territorial bodies--31---4
 TOTAL4701164946253

Source: Labour Statistics (2000), Planning & Statistical Cell, Govt. of NCT of Delhi

N.B. F = Fatal

NF = Non-fatal

Occupational diseases and poisoning in manufacturing activities

OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES IN MANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES

ILO Code of Practice on Recording and Notification of Occupational Accidents and Diseases defines occupational diseases as “a disease contracted as a result of an exposure of risk factors arising from work activity.” Under Section 89 of the Factories Act, 1948 where any worker in a factory contracts any of the diseases specified in the Third Schedule (Annexure-1), the manager of the factory shall send a notice thereof to such authorities and in such form and within such time as my be prescribed.

Also any medical practitioner attending on a person who is or has been employed in a factory and is suffering from diseases specified in the Third Schedule shall without delay send a report in writing to the office of the Chief Inspector of Factories.

In the NCT of Delhi there was no reporting of occupational disease during the last 3 years. The Inspector of Factories (medical) visited 94 factories and examined 1035 workers. However, no pathological investigations and x-rays were carried out because of the lack of facilities available with the department.

Table No. 6.1: Inspection carried out by the Inspector of Factories (Medical)
Particulars1998199920002001*2002*
Number of Factories Inspected211291309494
Number of Workers Examined208151111499371035
X-ray taken10--------
Pathology test done10--------
Cases of occupational disease detected---------

* Provisional figures

Source:: Labour Statistics, Planning & Statistical Cell, Government of NCT of Delhi

Management of occupational safety and health at unit level

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT UNIT LEVEL

7.1 Introduction

The management of occupational safety and health at the unit level, i.e. manufacturing units, involves the following aspects:

  • Safety Policy
  • Appointment of Safety Officers
  • Safety Committee
  • Occupational Health Centers (FMO, Ambulance)
  • Welfare Measures (WO, Canteen, crèche, lunch room, Shelter etc.)
  • On-Site Emergency Plans
  • Safety Reports
  • Safety Audits
  • HAZOP studies

As on date there are 16 Major Accident Hazard Installations in the national capital territory of Delhi out of these 16 installations so far 5 installations have not conducted the safety audit which is mandatory as per the factories act. As far as the on-site emergency plan and mock drill is concerned all the factories have done it.

The table showing the details such as name and address of the factory with registration number, hazardous chemical handled, on-site emergency plan, mock drill and status of safety audit is given as under :

Management of occupational safety and health at state level

MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH AT STATE LEVEL

8.1 Introduction

Management of safety and health at the state level is more complex than at the unit level. At unit level the problems are relatively simple and unit specific depending upon the type of industry. However at the state level the management of safety and health is not unit or industry specific and the instruments such as policies, legislation, etc. are required to be more comprehensive to take care of safety and health issues in all type of occupations. Apart from the Factories Act, 1948, there are other legislations for providing a better work environment, safety, health and welfare facilities. These legislations are enforced by various state government authorities such as the Chief Inspector of Factories, the State Labour Commissioner, etc.

Table No. 8.1.List of acts applicable/in force in the National Capital Territory of Delhi
A. Labour Acts being implemented by the Labour Department
  • The Industrial Employment (S.O.) Act, 1046
  • The Factories Act, 1948
  • The Delhi Shops Establishment Act, 1954
  • The Workmen’s Compensation Act, 1923
  • The Minimum Wages Act, 1948
  • The Equal Remuneration Act, 1976
  • The Payment of Bonus Act, 1965
  • The Trade Union Act, 1926
  • The Indian Boilers Act, 1923
  • The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972
  • The Contract Labour (RA) Act, 1970
  • The Bombay Lifts Act, 1939
  • Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976
  • The Inter-State Migrant Workers (RECS) Act, 1979
  • The Bombay Smoke Nuisance Act
  • The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947
  • The Payment of Wages Act, 1936
  • The Working Journalists (Condition of Service Miscellaneous provisions) Act, 1955
  • The Child Labour (Prohibition Regulation) Act, 1986
  • The Punjab Industrial Establishment (Casual, Sick Leave Festival) (as extended to Delhi) 1965
  • The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961
  • The Labour Laws (Exemptions from furnishing returns and maintaining register by certain establishment) Act, 1988
  • The Motor Transport Workers Act, 1961
  • The Regulations for Licencing and Controlling place of amusement and performance for Public amusement Act, 1980
B. Labour Acts being implemented by other Department
  • The Bonded Labour (System) Abolition Act, 1976 (Office of Deputy Commissioner, Delhi)
  • Employees State Insurance Act, 1948, (Directorate of Health Services)
  • Employees Provident Fund Act, 1952, (Office of the Provident Fund Commissioner)

There are different departments under various ministries of Central and State Government, NGOs and institutions working for the safety and health of the people at work. Some of the important departments/institutions are as under :

INSPECTORATE OF FACTORIES OF LABOUR DEPARTMENT

The Inspectorate of Factories, Labour Department, Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi, enforces the following legislations pertaining to occupational safety, health, welfare, working hours etc. of workers working in factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948 and located within the N.C.T. of Delhi:-

1. The Factories Act, 1948

The Factories Act, is a social legislation which has been enacted for occupational safety, health and welfare of workers at work places. This legislation is being enforced by technical officers i.e. Inspectors of Factories, Dy. Chief Inspectors of Factories who work under the control of the Chief Inspector of Factories and the Labour Commissioner.

Applicability:- It applies to factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948. The industries in which ten (10) or more than ten workers are employed on any day of the preceding twelve months and are engaged in manufacturing process being carried out with the aid of power or twenty(20) or more than twenty workers are employed in manufacturing process being carried out without the aid of power, are covered under the provisions of this Act.

Salient Features of the Act are:-

  • Approval of Factory Building Plans before construction/extension, under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950 .
  • Grant of Licences under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950, and action against factories running without obtaining licence.
  • Renewal of Licences granted under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950, by the Dy. Chief Inspectors of Factories.
  • Grant of "Certificate of Competency" to Persons/ Institutions for testing, examination, inspection and certification of equipments, such as, Pressure Plants, lifting machines, etc. in factories, by the Chief Inspector of Factories.
  • Inspections of factories by District Inspectors of Factories, for investigation of complaints, serious/fatal accidents as well as suo moto inspections to check compliance of provisions of this Act relating to (i) health(ii) safety (iii) welfare facilities,(iv) working hours(v) Employment of young persons(vi) Annual Leave with wages.
  • Medical examination of workers engaged in dangerous/hazardous processes examination and certification of young persons by the Certifying Surgeon, in accordance with the provisions of this Act with a view to monitor occupational health of workers.

Administrative Machinery:-

The enforcement of this legislation is being carried out on district basis by the district Inspectors of Factories. After inspection, improvement notices are issued to the defaulting managements and ultimately legal action is taken against the defaulting managements. The Inspectors of Factories file challans against the defaulters, conduct and defend them in the Courts of Metropolitan Magistrates. The work of Inspectors of Factories is supervised by the Dy. Chief Inspector of Factories on district basis. The detail of Inspections/prosecutions during last 2 years is enclosed as Appendix 'A'.

Penalties:-This Act provides for a maximum punishment up to two years and or a fine up to Rs. one lakh or both. Most of the challans are being contested with the result that the Inspector of Factories are most of the time busy in the Courts in filing, conducting and defending challans filed by them.

2. The Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules, 1989

These Rules have been framed under the Environment Protection Act, 1986 by the Government of India, Ministry of Environment.

Applicability :- These Rules apply to all workplaces in which the hazardous chemicals are manufactured or stored.

Administrative Machinery :- The responsibility of the Inspectorate of Factories under these Rules is to check enforcement of this legislation in industrial installations covered under the Factories Act, 1948 . In the NCT of Delhi, there are 13 Major Accident Hazard Control (MAH) factories. The MAH factories are those in which the quantity of hazardous substance is more than the threshold limit prescribed under these Rules.

Salient Features of this legislation are:-

  • Labelling of Containers containing hazardous substances.
  • Developing Material Safety Data Sheets ( MSDS) of hazardous substance and making available to workers etc. and others.
  • Preparation of On-site Emergency Plan for chemical disaster by MAH factories in consultation with the Factories Inspectorate, to carry out mock-drill and to modify and update from time to time.
  • Preparation of Off-site Emergency Plan, for the district, for chemical disaster, by the Dy. Commissioner, with the assistance of Factories Inspectorate, and to carry out mock-drill and to modify and update from time to time.
  • Issue of Improvement Notices by Factories Inspectorate and other authorities.

3. The Chemical Accidents(Emergency Planning Preparedness Response) Rules,1996.

The Government of India , Ministry of Environment under the Environment Protect Act, 1996 has promulgated the Chemical Accidents(Emergency Planning Preparedness Response) Rules,1996, to preparedness and response, during operation of On-site and Off-site Emergency Plans during chemical disasters.

Administrative Machinery:- Under these Rules "State Crisis Group" and "District Crisis Groups" have been constituted and the "Local Crisis Groups" are required to be constituted.

(1) State Crisis Group :- The Chief Secretary, Government of NCT of Delhi is the ex-officio Chair-person of the State Crisis Group with Labour Commissioner-cum-Secretary(Labour) as its Member-Secretary besides Chief Fire Officer and Chief Inspector of Factories and ten other persons as members of the State Crisis Group, besides four other co-opted members in accordance with the provisions of these Rules .

Functions of State Crisis Group :- The major function of the State Crisis Group is to review all District Off-site Emergency Plans in the State, with a view to examine its adequacy and to assist the State Government in the planning, preparedness and mitigation during a major chemical accident, and to continuously monitor the post-accident situation arising out of a major chemical accident in the State and to forward a report to the Central Crisis Group . The first meeting of the State Crisis Group was held on 8.8.2000 and second meeting was held on 21.05.2001. In compliance with the decisions taken during the meetings, the Labour Department has published a Compendium giving list of experts and officials in the NCT of Delhi alongwith duties of various authorities during operation of an Off-site Emergency Plan. The State Crisis Group is required to meet once in three months.

(2) "District Crisis Groups":- The Dy. Commissioner of the district is the ex-officio Chair person of the District Crisis Group with Inspector of Factories as Member-Secretary of the District Crisis Group.

Functions of the District Crisis Groups :- is to assist in the preparation of the district off-site emergency plan, review all the on-site emergency plans and assist the district administration in the management of chemical accident at a site and continuously monitor chemical accidents. The District Crisis Group is also required to conduct one full scale mock-drill of a chemical accident at a site every year and to forward a Report on the strength and the weakness of the Plan to the State Crisis Group. The District Crisis Group is required to meet once in 45 days.

"Local Crisis Groups":- Under these Rules, Local Crisis Groups are also required to be constituted. The "Local Crisis Group" is a body in the industrial pocket, to deal with chemical accident and to coordinate efforts in planning, preparedness and mitigation efforts during a Chemical accident. Its duties require preparation of Local Emergency Plan for industrial pocket dovetailing of Local Emergency Plan, with the district Off-site Emergency Plan and to train personnel in chemical management and to educate the people( population) likely to be affected during a chemical accident about the remedies and existing preparedness and to conduct at least one full scale mock-drill of a chemical accident at a site once in every six months and to forward a report to the District Crisis Group . This group is required to meet once in a month. The Local Crisis Groups have not been constituted so far.

4. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961 .

Application :- This Act is a central legislation, which provides maternity benefit to woman workers and is applicable on factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948 . It also applies on shops and establishments in which ten or more workers are employed or were employed on any day of the preceeding twelve months.

Important Provisions :- The provisions of this Act shall not apply to any factory or other establishment to which the provisions of Employee State Insurance Act, 1948 apply for the time being. Since the factories covered under Factories Act, 1948 are also covered under Employees State Insurance Act, the Maternity benefit Act practically does not apply to the workers and employees of factories covered under these legislations. In fact, the women employees of factories get maternity benefit from the Employees State Insurance Corporation under the Employees State Insurance Act, 1948. The Rules have been framed under this Act, according to which Inspector of Factories is ex-officio Inspector of this Act in respect of factories registered under the Factories Act, 1948.

Recently on the recommendations of the Administrative Reforms Department, of Government of Delhi, a decision has been taken by the department to transfer the work of enforcement of this non-technical legislation from Factories Inspectorate to the Labour Inspectors and Inspecting Officers of the department, who enforce other labour laws.

5. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936

Application:-The Payment of Wages Act, 1936 is central legislation which applies to the persons employed in the factories and to persons employed in industrial or other establishment specified in sub-clauses (a) to (g) of clause (ii) of Section 2 of this Act. This Act has not apply on workers whose wages payable in respect of a wage period average Rs.1600/- a month or more. Since the minimum wages in Delhi are much higher, this Act has become almost redundant in its present form. The Ministry of labour has already initiated the process for suitable>

Salient Features :-

  • This Act has been enacted with the intention of ensuring timely payment of wages to the workers and for payment of wages without unauthorized deductions.
  • The salary in factories/establishments employing less than 1000 workers is required to be paid by 7th of every month and in other cases by 10th day of every month.
  • A worker, who either has not been paid wages in time or an unauthorized deductions have been made in his/her wages, can file a claim either directly or through a Trade Union or through an Inspector under this Act, before with the Authority appointed under the Payment of Wages Act. The power for hearing and deciding claims under this Act has been vested with the Presiding Officer of a Labour Court.
  • Recently on the recommendations of the Administrative Reforms Department, of Government of Delhi, a decision has been taken by the department to transfer the work of enforcement of this non-technical legislation from Factories Inspectorate to the Labour Inspectors and Inspecting Officers of the department, who enforce other labour laws.

6. The Punjab Industrial Establishment(National Festival Holidays, Casual Sick Leave,) Act,1965 as extended to the NCT of Delhi)

Application:- The Punjab Industrial Establishment (National and Festival Holidays, Casual Sick Leave) Act,1965 and the Rules made thereunder have been enforced in the National Capital Territory of Delhi w.e.f. 1.1.1974.

Applicability:- This Act is applicable on factories covered under provisions of the Factories Act, 1948 .

Salient Provisions:-

  • As per provisions of this Act, every employer is required to allow three National holidays and a minimum of four festival holidays in a year.
  • There is also a provision in this Act for of seven days Casual Leave in and 14 days Sick Leave at half pay in a year. However the workers entitled to sickness benefit under the Employees State Insurance Act, 1948 are not entitled for Sick Leave. Since most of the factories are covered under Employees State Insurance Act, 1948, the Sick Leave provisions are generally no applicable on workers employed in factories. It has also been clarified in Section 14 of this Act, that nothing contained in this Act, shall affect any right or privileges, which any worker is entitled to receive under any other law, contract, custom or usage, if such rights or privileges are more favourable to him than those to which he would be entitled under this Act.
  • This Act requires the maintenance of Register containing details of Casual and Sick leave availed by the workers.
  • There is also provision of mutual consultation between the management and the workers under this Act and Rules made there under for deciding the days to be observed as festival holidays in a factory.

Penal Provisions:- The Rules framed under this Act provide for a punishment with a fine which may extend up to Rs.250/- only.

Recently on the recommendations of the Administrative Reforms Department, of Government of Delhi, a decision has been taken by the department to transfer the work of enforcement of this non-technical legislation from Factories Inspectorate to the Labour Inspectors and Inspecting Officers of the department, who enforce other labour laws.

Functions Of Inspectorate Of Factories

The Inspectorate performs the following functions, under the aforesaid legislations:-

This Inspectorate looks after the enforcement of laws governing occupational health, safety and welfare of workers in factories licenced /covered under the provisions of the Factories Act, 1948. The Chief Inspector of Factories is assisted by Deputy Chief Inspectors of Factories and Inspectors of Factories. The Chief Inspector of Factories, who heads this Inspectorate works under the administrative control of Labour Commissioner cum Secretary (Labour) of Government of NCT of Delhi .

Statutory Approvals required to be obtained:-

  • Approval of Factory building/ plans before construction/extension:-
    The application is required to be made in prescribed Form No.1 accompanied by relevant documents.
  • Grant of Licence:-
    The application is required to be made in prescribed Form No.2 accompanied by fees specified in the schedule appended under Rule 5 of the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950, two copies of Factory Building Plans and other relevant documents. The licence shall be granted by the Chief Inspector of Factories in prescribed Form No.4 which shall be valid upto 31st December of the year in which the licence is granted.
  • Renewal of Licence:-
    The licence under the provisions of the Factories act is required to be renewed by Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories /Chief Inspector of Factories on payment of prescribed fees. The fees payable for renewal of licence per year is same as that for grant of licence. The application is required to be made in prescribed in Form No.2.The application for renewal may be made for one year or five years at the discretion of the management of a factory. In case of renewal for five years, the fees payable would be five times the fees chargeable for grant/annual renewal of licence. The application for renewal is requested to be made at-least 30 days before the due date of expiry of the licence. If the application for renewal duly completed in all respects is not received within the time specified above, the licence shall be renewed only on payment of fees 25% in excess fees ordinarily payable for renewal of licence.
  • Grant of exemption under working hour provisions of the factories Act, 1948.
  • Grant of "Certificate of Competency" of persons/institutions for inspection and certification of equipments, such as, pressure plants, lifting machines, etc. in factories.
  • Medical examination of workers engaged in dangerous/hazardous operations by Certifying Surgeon of the Department.
  • Inspection of factories and Investigation of complaints on aforesaid legislations.
  • Inspection of hazardous factories, and assisting the managements of factories in preparation of On-Site Emergency Plan and assisting the District Administration in preparation of Off-Site Emergency Plan, in accordance with the duties and functions assigned under the Manufacture Storage and import of Hazardous Chemical Rules,1989. and the Chemical Accidents(Emergency Planning Preparedness and Response) Rules, 1996. The Inspector of Factories is 0ex-officio Member-Secretary of the Distinct Crisis Group. This Group is required to hold periodical meetings at least once in 45 days. The District Crisis Group is the Apex body in the District to deal with major chemical accidents and provide expert guidance for handling accidents. The Chief Secretary of the Government of Delhi is the ex-officio Chairperson and the Secretary(Labour) of Delhi is Member-Secretary, with Chief Inspector of Factories as member of the State Crisis Group besides other members. This Group is required to meet periodically at least once in three months. The State Crisis Group is the Apex body in the NCT of Delhi to deal with the major chemical accidents and to provide expert guidance. The functions of these Groups are given in the Chemical Accidents (Emergency Planning, Preparedness Response) Rules 1996.

Besides the aforesaid statutory functions, the Inspectorate also implements Plan Scheme titled "Delhi Safety Awards" and "Delhi Shramik Sujhao Puraskar" Schemes and hold meetings of Awards Committee and Awards Distribution function every year. These schemes aim at arousing Safety consciousness amongst managements and workers of Factories.

The Inspectorate is headed by Chief Inspector of Factories, who works under the administrative control of the Labour Commissioner-cum-Secretary (Labour), Government of N.C.T. of Delhi. At present, he is assisted by following technical officers besides supporting staff:-

  • Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories - 2
  • Certifying Surgeon - 1
  • Inspectors of Factories - 6

Duties, Functions and Work assigned to Technical Officers

Inspectors of Factories:-

  • Investigation of complaints and serious/fatal accidents and reply to complainants.
  • Periodical inspections of factories to check compliances of legislations enforceable by the Inspectorate.
  • Inspection of hazardous and Major Accidents Hazardous Factories for enforcements of duties assigned to this Inspectorate,
  • Issue of Notices after inspection, preparing challans against defaulters, filing and conducting them in the court till disposal,
  • Member-Secretary of the District Crisis Group of the District, for approval of On-Site Emergency Plans and Preparation of Off-Site Emergency Plan and other functions in accordance with the Chemical accidents(Emergency, Planning, preparedness and Responses) Rules,1996.

Duties and functions of Certifying Surgeon:-

  • Medical examination of workers engaged in dangerous/hazardous processes,
  • Certification of age on non-adult workers.

Duties and functions of Deputy Chief Inspector of Factories :

  • To supervise of the work of Inspectors of Factories in respect of districts assigned to them,
  • Renewal of Licences granted under the Factories Act, 1948 ,
  • Scrutiny of factory building plans before approval by Chief Inspector of Factories ,
  • Scrutiny of applications and inspections of factories for grant and amendments on the licence,
  • Scrutiny of applications for grant of certificate of competency by Chief Inspector of Factories ,
  • To act as Member-Secretary of the ' Delhi Safety Award' and 'Delhi Shramik Sujhao Puraskar' Plan Scheme and all related functions,
  • To assist Labour Commissioner/Chief Inspector of Factories, in other functions which may be assigned from time to time.

The details of districts/functions assigned to officers/Inspectors of Factories are as under :-

Designation of the OfficersDistrict allotted
Inspector of FactoriesSouth-West
Inspector of FactoriesSouth
Inspector of FactoriesWest
Inspector of FactoriesNorth-West
Inspector of FactoriesCentral, North,
Inspector of FactoriesNew Delhi, East North-East
Certifying SurgeonWhole of Delhi
Dy. Chief Inspector of FactoriesSouth, Central, North, New Delhi
Dy. Chief Inspector of FactoriesNorth-West, East and North-East.

No. of Inspection and Challans made by the officials

YearNo. of InspectionChallans filedNo. of challans realizedFine Decided
1999248887309Rs.8,62,000/-
20002490234115Rs.8,82,000/-

7. Inspection of hazardous factories, and assisting the managements of factories in preparation of On-Site Emergency Plan and assisting the District Administration in preparation of Off-Site Emergency Plan, in accordance with the duties and functions assigned under the Manufacture Storage and import of Hazardous Chemical Rules, 1989. and the Chemical Accidents (Emergency Planning Preparedness and Response) Rules, 1996. The Inspector of Factories is ex-officio Member-Secretary of the Distinct Crisis Group. This Group is required to hold periodical meetings at least once in 45 days. The District Crisis Group is the Apex body in the District to deal with major chemical accidents and provide expert guidance for handling accidents. The Chief Secretary of the Government of Delhi is the ex-officio Chairperson and the Secretary (Labour) of Delhi is Member-Secretary, with Chief Inspector of Factories as member of the State Crisis Group besides other members. This Group is required to meet periodically at least once in three months. The State Crisis Group is the Apex body in the NCT of Delhi to deal with the major chemical accidents and to provide expert guidance. The functions of these Groups are given in the Chemical Accidents(Emergency Planning, Preparedness Response) Rules 1996.

Besides the aforesaid statutory functions, the Inspectorate also implements Plan Scheme titled "Delhi Safety Awards" and "Delhi Shramik Sujhao Puraskar" Scheme and hold meetings of Awards Committee and Awards Distribution function every year. These schemes aim at arousing Safety consciousness amongst managements and workers of Factories.

DEPARTMENT OF EXPLOSIVES

The Department of Explosives with its headquarter at Nagpur is the nodal agency to look after safety requirements of the Explosives and Petroleum Sectors. Department of Explosives is headed by Chief Controller of Explosives. It has five circle Offices at Kolkata, Agra, Faridabad, Mumbai and Chennai and 18 Sub-circle offices at various places in the country. The Faridabad Circle covers the NCT of Delhi.

With the overall objective of ensuring safety and security of public and property from fire and explosive, the Department as a statutory authority is entrusted with the administration of Explosives Act, 1884, Petroleum Act, 1934, Inflammable substances Act, 1952 and the following rules framed there under:-

Explosives Act, 1884

  • Explosives Rules, 1983
  • Gas Cylinders Rules, 1981
  • Static Mobile Pressure Vessels (Unfired) Rules, 1981.
  • Notification No. GSR 625(E) dated 07.08.1983 regarding Acetylene.

Petroleum Act, 1934

  • Petroleum rules, 2002.
  • Calcium Carbide rules, 1987.
  • Cinematograph Film rules, 1948

Major activities and functions

  • To approve layout and construction plans/licensing for explosives manufacturing units and other installations with-in the purview of rules administered by it.
  • To control and monitor the sale and transaction of explosives through out the country.
  • To advise Port, Airport and Railway authorities in respect of transportation of explosives and other dangerous substances.
  • To impart training to police personnel, security and other officers in detection and safe handling of explosives.

The Department also acts as an advisory body not only to the Industry but also to the government land Government bodies like Ports, Railways,Surface Transport, Environment and Pollution control Board and Defence Establishments. The Chief Controller of Explosives is a Member in various Inter-Departmental Committees and Central Crisis Group constituted by Ministry of Environment and Forest.

CENTRE FOR OCCUPATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

The centeris located at LNJP hospital, New Delhi. The Occupational Environmental Health at Lok Nayak Hospital has been set up by the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi as a lead agency for:

  • Clinical management of occupational and environmental illness
  • Watching over occupational and environmental health concerns
  • Assessment of working conditions and environment to make work safer and for enhancing productivity
  • Training and education
  • Research on occupational and environmental issues impacting health outcomes
  • Informing and advising the government, industry, workers, and the community.

Activities

A. Clinic: Tuesday and Thursday

B. Training :

  • Nodal agency for providing training on Biochemical waste management
  • Training and physicians and nurses
  • Short course on occupational and environmental medicine
  • Short course in occupational medicine and industrial hygiene

C. Research

  • Hazards of Emerging Technologies, Chemicals, metals and solvent related health risks
  • Vehicular pollution
  • Health and safety of health care workers
  • Biomedical waste management and handling
  • Unemployment and health
  • Nutrition in workplace
  • Work related Musculo-skeletal disorder
  • Mental health and stress at work
  • Injury prevention and control

D. Collaboration and Coordination

  • Union and State Ministries of Environment
  • Union state Ministers of Labour
  • Division of occupational and environmental medicine, University of California, San Francisco Center for Occupational Health, Berkeley, USA:
  • National International workers Union
  • NGOs

E. Information Advise

Centre can advise stakeholders, NGOs and individuals both in community and work setting on occupational and environmental health risks

F. International Journal of Work, Environmental Health and Medical Waste (IHWEH MW)

The centre is finalizing modalities for the publication of an International Journal. A dedicated team of experts is directly involved in the launching of inaugural issue.

OIL INDUSTRY SAFETY DIRECTORATE

Oil Industry Safety Directorate is situated at New Delhi, is a technical directorate under the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas that formulates and coordinates the implementation of a series of self regulatory measures aimed at enhancing the safety in the oil gas industry in India.

Safety Council - To ensure proper implementation of various aspects of safety in the oil industry, Government of India decided to set up a “Safety Council” at the apex in January, 1986 under the administrative control of the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas as a special self regulatory industry agency for safety matters and procedures in respect of hydrocarbon sector.

Safety Council headed by the Secretary of the Ministry of Petroleum Natural Gas as Chairman and include the Addl. Secretary, Joint Secretaries, Advisers in the Ministry of Petroleum Natural Gas, the Chief executives of all the Public Sector Undertakings, oil industry, Statutory bodies such as the Chief Controller of Explosives, Director General of Mines safety, and Adviser (Fire) to the Government of India, Secretary, Central Electricity Board and Director General of Factory Advice Service Labour Institutes ad members.

The Safety Council is assisted by Oil Industry Safety Directorate headed by Executive Director who also acts as the Member Secretary of Safety Council. OISD is manned by a group of technical experts in the area of design, operations, maintenance, inspection, safety, environment, etc. drawn from 'oil industry.

Functions / Responsibilities -

The functions and responsibilities of Oil Industry Safety Directorate are as under:

  • To oversee the implementation of all the decisions of the Safety Council.
  • To keep abreast of the latest design and operating practices m the area of safety and fire fighting hydrocarbon processing industry m the developed countries so as to develop standards and codes that would be suitable>
  • To liaise with the statutory organization on current views and developments and help evolve a concerted effort for the industry
  • To carry out periodic safety audits, review, suggest procedures for improvements and report on the implementation of the suggestions to Safety Council
  • To collect the relevant information and exchange it with the members of the Oil industry including information regarding near accidents, accidents and disasters occurring in the oil industry, and shall also organize industry meetings for exchange of experience
  • To carry out enquiries into accidents, whenever required and provide support to Enquiry Committees set up by the Government
  • To ensure implementation of all approved codes of practices for industrial hygiene
  • To review practice in the storage and handling of dangerous chemicals and ensure compliance with latest standards
  • To review disaster control procedures and company preparedness
  • To review inplant training programs with regard to safety
  • To specify critical drawings / layouts that need to be vetted by Safety Specialists at the design stage and carryout spot checks of design standards based on site audit findings to serve as feed back for establishing new standards at the design state.
  • To review zoning regulations around installations and advise industry/State DICs.

Jurisdiction - The activities of hydrocarbon industry covered by Oil Industry Safety Directorate are as under:

  • Operations pertaining to Oil Exploration and Drilling, Crude Stabilisation, Gas Processing Transportation
  • All Refinery operations
  • Pipeline operations in the storage, transportation, distribution and marketing of crude oil and petroleum products
  • Processing of hydrocarbon for the production of bulk petrochemicals in the large scale sector

Major Activities-

i) Standardization: Standardization is one of the major activities of OISD. It is required to keep abreast of the latest design and operating practices in the areas of safety and fire fighting in the hydrocarbon processing industry in the development countries, so as to develop standards and codes that would be suitable> OISD standards are generally reviewed every 4 years or earlier after first publication to incorporate the latest technological changes and experience gained in their implementation so as to update them in line with the current international practices.

ii) External Safety Audits : The External Safety Audits (ESAs) are conducted regularly to check compliance with respect to implementation of safety standards. It also includes critical examination of all the components of the safety management system viz. Management Policy, management attitude towards safety, safety training, review of plant layouts, operating/ inspection/ maintenance procedures, emergency preparedness plans, usage of personal protective equipment, fire/accident records, fire protection systems, etc.

iii) Safety Awards : Safety performance of the organization in the oil industry is being regularly evaluated through a Safety Award Scheme instituted by Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas. Evaluation of performance is done by specially developed system base on total loss concept. The safety awards are given in following categories :

  • Refineries
  • POL Marketing Organisations
  • LPG Marketing Organisations
  • Oil Gas Production Units
  • Cross Country Pipelines
  • Lube Oil Blending Plants
  • Other Processing Organization

iv) Training Programmes /Workshop : Technical workshops covering entire oil industry are organized to discuss latest developments, sharing of experiences, etc. Case studies on major incidents are presented/discussed to prevent recurrence of similar incidents

v) Dissemination of information: The case studies, accident analysis and other information related to safety improvement are published and distributed to industry through OISD’s journals “PETROSAFE” and “Monthly NEWSLETTER”.

vi) Accident Reporting Investigation: OISD maintains a database of accidents taking place in oil industry. The analysis of these incidents is shared with industry to avoid recurrence. OISD also investigates the major incidents.

DELHI FIRE SERVICE

The Delhi Fire Service came into existence in the year 1942' after amalgamation of 2 fire stations which were separately functioning under the control of Delhi Municipal Committee and New Delhi Municipal Committee. After the World War-lI, the establishment of Delhi Fire Service was approved as a provincial force. At that time, Delhi Fire Service had in all 4 fire stations with 14 appliances and total staff numbering to 186 only.

After the partition of the country in August 1947 and subsequent disturbance, the inadequacy of fire service came to light and certain steps were initiated to improve the fire service. The fire station at Connaught Circus was built on modern lines in the year 1952. The radio communication was first time introduced in Delhi Fire Service in 1954.

There was no planned expansion carried out at any stage and some adhoc measures were taken to reinforce the fire service time to time whenever any big fire incidents occurred. In the year 1970, Delhi Fire Service had 14 fire stations including Training Centre and Headquarters. The total number of fire stations as on date has come to 34 with 2001 fire service personnel working round the clock. Three fire stations are in various stages of construction.

The administrative control of Delhi Fire Service, which was previously with Municipal Corporation of Delhi, rests with the Govt. of National Capital Territory of Delhi since 10th Nov. 1994. The fire service continues to make sincere endeavour by responding to 15000 fire/rescue calls per annum on an average to serve the people of the National Capital Territory of Delhi with the sole motto "WE SERVE TO SAVE".

Jurisdiction - The total area of National Capital Territory of Delhi measuring about 1484 sq.km. is given fire safety coverage by the Delhi Fire Service. The fire units are sent to tackle the incidents fact that the area is under the control of any authorities like MCD, DDA, NDMC and Cantonment Board etc..

The Delhi Fire Service is divided into 5 divisions and 9 sub divisions for attaining operational efficiency. Each division is headed by a Dy. Chief Fire Officer assisted by Divisional Officer and Asstt. Divisional Officer. A Fire Station, depending upon the number of units, is headed by a Station Officer or a Sub Officer who is Incharge of the fire station. The details concerning number of officers and telephone numbers are as under:

SOUTH DIVISION - Areas Covered - Okhla, Nehru Place, Mathura Road, Bhikaji Cama Place, Chanakyapuri, Safdarjung.

WEST DIVISION - Areas covered – Janakpuri, Najafgarh, Kirti Nagar, Shankar Road, Prashad Nagar, Naraina.

CENTRAL DIVISION - Areas Covered - Connaught Circus, Head quarters, Rakab Ganj, Rashtrapati Bhavan, S.P.M. Marg, Teliwara, J.R. Road, Roop nagar

EAST DIVISION - Areas Covered - Shahadra, Laxmi Nagar, Geeta Colony, Daryaganj

NORTH WEST DIVISION - Areas Covered - Moti Nagar, Keshavpuram, Training Center, Tikri Kalan, Badli, Rohini, Bawana, Narela, Wazirpur

Receiving of calls- The Delhi Fire Service Works on a Centralised Mobilizing Scheme. All the emergency calls made on telephone no.101 are received by 10 telephones having parallel lines provided in the control room at Head Quarters which is manned round the clock. As soon as the call is received, the same is transmitted to the nearest fire station from the place of incident and pre-determined number of units are dispatched immediately. The wireless communication is available in all the fire stations, as well as on mobile units which helps in quick transmission of messages to the fire stations concerned.

Fire Fighting Services – The Delhi Fire service does not levy any charges for fire fighting and rescue services provided to the community within the National Capital Territory of Delhi. The department, however, recovers service charges if the fire engines are required to be sent outside the limits of NCT of Delhi.

Fire safety during public/private functions– On request the fire safety cover in the public and private functions is provided by the Delhi Fire Service. The fire engines are provided subject to the availability on prescribed charges which at present is Rs.3000/- per day or part thereof.

Issue of fire reports- The public sometimes needs a copy of the fire report from Delhi Fire Service after the incident. The report is issued by the fire report section of the Delhi Fire Service located at headquarters, Connaught Lane, New Delhi 110001.

Issue of fire safety guidelines – fire prevention wing – The Delhi Fire Services issues fire Safety guidelines to the various agencies for which the cases are to be referred to Chief Fire Officer, Delhi Fire Service through the building authorities concerned or licensing authorities in line with the bldg. of laws/relevant code of practices.

In case of highrise buildings i.e. 15 meter or more in height> In order to avoid inconvenience all the information required in the questionnaire should be properly indicated. The fire safety guidelines are generally issued within two weeks from the date of receipt of request if the relevant information is correctly provided. The public is also advised to submit 3 sets of plans alongwith the duly filled in questionnaire and the building model.

The fire prevention wing is headed by the Deputy Chief fire Officer and assisted by a Divisional Officer and Station Officers.

Issue of No Objection Certificate – Once the guidelines have been issued by the fire deptt., the application for obtaining no objection certificate may be submitted to the Chief Fire Officer by the builder/ owner of the premises

The owners/builders are further advised to ensure the compliance of fire safety guidelines before they approach the Chief Fire Officer for No Objection Certificate. No inspection fee is levied by the fire service for such inspections or issue of NOC. In case of difficulty the matter should be reported to the Dy. Chief Fire Officer or the Chief Fire Officer. The Chief Fire Officer or Deputy Fire Officer may also be contacted in case there is any delay in carrying out the inspection or issue of fire issue of NOC after the inspection has been carried out etc.

The deptt. does not levy any charges for this job for the time being.

Training to general public – The fire service provides training facility at the Training centre or at the nearest fire station to the employees of the public sector undertakings. The training fee is levied for long duration courses but the same is free for the short duration courses.

Fire Precautions in Industries - Owing to the rapid growth of industries, complexities of fire risk have increased enormously. Incidents of such fire risk have increased enormously. Incidents of such fires not only result in huge loss of property but also cause dislocation of work, loss of production, unemployment and so many other kinds of suffering. If adequate fire prevention measures are taken the losses can be minimized.

Do’s

  • Store flammable liquids, gases, solvents, chemicals in stable racks, correctly labelled.
  • Keep chemicals in cool and dry place away from heat.
  • Where hazardous chemicals are used/stored, ensure adequate ventilation and prohibit smoking.
  • Maintain good house keeping. Ensure cigarettes are extinguished before disposal.
  • Use fuses and circuit breakers of correct capacity.
  • Before welding operation, all traces of flammable be removed to a safe
    distance.
  • Welding/Hot work should be carried out under proper fire watch
  • Keep all machinery clean and lubricate it to avoid friction and overheating.
  • Regular fire drills should be carried out.

Don’ts

  • Don’t smoke in prohibited areas.
  • Don’t place obstruction in means of escape.
  • Don’t use damaged cords and avoid temporary connections
  • Don’t plug too many electrical appliances in one socket

DELHI PRODUCTIVITY COUNCIL

Delhi Productivity Council is tripartite, autonomous organization registered under the Societies Registration Act (XXI of 1860) set up on March 23, 1959 at the initiative of the National Productivity Council (under the Ministry of Industry and with the active support of Government of Delhi)

Post Diploma course in Industrial Safety (Full time)

Objective – The objective of the one year post diploma course in Industrial Safety is to impart knowledge, skill and orient attitudes of the candidates to be able to shoulder the responsibilities in advising, coordinating, inspecting, investigating, reporting, promoting and training in the field of Industrial Safety and to achieve effective control over work environment, work procedures and safety practices leading to maximum safety in industries. Candidates possessing the one year post diploma course in Industrial Safety shall be eligible to be appointed as Safety Officer. This diploma is approved by All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), Ministry of Human Resource Development. The examinations are being conducted and Diploma awarded by Board of Technical Education, Government of the National Capital Territory of Delhi. The course is recognized under Section 40-B of the Factories Act (for appointment of Safety Officer) by Technical Board/Labour Department of Govt. of Delhi, Haryana, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Goa , Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.

SUSHRUTA TRAUMA CENTRE (GOVT. OF NCT OF DELHI)

Sushruta Trauma Centre is located at Metcalf Road, (near I.P. College) Delhi. The hospital is having ultra modern and technologically advanced equipments and having 64 beds (and 5 private rooms).

The hospital is round the clock open for Emergency cases. The total number of medical personal is 42 and 57 para medical staff personnel.

The hospital equipped with specialists in following areas:

  • Neuro-surgery
  • Orthopedics
  • General surgery
  • Anesthesia
  • Medicine
  • Radiology

All the diagnostic and trauma facilities available at Sushruta Trauma Centre are free of cost.

The trauma centre is designed to provide timely and appropriate care to the injured in road accidents, industrial accidents, falls, train accidents etc. The trauma team consisting of the doctors from all the different specialities are always ready to provide immediate care to the trauma victims. Very often STC has been receiving mass casualties for which it has stand by beds stored in the basement of the building. At the time of need these beds are taken out and put at available stretchable space in the hospital premises and provide care to the needy patients.

Under the plan scheme, "Establishment of Integrated System for Trauma Care and Networking of Trauma Centers in the Capital City of Delhi" approved in 10th five year plan, Sushruta trauma centre is providing training on trauma care to cats ambulance officers, sub officers under fire safety management academy, Rohini. Very soon the "Emergency Management for Trauma Victims" course will be started for doctors working for Delhi government hospitals.

Resources available and needed

RESOURCES AVAILABLE AND NEED FOR MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, HEALTH ENVIRONMENT SYSTEM

The present study is conducted with an aim of assessing the capabilities available with the national capital territory of Delhi and also the emergency preparedness of the State in case of any major industrial accident or disaster.

For the study different Central State Government institutions, NGOs were surveyed. However, the institutions not working in the area of occupational safety, health management are not covered. As the study is conducted in the National capital territory of Delhi only, no institutions /organizations working for the /in the other neighbouring areas such as Noida, Faridabad, Gurgaon etc., were covered.

MAJOR FINDINGS

The data collected by the study team members were analysied. The major findings are as under :

  • The State of Delhi has witnessed a major shift in the industrial policies due to the directives received from Delhi High Court and Supreme Court. Most of the large, hazardous industries have been shifted to the neighbouring States such as Haryana, Punjab and U.P.
  • The industries employing less than 20 workers with the use of power are growing in number and the larger industries employing more than 100 workers are reducing.
  • Presently only one industry employing more than 1000 workers is working in the NCT of Delhi and no industry is left in the State of Delhi employing more than 5000 workers.
  • Delhi being the capital State of the country has got number of organizations working in the field of occupational safety, health and environment under different ministries, departments of the State and Central Government.
  • Off-site emergency plan for chemical disaster in the NCT of Delhi is developed by the Central Crisis Group under the chairmanship of Chief Secretary of the Govt. of NCT of Delhi.

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • The State of Delhi is having a very large number of small scale industries in the densely populated localities. Most of these industries fall under the category 2m(i) which denotes the factories employing 10 or more workers and working with the aid of power. In order to lower the cost of these machines the owners of these units may intend to ignore the safety and health aspects which may result into an occurrence of the accident. Therefore, it is suggested that the organizations specially working in the area of small scale sector should take up the issue of developing and suggesting basic minimum guarding in the existing and new machineries.
  • Organisations like National Small Industries Corporation Limited who are running hire purchase scheme for a specific group of owner/managers should ensure about the occupational safety aspect of machines and tools hired and purchased by them.
  • NCT of Delhi being the capital of the country is having very important organizations such as Office of the Chief Inspector of Factories, Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Explosives, Pollution Control Board, National Small Industries Corporation Ltd., Delhi Productivity Council, Delhi Fire Service etc. These organizations can develop a common platform where matter of occupational safety and health can be discussed and policies at the State level may be formulated which may be followed as a model by the other States.
  • In order to achieve this objective a 1-2 day Seminar may be organized by Regional Labour Institute, Faridabad. During the seminar /workshop specialist and experts working for the organizations involved for improving the safety and health of the people at work.

References

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES

  • Delhi Statistical Handbook (2000), Directorate of Economic Statistics Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi
  • Bulletin of Occupational and Environmental Health (2002), Vol. 1, Indraprastha Vyavasayik Evam Paryavaran Swasthya Samiti (IVPSS), COEH, Government of Delhi, LNJP Hospital, New Delhi
  • Report on Classification of Employees in Delhi Govt. and Autonomous/Local Bodies (2000), Directorate of Economic Statistics and Office of the Chief Registrar Birth Deaths, Govt. of N.C.T. of Delhi
  • Off-site Emergency Plan for chemical disaster in Delhi (2002) State Crisis Group, Labour Department, govt. of NCT, New Delhi
  • Report on Employment and Unemployment Situation in Delhi (2002), NSS 55th Round, July 1999-June 2000 State Sample, Directorate of Economic Statistics, Old Secretariat, Delhi
  • Labour Statistics (2000), Office of the Labour Commissioner, Planning Statistical Cell, Govt. of National Capital Territory of Delhi
  • Index of Industrial Production (2000-01), Govt. of N.C.T. of Delhi, Directorate of Economic Statistics, Delhi
  • Citizen’s Charter and Information (1998), Delhi Fire Service, New Delhi
  • Information booklet (2002), Oil Industry Safety Directorate, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Govt. of India, New Delhi
  • Factories Act 1948

Annexure

APPENDIX-I

Occupations Declared Dangerous under Section 87 of the Factories Act, 1948

  • Manufacture of aerated water and processes incidental thereto
  • Electrolytic plating or Oxidation of metal by use of an Electrolytic containing chromic acid or other chromium compounds
  • Manufacture and repair of electric accumulators
  • Glass manufacture
  • Grinding and treatment of lead grinding and glazing of metal
  • Manufacture and treatment of lead and certain compounds of lead
  • Generating gas from dangerous petroleum
  • Cleaning or smoothing of articles by a jet of sand, metal shot or grid or other abressive propelled by a blast of compressed or a steam
  • Liming and tanning of raw hides and skins and process incidental thereto
  • Manufacture of Pottery and ceramics
  • Carrying on a certain processes of lead and lead material in printing presses and type foundries
  • Chemical works
  • Manufacture of articles from refractory materials
  • Handling and processing of asbestos from manufacture of any article of asbestos and process of manufacture or otherwise in which asbestos is used in any form
  • Handling and manipulation of corrosive substances
  • Compression of oxygen and hydrogen produced by the Electrolysis of water
  • Process of extracting of oil and facts from extracting plants
  • Manufacture of manipulation of manganese and its compounds
  • Manufacture of manipulation of dangerous pesticides
  • Manufacture, handling and use of benzene and substances containing benzene
  • Manufacturing process or operation in carbon-disulphide plants
  • Manufacture and manipulation of carcenogenic dye intermediates
  • Operation involving compressed gases
  • Highly flammable compressed gases
  • Operations in foundries
  • Manipulation of stone or any other material containing free silica

APPENDIX-II

Prohibition of Employment of the Child Labour under Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986

Employment of children below the age of 14 years is prohibited in the following processes carried out in a workshop where section 67 of the Factories Act, 1948 is not applicable

  • Bidi making
  • Carpet weaving
  • Cement-manufacture, including bagging of cement
  • Cloth printing, dyeing and weaving
  • Manufacturing of matches, explosives and fire works
  • Mica cutting and splitting
  • Shellac manufacture
  • Soap manufacture
  • Tanning
  • Wool cleaning
  • Building and construction industry

APPENDIX-III

STATE CRISIS GROUP FOR NATIONAL CAPITAL TERRITORY OF DELHI
DUTIES OF VARIOUS AUTHORITIES DURING OPERATION OF AN OFF-SITE EMERGENCY PLAN FOR CHEMICAL DISASTER IN DELHI.

General

Chemicals are a vital component of every day life and occupy an important position in our economy. There has been a rapid increase in recent times in their use in industry and house-hold. Many of these chemicals are toxic, highly reactive, explosive or flammable, or have combination of these characteristics. Due to these properties, they have potential to cause damage to human beings, other living creatures, plant, property and the general environment. It is therefore, necessary to take utmost care, while handling such chemicals at all stages of manufacture, processing , treatment, storage, transportation, use, or sale.

The potential for major accidents caused by the increasing production, storage and use of hazardous substances implies that a well defined systematic approach is required if major disasters are to be avoided. Although such an emergency may be caused by a number of factors e.g., plant failure, human error, earth quake, vehicle crash or sabotage, it will normally manifest itself in any of three basic forms viz. fire, explosion or toxic release.

Unlike natural disasters which can not be prevented the occurance of emergencies caused through chemical accidents can be minimized by proper planning and preparedness. Such a planning can be successful, only if those responsible for handling hazardous substances are aware about hazards and have a concern about it. This has to be supported by the local authorities, State Government and the Central Government.

Statutory Provisions

The Government of India has enacted legislations for safe handling, storage, use and transportation of hazardous and toxic chemicals. These rules are enforced by various agencies at Central and State Government levels. These agencies include, Controller of Explosives(Government of India), Central Pollution Control Board(Government of India), Delhi Pollution Control Committee, Factories Inspectorate, transport authorities and local health authorities.

Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 has been supplemented by the "Manufacture Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules,1989." These Rules, which have been enacted by the Central Government for managing chemical accidents, the "Chemical Accidents (Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Response) Rules, 1996 “compliment the Manufacture Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules, 1989. It provides for a four tier crisis management system to be setup at Local, District, State and Central level. The rules were notified on 2nd August, 1996 by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, under the Environment Protection Act, 1986.

These Rules provide for a statutory back-up for setting up of Crisis Groups at Local, District, State and Central Level which have Major Accident Hazard (MAH) installations. As per provisions of these Rules, the Government of India has constituted a Central Crisis Group, to deal with major chemical accidents and provide expert guidance for handling major chemical accidents in the country besides other functions mentioned in Office Order No. 3-15/91-HSMD dated 27.09.1996.

The Rules provide for keeping public informed on chemical accidents, prevention, preparedness and mitigation. These Rules will enable preparation of Off-site Emergency Plan, updation, and conduct of mock-drill. It will further enhance the implementation of Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991, for providing relief to the victims

Institutional Framework

State Governments are required to constitute (i) State Crisis Group (SCG) (ii) District Crisis Groups (DCGs) and (iii) Local Crisis Groups (LCGs) to plan and respond to chemical accidents in the state. The Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi vide Order dated 12.10.1998 of the Secretary(Revenue), Government of Delhi has constituted the State Crisis Group, nine District Crisis Groups and District Emergency Authorities.

"Central Crisis Group" is the apex body in the country to deal with and provide expert guidance for planning and handling of chemical accidents in the country. The Central Crisis Group shall continuously monitor the post -accident situation and suggest measures for prevention of reoccurrence of such accidents. It is required to meet once in six months and respond to queries from State Crisis Groups and District Crisis Groups .

The Chief Secretary of the Government of NCT of Delhi is the ex-officio chairperson of the " State Crisis Group", which is the apex body of the Government of Delhi, consisting of government officials, technical experts and industry representatives. This group is required to deliberate on planning, preparedness and to provide guidance for handling of chemical accidents, with a view to reducing the extent of loss of life, property and ill- health. The State Crisis Group will review all the Off-site

Emergency Plans for chemical disaster for its adequacy. This group is required to meet one in three months.

The Dy. Commissioner is ex-officio chair-person of the "District Crisis Group" and this Group is the apex body at the district level and is required to review all On-site emergency plans prepared by the occupiers of the Major Accident Hazards(MAH) installations for preparation of the District offsite Emergency plan which shall also include hazards due to transportation of hazardous chemicals by road and by pipelines. The District Crisis Group is required to meet once in a 45 days and conduct one full scale mock-drill of the District Offsite Emergency Plan, on a site every year.

Management of Emergencies due to hazardous chemicals

Fighting emergency arising out of a Chemical Accident calls for a concerted effort at Local, District, State and Central Level and utilisation of the available resources within shortest possible time. That is the key to success in overcoming the crisis.

Central Crisis Group - Constitution and functions

By an order number 3-15/91-HSMD dated 27th September, 1996, the Central Crisis Group (CCG) has been set up by Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. This is an apex body comprising senior officials of the Government and technical experts.

The functions of the Group shall be as follows:-

  • To deal with major chemical accidents and provide expert guidance for handling major chemical accidents in the country.
  • Continuously monitor the post-accident situation arising out of a major chemical accident and suggest measures for prevention and to check recurrence of such accidents.
  • Conduct post-accident analysis of such major chemical accidents and evaluate responses.
  • Review District Off-site Emergency Plans with a view to examining its adequacy in accordance with, the Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemicals Rules, 1989 and suggest measures to reduce risks in the industrial pockets.
  • Review the progress reports submitted by the State Crisis Group.
  • Respond to queries addressed to it by the State Crisis Group and District Crisis Group .
  • Publish a State-wise list of experts and officials who are concerned with the handling of chemical accidents.
  • Render in the event of a chemical accident in a State, all financial and infrastructural help as may be necessary.

The CCG shall meet once in every six months in the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Paryavaran Bhawan, New Delhi. The Group may co-opt any person whose assistance or advice is considered useful in performing any of its functions.

The CCG deals only with major chemical accidents in the country where State Governments require marshalling of resources from other States as well as from the Central Government. The Chief Secretary, the District Magistrates of the concerned State/Districts should immediately inform the CCG about the accidents. It will meet as soon as possible after the accidents. It will meet as soon as possible after the receipt of information about the accident in carrying out its task, it shall consult experts, coordinate activities of the State Governments and the Central Ministries Departments/Agencies and keep the Cabinet Secretariat and appropriate authorities in the Government of India constantly informed about development.

State Crisis Group - constitution and functions

By an order No. F-36(401)/98/CA/Estt./2682-2704 dated 12.10.98 the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi has constituted State Crisis Group (SCG) which shall be the apex body to deal with the Major Chemical Accidents and provide guidance for handling such accidents in the National Capital Territory of Delhi.

The functions of the State Crisis Group shall be as follows :-

  • To review all district off-site emergency plans in the National Capital Territory of Delhi with a view to examine their adequacy in accordance with the Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules,1989 and forwards a report to the CCG once in three months;
  • To assist the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi in the planning, preparedness and mitigation of major chemical accidents at a site in the National Capital Territory of Delhi.
  • To assist the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi in managing chemical accidents at a site;
  • To continuously monitor the post accident situation arising out of a major chemical accident in the National Capital Territory of Delhi and forward a report to the Central Crisis Group.
  • To review the progress reports submitted by District Crisis Groups.
  • To respond to queries addressed to it by District Crisis Groups.
  • To publish a list of experts and officials in the National Capital Territory of Delhi who are concerned with the management of chemical accidents.

Composition of State Crisis Group

The composition of State Crisis Group is as follows:

1Chief Secretary, Govt. of NCT of DelhiChairperson
2Secretary (Labour), Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember Secretary
3Secretary (Environment), Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
4Secretary (Home), Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
5Secretary (Industries), Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
6Secretary (Health), Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
7Chairperson, Delhi Pollution Control Committee,Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
8Commissioner (Transport) Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
9Chief Inspector of Factories Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
10Chief Fire Officer, Govt. of NCT of DelhiMember
11Commissioner of Police,DelhiMember
12One Representative of Oil Companies(to be appointed later on)Member
13Shri. D. AdhikariMember
14Smt. Indrani Chander ShekharanMember
15Dean (MAMC)Member
16Medical Superintedent (LNJP) DelhiMember

7. Duties of Various authorities during operation of an off-site emergency plan.

1.1 Deputy Commissioner of the District:-

The Deputy Commissioner of the district is the District Emergency Authority and is the nodal person for directing/co-ordinating management of an off-site emergency. He is also the Chair-person of the District Crisis Group, constituted under the Chemical Accidents(Emergency Planning, Preparedness & Response) Rules,1996. His/her functions are:-

  • To declare an emergency, through PCR
  • To withdraw an emergency and to declare the affected areas normal for any entry after evacuation.
  • To assume over all control and to provide directions and co-ordination of all resources in tackling emergency with minimum damage to life, environment & property.
  • To organise relief to the affected persons through PCRs, CATS Vans, NGOs using the available resources in consultation with Delhi Government.
  • To mobilise resources.
  • To organise medical assistance and relief through medical services, voluntary organisation and NGOs.
  • To clean up the affected area and rehabilitation of affected population, including evacuation.
  • To inform media for publication/dissemination of necessary information.
  • To inform the Chief Secretary being the Chair-person of the State Crisis Group about the decisions taken and progress in tackling emergency.

7.2 Action by Police Control Room:-

  • To inform about the disaster to:- Delhi Fire Service (ii)Dy. Commissioner cum District Emergency AuthorityDisaster Management Centre of Delhi Police Local Police and other civic bodies i.e. MCD, NDMC Delhi Jal Board Delhi Vidyut Board CATS Home Guards and Civil Defence through Police Wireless or any other mode of quick communication.
  • To direct PCR Vans of nearby areas to rush to spot without loss of time.
  • To inform all major hospitals promptly to keep ready and make
    preparation to receive and treat the injured persons.
  • Central Accident Trauma Services(CATS) to be directed to the spot for the removal of injured
    persons to the hospitals.
  • To inform the concerned Dy. Commissioner of Police or his representative to take charge of the situation and send the Situation Report to all concerned.
  • The district DCP to alert all hospitals in his jurisdiction. The Assistant Commissioner of Police /SHO to depute one nodal officer to go to the hospitals of the area and to get the Medico Legal Cases(MLCs) prepared and other related information that may be helpful to identify victims.
  • To mobilise experts in consultation with District Emergency Authority, if required to assist for managing emergency and to position them at such a point so that they are easily accessible and their advice put into effective use.
  • To obtain necessary information on meteorology from the Fire Control Room to support the efforts of fire and other responders in the field for defining vulnerable areas.
  • Arrange for information to general public for self protection and emergency actions.
  • To provide information to near relatives of the affected persons of their whereabouts and condition of the victims.

7.3 Fire Services:-

  • To act as a primary Emergency Responder.
  • To take action, such as to provide Water-Curtain etc., to manage
    chemical accidents based on technical information and advice of
    Experts.
  • To provide and co-ordinate the personal protection of Respondents
    on or near the accident site.
  • To provide an on scene assessment of emergency status to Fire Control Room/ Police Control Room/District Emergency Authority.
  • To provide support and protection for technical experts, who may be required to carry out special operations to contain a chemical accident such as sealing a chemical leak, repairing a damaged pipeline.
  • To provide normal fire fighting/control and rescue action in line with the normal role.
  • To provide normal fire fighting/control and rescue action in line with the normal role.
  • Fire Control Room(FCR) to coordinate and communicate with concerned authorities.
  • Central Fire Officer to act as a Response Coordinator and give on-scene assessment to District Emergency Authority.
  • Local Fire Station to give on scene assessment to Central Fire Officer and District Emergency Authority.
  • To provide Emergency Response Action.

7.4 Local Police:-

  • To rush to the spot with ropes, search lights and other items for maintaining law and order.
  • To cordon off the area and dispersal of crowd.
  • To give near scene Assessment to Distt. Dy. Commissioner of Police and District Emergency Authority.
  • To provide support functions.
  • To control traffic and diversions
  • To ensure clear passage to Emergency Vehicles. Only the Emergency Vehicles and authorised responders are allowed to go right to the place of accident.
  • To help rescue services and volunteers in all possible manners.
  • To contact nearby hospitals for making emergency arrangements for receiving injured persons.
  • To provide adequate force, depending upon the seriousness of a situation which may be kept at the scene of occurrence for safe guarding property/belongings of the disaster victims, and also ensure security of affected and evacuated area.
  • To preserve the scene of occurrence and debris till examination by
    Experts
  • To advice Home-Guards and Civil Defence to remain alert for responding to call from Police.

7.5 Traffic Police:-

  • To coordinate and communicate with concerned functionaries.
  • To detail the traffic staff to reach the place of occurrence.
  • To give directions wherever necessary, to ensure free passage for Fire Brigade Ambulances, Police Vehicles and Vehicles of other responsders.
  • DCP (Traffic) to coordinate with the DTC and other private transporters for additional vehicles.
  • To mobilize cranes at strategic points for towing away unwanted standing vehicles.
  • To give near Scene Assessment to DCP(Traffic) & District Emergency Authority.
  • To provide support function.

7.6 CATS.

  • To alert CATS Vans in the vicinity.
  • To direct CATS Vans to the points where evacuation is required.
  • To alert hospitals about arriving of casualties through CATS Control
    Room.
  • To give feed back to District Emergency Authority of medical status and advice further.
  • CATS Control Room to coordinate and communicate with concerned functionaries.
  • To give near Scene Assessment to its Control Room and District Emergency Authority.

7.7 Health services:-

  • To coordinate Ambulances and Response Units.
  • To inform and alert the hospitals, on arrival of casualties and
    provide support functions.
  • To carry/seek accommodation of medical resources.
  • To provide necessary advice and medical information to medical practitioners/professionals in the affected areas regarding First-aid and other medical action, if required .
  • To organize relief and to provide additional medical supplies and facilities through hospitals for augmenting resources available in area of medical treatment.
  • To liaison with Technical Experts of hospitals, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Poison Control Centre, etc. and to provide medical advice to all primary and secondary medical Responders, as required.
  • To evaluate medical status based on feed back from the field units .
  • To advice the District Emergency Authority on medical status and seek additional assistance, if required.

7.8. Civil Defence and Home Guards:-

  • Civil Defence personnel would assist the first line responder i.e. Delhi Fire Services to provide vital support, to bring the situation unhindered under Control.
  • During post emergency, Civil Defence personnel, may assist people in evacuation from affected areas to relief Camps . It would assist the concerned agencies for evacuation and de-contamination work.
  • The Civil-Defence and Home-guards would provide support role to various respond agencies and to remain alert/stand by for responding to any demand from District Emergency Authority.

7.9. Chief Secretary and divisional commissioner :-

TheChief Secretary, Government of Delhi being the Chair person of the State Crisis Group, based on the advice of the District Emergency Authority, would advise the Divisional Commissioner to direct the Dy. Commissioners cum District Emergency Authorities of the neighbouring districts of an impending emergency situation and direct them to declare emergency as it may deem fit in a given situation.

7.10. DTC:-

  • To provide support functions
  • To remain alert and to provide stand by reserve on demand from District Emergency Authority.

7.11 .MCD/NDMC:-

  • To provide support functions such as Schools, Community Centres, which have already been identified and can be used for Night Shelter for affected persons.
  • To identify tent house(s) so as to provide tents, beddings for the affected persons in the hour of crisis.
  • To remain alert/standby for any other assistance, which may be required by the District Emergency Authority.
  • To investigate accident in godowns, isolated storages, industries under the provisions of the MCD Act.

7.12. Railways:-

  • To provide support functions.
  • To Control Rail Traffic near the accident site.

7.13. NGOs.:-

  • To assist the District Emergency Authority in organizing relief and rehabilitation.

7.14 .Transport Department:-

  • To investigate chemical accident in a Truck/Lorry tanker covered under the provisions of the Motor Vehicle Act, in association with Delhi Traffic Police.

7.15 Experts:-

  • To provide technical advice and guidance to District Emergency Authority and State Government.
  • To render necessary assistance in investigation of cause of
    accident.

7.16. Delhi Pollution Control Committee :-

To investigate accidents in isolated storages, industries not covered under the Factories Act, 1948 , pipelines and hazardous substances under transportation by Road/Railway and suggest remedial measures.

7.17 .Chief Inspector of Factories, Labour Department:-

To investigate cause of accident in a factory licensed/coverable under the provisions of the Factories Act, 1948, and suggest remedial measures.